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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2020  |  Volume : 15  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 364-367

Knowledge and awareness regarding giving do-not-resuscitate orders among resident doctors in various intensive care units of a rural tertiary care center


1 Intern, Jawaharlal Nehru Medical College, Datta Meghe Institute of Medical Sciences (Deemed to be University), Sawangi(M), Wardha, Maharashtra, India
2 Department of Medicine, Jawaharlal Nehru Medical College, Datta Meghe Institute of Medical Sciences (Deemed to be University), Sawangi(M), Wardha, Maharashtra, India
3 Department of Pathology, Jawaharlal Nehru Medical College, Datta Meghe Institute of Medical Sciences (Deemed to be University), Sawangi(M), Wardha, Maharashtra, India
4 Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Jawaharlal Nehru Medical College, Datta Meghe Institute of Medical Sciences (Deemed to be University), Sawangi(M), Wardha, Maharashtra, India

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Aditya Khandekar
Jawaharlal Nehru Medical College, Sawangi (Meghe), Wardha - 442 001, Maharashtra
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/jdmimsu.jdmimsu_118_19

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Background: Bioethics is a subject rarely taught, or discussed in residency. This can often result in a lack of awareness regarding patient rights and decision-making policies, especially amongst residents working in such high dependency units. To improve awareness regarding patient ethics, a study was thus conducted in AVBRH under the Dept. of Internal Medicine, to assess knowledge, aptitude and awareness of Residents working in Critical Care Units across the tertiary care centre. Aim and Objectives: To assess knowledge, aptitude and awareness of Residents working in Critical Care Units across the tertiary care centre. Methodology: The study was a cross-sectional study conducted across a period of two months, from 1st April 2019 to 1st June 2019. Study participants included 50 residents working in critical care units across multiple Departments of the Tertiary Care centre, with inclusion criteria being 1st, 2nd and 3rd Year Junior residents who consented to participate in the study. Questionnaires were distributed to residents containing 10 multiple choice questions based on often-used terms with reagards to ethics, including DNR (Do Not resuscitate), 'respect of autonomy', and 'best interest standards' of a patient, and included clinical case scenarios on decision-making in emergency and ICU settings. On completion of filling of the questionnaire by all residents, data was entered into Microsoft Excel v. 2010, and responses were assessed based on percentages of residents that got each question right. Results: Results showed that while >50% residents scored correct answers on the clinical-based scenarios of critical care, aptitude regarding terminologies and decision-making ethics, including patient rights in such scenarios, needed considerable improvement, as no more than 30%. Conclusion: Thus, there is a need to inculcate bioethics-based learning into residency in today's times, which will directly result in better decision-making practices.


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