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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2020  |  Volume : 15  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 1-6

Determinants for accessing emergency obstetric care services at peripheral health facilities in a block of Wardha district, Maharashtra: A qualitative study


Department of Community Medicine, Jawaharlal Nehru Medical College, Datta Meghe Institute of Medical Sciences (Deemed to be University), Wardha, Maharashtra, India

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Sarika Dakhode
Department of Community Medicine, Jawaharlal Nehru Medical College, Datta Meghe Institute of Medical Sciences (Deemed to be University), Wardha, Maharashtra
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/jdmimsu.jdmimsu_209_19

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Background: In India, emergency obstetric care (EmOC) services were started under RCH-II program (2004) with the goal to reduce maternal mortality ratio <100/lakh live births and increase institutional deliveries to at least 80% by 2010. Implemented strategy was to enhance availability and accesses to EmOC services. Objective: This study was conducted in one of the blocks of Wardha district in Maharashtra to understand the accessibility for providing EmOC services at primary health center and rural hospital in the last 1 year. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional qualitative study was conducted from May 2018 to October 2018. Data were collected by key informant interviews of service providers. Notes were transcribed and then translated into English. Respondents' verbatim that is significant and illustrative as per the theme of the study was used for analysis. Results: Equipment and drugs essential for EmOC were available; however, most of these were underutilized due to lack of skill in selected facilities. Basic EmOC training pattern was found inadequate in duration and practical skill. Training and recruitment of staff constantly were observed challenging for higher stakeholders. Of all EmOC signal functions, only parental antibiotics, oxytocics, and assisted vaginal delivery (episiotomy) were provided. Conclusion: Although building infrastructure, drugs, equipment, and transportation facilities were accessible, needy women may fail to receive timely and quality EmOC, due to lack of trained staff, low confidence, and lack of motivation in managing obstetric emergencies.


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