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ORAL ABSTRACT
Year : 2019  |  Volume : 14  |  Issue : 5  |  Page : 1-53

Oral Abstract


Date of Web Publication12-Jul-2019

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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0974-3901.262660

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How to cite this article:
. Oral Abstract. J Datta Meghe Inst Med Sci Univ 2019;14, Suppl S1:1-53

How to cite this URL:
. Oral Abstract. J Datta Meghe Inst Med Sci Univ [serial online] 2019 [cited 2021 Dec 4];14, Suppl S1:1-53. Available from: http://www.journaldmims.com/text.asp?2019/14/5/1/262660




  Oral 001 Top



  Effectiveness of Self-Instructional Module on Knowledge Regarding Management of Selected Minor Ailments of Preschool Children among Anganwadi Workers Top


Pranali Bhoyar

JNMC, Sawangi (M), Wardha, Maharashtra, India

Background: Healthy development of children is an investment in the national development and productivity. The importance of ensuring child health, as an investment for future cannot be ignored. The developments of many countries have yielded little when this aspect has been overlooked. A productive and energetic population cannot grow from unhealthy children who are chronically affected by repeated minor ailments. It is absolutely essential to protect the child’s health to build a sound foundation for the health of the nation. Preschool children are prone to various minor ailments. Objective: To assess the knowledge regarding management of selected minor ailments of preschool children among Anganwadi Workers. To assess the effectiveness of self-instructional module on knowledge regarding management of selected minor ailments of preschool children among Anganwadi Workers. To associate the post-test knowledge score with selected demographic variables. Methodology: This study was based on Pre experimental one group pre-test post-test research design. In this study, 100 anganwadi workers are included. This study was conducted at different Anganwadi centres. The sampling technique used in this study was nonprobability purposive sampling technique. Data was collected by using structured questionnaires. Results: In pre-test 2(2%) of the anganwadi workers were having poor knowledge, 37(37%) of them had average and 61(61%) had good level of knowledge score. The minimum score in pre-test was 5 and the maximum score was 15, the mean score for the pre-test was 10.93± 2.257 with a mean percentage score of 43.72% whereas in post-test 1 (1%) of the women were having very good knowledge and only 99 (99%) of them had excellent level of knowledge score. The minimum score in post-test was 20 and the maximum score was 25, the mean score for the post-test was 24.05±0.892 with a mean percentage score of 96.2% .Studies shows comparison of pre-test and post-test knowledge scores Mean, standard deviation and mean difference values are compared and student’s paired‘t’ test is applied at 5% level of significance. Hence it is statistically interpreted that Self-Instructional Module on overall knowledge regarding management of selected minor ailment of pre-school children among Anganwadi workers who attended was effective. Thus, the H1 is accepted. Conclusion: The result of this study shows that Anganwadi workers had excellent knowledge in the post-test. To find the effectiveness of self-instructional module ‘t’ test was applied and t value was calculated, post test score was significantly higher at 0.05 level than that of pre-test score. Thus, it was concluded that SIM on cervical cancer was found effective as a teaching strategy.

Keywords: Anganwadi, knowledge, preschool children


  Oral 002 Top



  Awareness and Ethical Views of Medical Students on Surrogacy Top


Akanksha Thakre

Indira Gandhi Government Medical College, Nagpur, Maharashtra, India

Background: In recent past India had become one of the booming industry for surrogacy attracting rich couples from all over the world. It is a 400 million dollar industry with about 3000 fertility clinics all over India. A recent surrogacy bill was enforced to put an end to the unethical surrogacy going rampant in India. The surrogacy bill 2018 has banned commercial surrogacy and allows the altruistic surrogacy. Society and health care professionals have mixed feelings about this law. Issues like fashion surrogacy, forced surrogacy as a means to earn a livelihood and cross-border surrogacy has turned this ‘treatment’ option into human trafficking. But one can never overlook the opportunity it provided the infertile women, single parents and same-sex marriage couples to have children of their own ‘blood’ as some may call it. This research studies the point of view of medical students about surrogacy and their awareness about the current laws. Objectives: (1) To assess the ethical views of medical students on surrogacy. (2) To assess the awareness about current trends and status of surrogacy in India among medical students. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted among the medical students in Nagpur. A questionnaire was prepared and forwarded to all the students. A consent was drawn up explaining the scope and limitations of this research and further urged students to fill the questionnaire by their free will. Results: Of the responses received: 90.9% believed that surrogacy was ethical. Only 19.1% knew about the current surrogacy laws. 76.4% believed that earning money through surrogacy was ethical. 93.6% thought that it was ethical for the commissioned family to pay for life insurance and other aides for the surrogate mother. 40% believed that altruistic surrogacy was ethical in contrast to commercial. 10% thought that sex-selective surrogacy was ethical. 80% felt that they lacked basic knowledge about surrogacy [types and other components].

