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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2020  |  Volume : 15  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 168-171

Study of free radicals and antioxidant status in human immunodeficiency virus-positive patients


1 Department of Biochemistry, Datta Meghe Medical College, Shalinitai Meghe Hospital and Research Centre, Nagpur, India
2 Department of Biochemistry, Jawaharlal Nehru Medical College, Datta Meghe Institute of Medical Sciences (Deemed to be University), Sawangi (Meghe), Wardha, Maharashtra, India
3 Department of Microbiology, Jawaharlal Nehru Medical College, Datta Meghe Institute of Medical Sciences (Deemed to be University), Sawangi (Meghe), Wardha, Maharashtra, India

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Rakesh Kumar Jha
Department of Biochemistry, Datta Meghe Medical College, Shalinitai Meghe Hospital and Research Centre, Wanadongri, Hingana, Nagpur - 441 110, Maharashtra
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/jdmimsu.jdmimsu_114_20

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Introduction: Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) stands for immunodeficiency virus in humans. HIV destroys the immune system of the body, phasing out its capacity to combat diseases and other cancers. HIV can develop into acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) when left untreated. It is the severest HIV level and is typically fatal. There is no treatment for HIV at this moment. This can take as long as 10 years to experience more serious symptoms after the infection. A person with <200 cells/mm3 is beginning to develop severe infections called opportunistic diseases and is moving toward AIDS. A free radical can be described as any molecular species capable of independent life in an atomic orbital that contains an unpaired electron. Antioxidants function as a radical scavenger, a donor of hydrogen, a donor of electrons, a decomposer of peroxides, a single quencher of oxygen, an inhibitor of enzymes, a synergist, and a metal chelator. In the intracellular and extracellular environment, both enzymatic and nonenzymatic antioxidants exist for detoxification of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Aim: The aim was to study the free radicals and antioxidant status in HIV-positive patients. Materials and Methods: The present study includes a total of sixty participants that include thirty HIV-positive patients and thirty healthy individuals. Blood samples collected from the participants were obtained for serum glutathione reductase (GSH), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and malondialdehyde (MDA) estimation. Results: The GSH, SOD, and MDA levels in HIV-positive patients were statistically significant. Conclusion: ROS was described as playing a critical role in accelerating and regulating AIDS development. In addition, it was found that antioxidant depletion was a typical sign at the onset of HIV infection, resulting in extreme OS.


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