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 Table of Contents  
LETTER TO EDITOR
Year : 2022  |  Volume : 17  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 811-812

Multifocal transitional carcinoma of urinary bladder: Ultrasonography and doppler imaging


Department of Radiodiagnosis, Jawaharlal Nehru Medical College, Sawangi (Meghe), Wardha, Maharashtra, India

Date of Submission22-Dec-2020
Date of Decision04-Aug-2021
Date of Acceptance27-Dec-2021
Date of Web Publication2-Nov-2022

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Suresh V Phatak
Department of Radiodiagnosis, Jawaharlal Nehru Medical College, Sawangi (Meghe), Wardha - 442 001, Maharashtra
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/jdmimsu.jdmimsu_459_20

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How to cite this article:
Pandey S, Phatak SV, Nidhi Reddy GS, Varma AD. Multifocal transitional carcinoma of urinary bladder: Ultrasonography and doppler imaging. J Datta Meghe Inst Med Sci Univ 2022;17:811-2

How to cite this URL:
Pandey S, Phatak SV, Nidhi Reddy GS, Varma AD. Multifocal transitional carcinoma of urinary bladder: Ultrasonography and doppler imaging. J Datta Meghe Inst Med Sci Univ [serial online] 2022 [cited 2023 Feb 4];17:811-2. Available from: http://www.journaldmims.com/text.asp?2022/17/3/811/360225



One of the most common urinary tract malignancies is bladder cancer. It is the fourth most prevalent cancer in men and the tenth most frequent cancer in women. Urinary bladder cancer occurs in men three to four times more often than in women and has a high rate of recurrence.[1] Synchronous multifocal tumors are usually found in bladder urothelial carcinomas. The growth of multifocal tumors in either a synchronous or metachronous method in the same patient is a common feature of this form of malignancy.[2] The multiple coexisting tumors have often arisen before clinical symptoms become apparent and the separate tumors may or may not share a similar histology.[3] The majority of urothelial cell cancers are found at the base of the bladder along the posterior wall.[4] Most often, sonographically evident bladder cancer presents as a polypoidal mass emanating from the bladder wall. Bladder masses are usually immobile on sonographic examination with shifts in patient location and frequently heterogeneous in echotexture. The presence of flow observed on Doppler color helps to differentiate between a tumor's solid tissue and blood clot or debris.[5]

An 81-year-old male presented with a 15-day history of dysuria and pain during micturition referred to radiology for sonography. Abdominal ultrasound revealed three polypoidal hypoechoic masses of size 4.2 cm × 3.6 cm with peripheral egg shell type of calcification and 9.8 mm × 6.1 mm and 14 mm × 10 mm originating from the posterior wall of the bladder on left side [Figure 1] and [Figure 2]. On color Doppler, there is vascularity seen in the mass [Figure 3]. Computerized tomography confirmed finding of ultrasonography. Biopsy revealed transitional cell carcinoma.
Figure 1: Polypoidal hypoechoic mass of size 4.2 cm × 3.6 cm with peripheral egg shell type of calcification

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Figure 2: Two small polypoidal masses of size 9.8 mm × 6.1 mm and 14 mm × 10 mm

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Figure 3: On color Doppler, there is vascularity in the mass

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Declaration of patient consent

The authors certify that they have obtained all appropriate patient consent forms. In the form the patient(s) has/have given his/her/their consent for his/her/their images and other clinical information to be reported in the journal. The patients understand that their names and initials will not be published and due efforts will be made to conceal their identity, but anonymity cannot be guaranteed.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.



 
  References Top

1.
Jemal A, Siegel R, Xu J, Ward E. Cancer statistics, 2010. CA Cancer J Clin 2010;60:277-300.  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.
Koss LG, Tiamson EM, Robbins MA. Mapping cancerous and precancerous bladder changes. A study of the urothelium in ten surgically removed bladders. JAMA 1974;227:281-6.  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.
Weinstein RS. Origin and dissemination of human urinary bladder carcinoma. Semin Oncol 1979;6:149-56.  Back to cited text no. 3
    
4.
Wong-You-Cheong JJ, Woodward PJ, Manning MA, Sesterhenn IA. From the archives of the AFIP: Neoplasms of the urinarybladder: Radiologic-pathologic correlation. Radiographics 2006;26:553-80.  Back to cited text no. 4
    
5.
Patel U. Imaging and Urodynamics of the Lower Urinary Tract. 2nd ed. London: Springer; 2010.  Back to cited text no. 5
    


    Figures

  [Figure 1], [Figure 2], [Figure 3]



 

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