Keywords: Awareness, ethics, surrogacy


  Oral 003 Top



  A Survey of Drinking Water Practices at Household Level in Sukhlibai Village, Wardha, Maharashtra Top


Saloni Agrawal, Sarika Dakhode

JNMC, Sawangi (M), Wardha, Maharashtra, India

Aims and Objective: To assess the domestic water practices at household level in Sukhlibai village. Methodology: A community based cross sectional study was conducted in Sukhlibai village during August 2018. Population of Village: approx. 2000, No. of household: 392 houses. Data Collection: Questionnaire was prepared for assessing the domestic water practices at household level by using NFHS 4 (2015-16) Performa. This tool contains questions regarding source, storage, purification and withdrawal of water from container for domestic purposes at household level. 96 household was the sample size which is calculated by using NFHS 4 data and was rounded up to 100. Household were selected by systematic random sampling method. Results: Majority of the houses in village are nuclear (55%), joint (40%) and few extended families (5%). Most houses (55.2%) were pakka, 20% semipakka and remaining katcha. Socioeconomic status of the families is diverse, 19% families earn <Rs 2500/ month and 33% earn Rs 2500-5000/month, rest > Rs 5000/month. Water supply was available in house, mostly in the yard and it was the most used source for drinking purpose (68%), 36% houses use public tap/hand pump. For 48.5% of the houses it takes < 5 min to fetch water from the source and >15 min for 3.8% houses. It was observed that 69.4% families use cloth/net for filtration of water and only 15.3% boils water. Bleaching powder was used in 9.6% houses and none were using chlorine drops. Every family were using covered container for the storage of water. Utensils like glass, jug etc are used in 74% houses for the withdrawal of water for drinking and cooking purpose from the storage container. Conclusions: In studied village water withdrawal from stored container and purification method was quiet unsatisfactory which was limited up to draining of drinking water by using cloth/net. Only provision of safe drinking water is not sufficient to improve health status of community. Hence, awareness program regarding importance and methods of water purification at household level, along with safe water withdrawal should be conducted. Villagers can be suggested to use container with tap for drinking water storage purpose.

Keywords: Community, domestic water, household


  Oral 004 Top



  Assessment of Blood Pressure Variability in Post-Menopausal Women Top


Aayushi Jain, Sunil Kumar

Department of Medicine, JNMC, Sawangi (M), Wardha, Maharashtra, India

Blood pressure variability represents an independent risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. In fact, the degree of hypertension-related end organ damages such as left ventricular hypertrophy, atherosclerosis, cerebrovascular disorders with cognitive decline, microalbuminuria and progressive renal failure reflects both daily life mean blood pressure levels and Blood pressure variability in 24 hours. Determinants of blood pressure variability are not fully understood. Many reports suggest that alterations in sympathetic regulative functions may predispose individuals to abnormal high blood pressure fluctuations. Dramatic decrease of estrogen production in menopause interferes with many metabolic pathways leading to insulin resistance, increased body mass index and dislypidemia. To detect possible blood pressure variability changes from fertile to menopausal status, we will enroll consecutively 100 women: 50 fertile women and 50 menopausal women. We will evaluate for each patient the body mass index, neck circumference, 3 time 6AM, 12PM and 7PM systolic and diastolic mean blood pressure values.

Keywords: Blood pressure, menopause, women


  Oral 005 Top



  Importance of Inculcating Basic Life Support Training Across All Graduate Courses Top


