Journal of Datta Meghe Institute of Medical Sciences University

ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year
: 2021  |  Volume : 16  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 15--19

Study of knowledge and attitude about breastfeeding practices and newborn care in rural areas


Madhvi Dhamania, Asmeet Chawla, Pranjali Bhagwat, Priyanka Bhalgat, Shivani Sharma, Sheetal Pawar 
 Department of Community Medicine, Jawaharlal Nehru Medical College, Datta Meghe Institute of Medical Sciences (Deemed to be University), Wardha, Maharashtra, India

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Asmeet Chawla
Indira Hostel, Sawangi Meghe, Wardha, Maharashtra
India

Abstract

Objectives: The objective is to study knowledge and attitude about breastfeeding and newborn care practices and factors affecting initiation and duration of breastfeeding in rural areas. Materials and Methods: Mothers with their babies who came for Oral Polio Vaccine (OPV1) and Diphtheria, Pertussis, and Tetanus Immunization (DPT1) in Acharya Vinoba Bhave Rural Hospital were included in the cross-sectional study after verbal consent. Pretested questionnaire on breastfeeding practices was done. Results: 95% of new-borns cried immediately after birth, meconium passed in 98%,urine passed in 93%, 100% new-borns were immunized. 82% of mothers knew about colostrum. 96 % of mothers knew about immunization, 60% mothers know for which disease immunization is given and all 100% mothers immunized their babies Conclusion: The study emphasizes the need for breastfeeding intervention program in antenatal and postnatal mothers during their checkups. Mothers in rural areas should be encouraged to avail the hospital facilities during their deliveries and postdeliveries.



How to cite this article:
Dhamania M, Chawla A, Bhagwat P, Bhalgat P, Sharma S, Pawar S. Study of knowledge and attitude about breastfeeding practices and newborn care in rural areas.J Datta Meghe Inst Med Sci Univ 2021;16:15-19


How to cite this URL:
Dhamania M, Chawla A, Bhagwat P, Bhalgat P, Sharma S, Pawar S. Study of knowledge and attitude about breastfeeding practices and newborn care in rural areas. J Datta Meghe Inst Med Sci Univ [serial online] 2021 [cited 2021 Oct 21 ];16:15-19
Available from: http://www.journaldmims.com/text.asp?2021/16/1/15/322589


Full Text



 Introduction



Breastfeeding is an important determinant of child survival, prevention of childhood infections, and birth spacing. The beneficial effects depend on breastfeeding initiation, duration, and age at which breastfed child is weaned, which is influenced by social, cultural, and economic factors. Hence, the study with these relationships helps in orienting the breastfeeding promotional activities.[1],[2]

 Materials and Methods



This cross-sectional hospital-based study was conducted in Acharya Vinoba Bhave Rural Hospital (AVBRH), Sawangi (M), Wardha.

A total of 100 mothers having children <2 years who visited for vaccination and postnatal mothers in obstetrics outpatient department (OPD) were included in the study. Data were collected using a pretested structured questionnaire on breastfeeding practices. We have selected and interviewed every alternate mother visiting the OPD of AVBRH after verbal consent.

Statistical analysis

Statistical analysis was done using bar diagram, pie chart, and Chi-square test.

Ethical clearance

The Institutional Ethics Committee of DMIMSDU has approved the Research work proposed to be carried out at Jawaharlal Nehru Medical College, Sawangi(M), Wardha. Date: 27th March 2017 with Reference no DMIMS(DU)/IEC/2017-18/340.

 Results



Majority (72%) women married at the age of 18–25 years, 18% had >25 years, and 10% of women were <18 years. Majority (55%) women educated up to primary, 35% were illiterates, and only 10% of women educated up to secondary. Majority of women (45%) having socioeconomic status grade III.

Sixty-one percent were primigravida, 25% had birth order 2nd, 10% had 3rd, 3% had 4th, and remaining had >4. AVBRH used by 45% mothers, 25% approached Anganwadi, 20% approached government hospitals, 5% approached private hospitals, and 5% approached other health facilities. Of total hospital deliveries, 90% were normal and 10% were cesarean, and out of total home deliveries, 90% were attended by trained dais.

Surgical blade was used to cut the umbilical cord in 91% deliveries, knife in 6%, and scissor in 2% deliveries.

Ninety-five percent of newborns cried immediately after birth, meconium passed in 98%, urine passed in 93%, and 100% newborns were immunized. 82% of mothers knew about colostrums. 96% of mothers knew about immunization, 60% mothers know for which disease immunization is given, and all 100% mothers immunized their babies.

 Discussion



Women in rural areas have positive attitude toward breastfeeding. In this study, almost all the women had continued to breastfeed beyond 9 months. Other studies conducted in rural areas show that almost all mothers initiate breastfeeding within 8th h after birth. The earlier and more effective discarding the colostrum is still practiced. Discarding the colostrum and feeding with sugar water, honey, or ghee make the child vulnerable to infections. Madhu et al., 2009 revealed that majority (97%) mothers initiated breastfeeding and 3% were not able to initiate.[3]

With home delivery, 44% of mothers initiated breastfeeding within 30 min, and there was a delay of 2–3 h in feeding with cesarean section, while 19% of the mothers in our study did not breastfeed even after 24 h postdelivery. They were given prelacteal feeds and colostrums discarded [Figure 1] and [Figure 8].{Figure 1}{Figure 2}{Figure 3}{Figure 4}{Figure 5}{Figure 6}{Figure 7}{Figure 8}

In our study, 50% of the mothers initiated breastfeeding within 30 min. All of the mothers breastfeed after the delivery within 24 h. They were given colostrums (82%) and 22% of them given prelacteal feeds. Our findings are correlating with the above study [Figure 2],[Figure 3],[Figure 4],[Figure 5],[Figure 6],[Figure 7].[4],[5]

 Conclusion



The study emphasizes the need for breastfeeding intervention program in antenatal and postnatal mothers during their checkups. People (mothers) in rural areas should be encouraged to avail the hospital facilities during their deliveries, which will surely help maintain the aseptic conditions and proper hygiene during delivery and postnatal periods [Table 1],[Table 2],[Table 3],[Table 4],[Table 5],[Table 6],[Table 7],[Table 8].[6],[7],[8],[9],[10],[11],[12],[13],[14],[15],[16],[17]{Table 1}{Table 2}{Table 3}{Table 4}{Table 5}{Table 6}{Table 7}{Table 8}

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.

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