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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2022  |  Volume : 17  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 657-661

Age assessment by dental and skeletal maturity pattern: A cross-sectional study


1 Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Diagnostic Sciences, Majmaah University, Al Majma'ah, Saudi Arabia
2 Department of Oral Medicine and Radiology, Kamineni Institute of Dental Sciences, Nalgonda, Telangana, India
3 Department of Oral Medicine and Radiology, Yenepoya Dental College, Mangalore, Karnataka, India
4 Department of Prosthodontics, Kamineni Institute of Dental Sciences, Nalgonda, Telangana, India

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Avinash Tejasvi
Department of Oral Medicine and Radiology, Kamineni Institute of Dental Sciences, Narketpally, Nalgonda - 508 254, Telangana
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/jdmimsu.jdmimsu_229_19

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Aim: An attempt was made to estimate the chronologic age of an individual using the dental and skeletal maturity in the Mangalore population. Sample: This study sample comprised 150 individuals (75 males and 75 females) ranging from 10 to 20 years of age. We have divided our sample as ≤16 years and individuals >16 years from 1 month to 20 years for better accuracy. Methodology: Dental age was assessed using the Demirjian method based on seven mandibular teeth. The skeletal age was assessed using a hand-wrist radiograph by applying the method of Bjork, Grave, and Brown. Results: We have found a positive correlation between the chronologic age, estimated dental and skeletal age in individuals ≤16 years. There was a negative correlation seen in the individuals who are >16 years. We propose a linear regression equation obtained using the dental and skeletal method separately for males and females; this can be used to decrease the difference between the estimated age and chronologic age. Conclusion: Both the dental and skeletal methods can be used for age estimation, with the dental method being more accurate than the skeletal method in our population.


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