Ayushi Shastri

JNMC, Sawangi (M), Wardha, Maharashtra, India

Background: Basic life support (BLS) is a level of medical care which is used for victims of life-threatening illnesses or injuries until they can be given full medical care at a hospital. It can be provided by trained medical personnel, including emergency medical responders, paramedics, and by qualified bystanders. It includes knowledge and skills in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), using automated external defibrillators (AED) and relieving airway obstructions in patients of every age. It can be initiated on a victim of drowning, sudden cardiac and respiratory arrest, chocking or unconsciousness. Concept: Immediately in the aftermath of a road traffic accident, a sudden cardiac arrest or any emergency, bystanders usually form the earlier than early response. Proper training in not only basic life support but first aid skills can provide them with the confidence to intervene. People in the 15-65 age group account for more than 60% of the population of India. The age profile of road traffic accident victims for 2011 reveals that the age group of 25-65 accounts for 51.9% of all the casualties, closely followed by people in the age group of 15-24 years with 30.3% of casualties Developed countries like the USA, France and UK teach these life saving courses in the high school curriculum. It can be one of the reasons for an almost half fatality rate of deaths due to sudden cardiac arrests in these countries in comparison to developing ones. Decent knowledge and awareness of steps of BLS enables a person to effectively resuscitate a victim and can save a life in those crucial minutes when medical help is on the way. The AHA guided and certified courses require around 2-3 days for teaching and can easily be included in the curriculum of almost every graduate/university level course there is. Conclusion: BLS requires nothing as far as resources are concerned but proper CPR doubles or triples the rate of survival and can make the difference between life and death. For the expense of an extra training period of 3 days each year, lives can be saved in an emergency.

Keywords: Basic Life support, emergency, training


  Oral 006 Top



  How to Deal with a Difficult Patient? Top


Anusha Gupta

Department of Medicine, JNMC, Sawangi (M), Wardha, Maharashtra, India

Patients who evoke emotional reactions in the family physician tend to be labeled “difficult”. Difficult patients have been identified as those who invoke negative feelings. These people elicit intense fear, anger, hatred, and frustration from most physicians. The difficult patient might be one who “yes … but” ‘s every suggestion, or who demands that the physician provide something inappropriate, like drugs or an unjustifiable letter. Whenever such an interaction occurs, the family physician can expect aggravation, frustration and, often, anger, and the results are likely to be unsatisfactory for both doctor and patient. Why do some patients evoke negative emotions in their doctors? Physicians expect their patients’ behavior to conform to the sick-role model. The ideal patient suffers from an acute, treatable illness (preferably an interesting one) and is suitably grateful when returned to good health. Any deviation by the patient from this model may elicit negative reactions from the physician Dealing with difficult patients can represent a significant burden in the life of doctors. It is more productive, however, to view this burden as a product of the interaction between doctor and patient, for which both have a responsibility, rather than attributing any problems encountered to shortcomings of the patient alone. There is a risk in such situations of potentially harmful over-medicalisation. Much is known about the factors that contribute to successful and unsuccessful clinical transactions. The awareness of what doctors bring both as professionals and as individual people to this interaction, will count as much as the practical clinical efforts made towards helping patients. While in many larger centres emergency medical care is now provided by full-time emergency physicians, family physicians working part-time in emergency departments and on-call for their own patients provide much of the manpower for this important aspect of primary care. Some patients, despite the most sincere and committed efforts of their doctors, seem to be beyond the reach of medical help, and yet persist in seeking it. Sharing problems with colleagues can both lighten the burden and be a source of valuable insight into the stalemate that so often exists. Other members of the primary healthcare team and the practice staff should be involved in order to develop a consistent approach towards such patients.

Keywords: Difficult patient, ethics, physician


  Oral 007 Top



  A Study of Strategies Used For Breaking Bad News in Government Medical Colleges of Nagpur Top


Aditya H. Yawalikar

Government Medical Colleges, Nagpur, Maharashtra, India

Background: The way a bad news is delivered can significantly affect how patients might see their situation, an empathetic physician has a better chance of having the patient follow up regularly for treatment. In recent years we’ve seen a growing number of cases of patients’ families assaulting doctors, blaming them for ill-patient care. This might partly be due to a lack of empathy among physicians, which is perceived as carelessness. Standard protocols for breaking bad news are a way towards preserving human dignity and empathize with the patients. Objectives: Our objective is to find if different methods like the SPIKES, ABCDE and BREAKS protocol are used for breaking bad news in Government Hospitals of Nagpur. Methodology: Sample: The sample of the study comprises of 61 subjects: 30 doctors and 31 patients. The selection of patients was made from those who were recently diagnosed to have cancer and doctors were selected from residents from IGGMCH and GMCH Nagpur. Tools: Two self-structured questionnaires, one for doctors asking if they follow proper protocol and one for patients asking if certain steps of protocol were followed while they received the bad news. Procedure: Prior to giving the questionnaire, a rapport was built with the patients and their permission for asking questions was sought for. They were explained the questions in their vernacular language. Doctors were provided a questionnaire after their willingness to answer was sought. Statistical analysis was made using chi-square test. Results: Six aspects of SPIKES protocol were tested in the questionnaires and we found significant difference (p<0.05) in the responses of doctors and patients in the following points: Doctors asking patients whether they have an understanding of their disease: 80.6% patients said they were not asked and 76.7% doctors said they do ask. Doctors asking patients how much information they need regarding their disease: 93.5% patients said they were not asked and 43.3% doctors said they do ask. Doctors announcing that “there’s a bad news” before telling it: 58.1% patients said it was not announced and 80% doctors said they do announce. No significant difference was found in doctors telling the diagnosis to patients privately, allowing them to process their emotions and planning next steps in their management. No specific protocols for breaking bad news are followed according to the responses by doctors. Most (63.3%) state that they don’t use any protocol. Conclusion: The significant discrepancies in the responses of doctors and patients with regard to doctors asking the patients’ understanding of their disease, asking them how much do they want to know and announcing that there’s a bad news before telling it, may suggest that the Government Hospitals of Nagpur are falling short at these three ethical positions.

