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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2021  |  Volume : 16  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 354-356

Critical appraisal of curriculum content for Bachelor Of Science in intensive care technology under faculty of allied health sciences, Datta Meghe Institute of Medical Sciences (Deemed to be University) as Against Subject Centricity


1 Department of Radiodiagnosis, Jawaharlal Nehru Medical College, Wardha, Maharashtra, India
2 Department of Biochemistry, Jawaharlal Nehru Medical College, Wardha, Maharashtra, India
3 Department of Physiology, Jawaharlal Nehru Medical College, Wardha, Maharashtra, India

Correspondence Address:
Gaurav Vedprakash Mishra
Associate Professor, Department of Radiodiagnosis, Jawaharlal Nehru Medical College, Wardha
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/jdmimsu.jdmimsu_292_21

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Background: The specialty of intensive care of patients, also known widely as “critical care medicine” is one that includes how to properly look after and take care of patients who are critically ill. In the academic year 2020–2021, an undergraduate course curriculum on intensive care technology was launched in the Faculty of Allied Health Sciences, Datta Meghe Institute of Medical Sciences (Deemed to be University), the curricular inclusions for which were the document of interest for the present study. It is vital to determine the standing of the curriculum prepared for a new course for undergraduates with regard to its centricity– learner based, subject based or problem based. Here, the cognitive domain can be viewed in the subject based inclusions. The present study attempts to delineate the curricular inclusions for the said curriculum of Bachelor of Science in Intensive Care Technology under Faculty of Allied Health Sciences, Datta Meghe Institute of Medical Sciences (Deemed to be University) as against typing of curriculum based on subject centricity. Materials and Methods: Rapid review of the literature with reference to the curriculum of Bachelor of Science in Intensive Care Technology under Faculty of Allied Health Sciences, Datta Meghe Institute of Medical Sciences (Deemed to be University) in the academic year 2020–2021 for purpose of their “typing” with principles of curriculum design' was done. Results: According to principles of curricular design by Schweitzer based on centricity of curriculum, the curricular inclusions were divided into three types–subject centred inclusions, problem-centered inclusions and learner-centered inclusions. The total number of curricular inclusions was 539. Ideally taking the ratio of curricular inclusions as 6:3:1, there should be 323 subject-centered inclusions, 162 problem-centered inclusion, and 54 learner centered. Out of this, there were 313 inclusions which were observed to be subject centred, 206 inclusions were problem centered and 20 were centred upon the learner. Thus, the overall percentage of typing of the inclusions was 58.07% subject centricity, 38.21% problem centricity and 3.7% learner centricity. The observed deficit of inclusions in subject centricity was 10, a surplus of 44 inclusions was observed in problem-centered inclusions whereas the learner-centered inclusions showed a deficit of 34 objectives. Conclusion: The undergraduate course curriculum of Bachelor of Science in Intensive Care Technology under Faculty of Allied Health Sciences included in the present study for typing of included curricular inclusions has been typed based on their centricity upon the subject.


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