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CASE REPORT
Year : 2021  |  Volume : 16  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 376-378

Landau kleffner syndrome – Revisited


1 Sri Sathya Sai Sanjeevani Centre for Child Heart Care and Training in Pediatric Cardiac Skills; Department of Pediatrics, Jawaharlal Nehru Medical College, Datta Meghe Institute of Medical Science (Deemed to be University), Wardha, Maharashtra, India
2 Department of Pediatrics, Jawaharlal Nehru Medical College, Datta Meghe Institute of Medical Science (Deemed to be University), Wardha, Maharashtra, India

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Chitturi Sai Sujana
Shalinata PG Girls Hostel, Room G3, Sawangi, Wardha, Maharashtra
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/jdmimsu.jdmimsu_75_18

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Landau Kleffner syndrome (LKS)/acquired epileptic aphasia classically develops in healthy children who acutely or progressively loose receptive and expressive language ability coincidentally with the appearance of paroxysmal Electro Enchepalo gram (EEG) changes. At present, LKS is considered as a part of the syndrome of electrical status epilepticus in sleep, which is also known as continuous spike and wave during slow wave sleep. It is a rare childhood neurological syndrome. In this article, hereby, we report a case of a 7-year-old female child with LKS and unique characteristics.


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