Keywords: Breaking bad news, hospital, patient, ethics


  Oral 008 Top



  Depression Literacy, Personal Stigma and Perceived Stigma about Depression: A Comparative Study of Nursing Student and Staff from Rural Central India Top


Sakshi Gupta, G. K. Vankar

Department of Psychiatry, JNMC, Sawangi (M), Wardha, Maharashtra, India

Introduction: Depression is a common illness globally affecting more than 300 million people. Depression as a emotion is universal experienced by all human being, however when it lasts for more than two weeks, when is severe enough to impair academic, occupational and social functioning besides producing immense distress it may become a disorder. At its worst, depression can lead to suicide. About 800,000 people die of suicide every year. Suicide is the second leading cause of death in youth of 15-29-year age group. More than 80% who die of suicide are suffering from depression and 15% persons with major depression kill themselves. About 70% mentally ill do not receive any treatment. The reasons include ignorance about the clinical features and treatability of psychiatric disorders, lack of knowledge about how to seek treatment, prejudice against people who have psychiatric disorder, and expectations of discrimination against people who have a diagnosis of such disorder. Additionally trained mental health personnel - psychiatrists, psychiatric nurses, clinical psychologists and psychiatric social workers are scarce further widening the treatment gap. National Mental Health Program has therefore a component of training doctors as well as nurses in general health care for providing basic psychiatric interventions in primary health care itself. The stigma can be personal i.e. a person’s own personal attitude to depression and perceived stigma (person’s belief about the stigmatising attitude of others). In a multicentre international study, 20–37% of persons with depression in India had stopped themselves from doing something important because of anticipated discrimination (“why try” effect). The study also found discrimination experience (enacted stigma) for depression in 79% with significant impact on family, work, or social relationships. The study paradoxically found that family members were the main source of discrimination, who were also the source of most reported support. The findings of such a study will provide information about knowledge gaps and attitudes which need to be corrected by appropriate interventions for nursing students and staff. Objective: To find out depression literacy among nursing students and staff, To find out personal stigma and perceived stigma among nursing students and staff, To find out relationship of level of depression literacy and a personal and perceived stigma.

Keywords: Depression, mental health, nursing


  Oral 009 Top



  Evaluation of Cardiovascular Autonomic Nervous Functions in Prediabetics: Study in a Rural Teaching Hospital Top


Amit Baheti

Department of Psychiatry, JNMC, Sawangi (M), Wardha, Maharashtra, India

Introduction and Objectives: Cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN) is a least understood and under diagnosed complication of diabetes which can also be seen in prediabetics. It causes resting tachycardia, orthostatic hypotension, and exercise intolerance and is associated with higher cardiovascular mortality. This stresses the need of early diagnosis of CAN to take early steps in preventing the mortality rates. Materials and Methods: Twenty five cases of prediabetes with no clinical evidence of cardiac disease were subjected to cardiac autonomic function (CAF) tests according to Ewing’s criteria which included heart rate (HR) variability during deep breathing, Valsalva maneuver ratio, HR response on standing, blood pressure (BP) response to standing, and BP response to sustained handgrip to find the prevalence of CAN. Results: In this study, among 50 patients (25 case and 25 control), we found CAN in 16%. Out of which, parasympathetic neuropathy was seen in 12% of cases, and sympathetic neuropathy was seen in 10% of cases. CAF tests of HR variability during deep breathing, Valsalva maneuver ratio, HR response to standing, BP response to standing, and BP response to sustained handgrip found abnormal response in 14%, 10%, 12%, 08%, and 06%, respectively. Conclusion: Prevalence of CAN among prediabetics was 16%, and parasympathetic CAF tests are more sensitive for the detection of CAN than sympathetic CAF tests. Development of CAN in prediabetic patients may lead to increased morbidity; hence, they should be routinely evaluated for CAN using these bedside tests.

Keywords: Cardiovasacular, diabetes, neuropathy


  Oral 010 Top



  Prediction of Mortality in NICU of Tertiary Care Rural Hospital by Using Score for Neonatal Acute Physiology with Perinatal Extension-II Top


Shruti Chaudhary, Ashish Varma

Department of Psychiatry, Jawaharlal Nehru Medical College, Wardha, Maharashtra, India

Background: Neonatal mortality is very in India. The complains of neonatal illnesses are notthat obvious, so by the time an illness is diagnosed, the neonates become critically ill. Hence, an objective scale is required. Aims and Objectives: To predict mortality of neonates in NICU by using SNAPPE II (Score for Neonatal Acute Physiology with Perinatal Extension-II) and To study correlation of SNAPPE II score and mortality of neonates. Materials and Methods: Infrastructure: The study will be conducted in Neonatal ICU of Jawaharlal Neharu Medical College and Acharya Vinoba Bhave Rural Hospital, Sawangi (M), Wardha Duration of study: 2 years .From August 2018 to July 2020 Sample size: Type of study: Prospective observational study Ethical Committee aproval: The Institutional Ethical Committe permission will be saught to conduct this study before data collection. Inclusion criteria: All newborns coming to NICU with birth weight less than 1500 gm Exclusion criteria: (1) Neonates going discharged against medical advice and referred patients. (2) Congenital malformations. Procedure of study: All patients getting admitted to NICU with less than 1500 gms were examined for following 9 parameters to award specific points depending on observations on neonatal reports within first 12 hours of NICU stay. Depending on those points we got cumulative score by summation of points of these 9 parameters. The neonates who had higher score was considered to be more prone for mortality. Our prediction and the actual outcome in the form of survival and non survival was compared. Results: In this study,16 neonates were included of which 10 were male, gender ratio found to be 1.25:1. The average score for each parameter were as followed: Mean BP- 149, temp- 146, pO2/fiO2- 217, ph- 127, seizure- 76, U/O- 84 APGAR- 72, weight- 57, SGA- 12. Overall total score was 940 with average of 58.7. the average score in death cases was 97 while in discharged cases 54. Out of 16 patient, deaths were 2 & 14 discharge. Conclusion: the score for dead patients was more than survived.

Keywords: Neonatal mortality, SNAPPE II score


  Oral 011 Top



  Music Therapy in Neonates Top


Ashi Jain, Kratika Upadhyay

Department of Paediatrics, JNMC, Sawangi (M), Wardha, Maharashtra, India

Aim: This study aims to evaluate vocal and music in preventing pain in newborn babies. Objectives: (1) to use NIPS score while BCG immunisation. (2) To use above score while using vocal and strumental music during BCG Immunisation (3) to compare above scores. Place: Post natal ward of AVBRH Subjects: Normal term new-born. Inclusion criteria: All new-borns in postnatal ward. Exclusion criteria-preterm and sick babies. Methods: Total of 50 patients were studied. They all were scored using Nips score before immunisation. First group was scored without any intervention. 2nd group with vocal and 3rd with instrumental music during immunisation. The scores were compared. Music therapy was found to be useful in reducing pain. Conclusion: Music therapy was found to be useful for reducing pain in newborns.

Keywords: Music therapy, newborn, pain


  Oral 012 Top



  To Prevent the Negligence of a Phlebotomist by Studying the Variations in the Pattern of Viens of Cubital Fossa Top


Gaurav Sahu

Department of Surgery, JNMC, Sawangi, Wardha, Maharashtra, India

Aims and Objectives: The sole purpose of this study was to find the different variations in the pattern of cubital fossa in the Indian subjects which was investigated using tourniquet. The 50 Indian subjects were randomly chosen from the patients and staff of the JNMC, Wardha, Maharashtra. After excluding the inappropriate cases for detecting venous pattern, we collected 50 cases of right upper limbs and 50 cases of left upper limbs. The superficial veins of the cubital fossa were detected and classified into four types according to the presence of the median cubital vein. The type I, was found most common (52 upper limbs, 52.0%). Although the most common type in male and female was different as type II (24 upper limbs, 48.0%) and type I (29 upper limbs, 58.0%), respectively, statistical significance was not detected. Among 50 subjects who were observed the venous pattern in the both upper limbs, 16 subjects (32.0%) had the same venous pattern. Our results might be helpful for medical practitioner to be aware of the variation of the superficial cubital superficial vein. Materials and Methods: In this study 25 males and 25 females were randomly selected from among the patients and staff of JNMC, Wardha, Maharastra. All subjects were Indian aged between 20 and 70 years (mean, 45.5 years). Excluded were those with thick subcutaneous tissue layers which was not observed by torch. As a result, we collected 50 cases of right upper limbs and 50 cases of left upper limbs. After taking the subject’s consent, the superficial veins of the cubital fossa were made prominent by using tourniquet and by active movements of the forearm. The veins were marked on the skin and the pattern of veins in each case was accurately photographed which was identified with the name, sex and age of the subject; venous patterns on the right and left sides were noted separately. Small veins were ignored. All the drawings obtained were carefully studied and analyzed. Results: We found, type I was the most common type (52 upper limbs, 52.0%) while type II, III, and IV was found in 43(43.0%), 4 (4.0%), and 1 upper limbs (1.0%), respectively. Comparison in sexual difference, the most common type in male and female was different as type II (24 upper limbs, 48.0%) and type I (29 upper limbs, 58.0%), respectively. Discussion: The results from this study show that gender influence was not significant on the venous pattern of the cubital region of the upper limbs. The right and left side difference in both sexes was also not significant. Most medical practitioners are aware of two patterns of venous returns in the cubital fossa. So called N-type or type II in our study, which was present 38.0% of and 48.0% of males. Absence of the median cubital vein or communicating branch between the cephalic and basilic veins, type IV, was found in 1 upper limb in males. The type III, poor development of CV, was found in 2 upper limbs of females and in 2 upper limbs of males. Because of the low frequency of the venous patterns III and IV, however, it was not able to statistically interpret the results. Therefore, it needs to conduct further study including more subjects about gender influence or left-right symmetry of these two rare venous patterns in the cubital region.

Keywords: Negligence, phlebotomy, veins


  Oral 013 Top



  To Study Short Term Outcome in Neonates Referred to Tertiary Care Hospital Top


R. Abhilasha Singh Panwar, Keerti Swarnakar

Department of Paediatrics, JNMC, Sawangi (M), Wardha, Maharashtra, India

Background: In India neonatal mortality rate (NMR) is 24 per 1000 live births, (SRS 2018) and Neonatal death accounts for 56% of total under five child mortality. Perinatal and neonatal mortality rates are the major determinants of health care system. Thus analysis of pattern of neonatal mortality is of paramount importance in formulating preventive health services. Aims and Objectives: (1) To assess the factors affecting outcome in neonates referred to AVBRH. (2) To assess the causes of mortality in neonates referred to AVBRH. Methods: Patients admitted in the outborn section of the NICU were taken into the study. Detailed maternal history, natal history, mode of transport, care of neonate during transport were recorded. Examination finding at the time of admission, baseline investigations, prereferral treatment, treatment during this hospitalization, and outcome of the patient’s were tabulated and analysed. Results: Out of 75 newborns, 21.7% (n=16) died. Among them neonatal sepsis 62.7% (n=10), prematurity 37.5% (n=6), RDS 25% (n=4) and perinatal asphyxia 18.72% (n=3) were the main causes of death. Nearly 73.3% (n=55) neonates were transported in ambulance, rest 27.7% of the neonates were transported by private vehicle. Conclusion: A lot of modifiable risk factors are prevailing at the level of peripheral health centres that can be prevented. A higher fraction of neonatal deaths were associated with sepsis and prematurity among the referred neonates. Sepsis is one of the major cause of mortality in NICU. Hence proper precautions to be used to prevent sepsis. Early referral with adequate respiratory support and thermoregulation during transport of sick neonates should be kept in mind for better survival of referred neonates.

Keywords: Mortality, neonates, risk factors


  Oral 014 Top



  Influence of Work Characteristics on the Association between Doctor’s Stress and Sleep Quality Top


Rutuj Waghmare, Shobha Joshi

Jawaharlal Nehru Medical College, Datta Meghe Institute of Medical Sciences (Deemed to be University), Sawangi (Meghe), Wardha, Maharashtra, India

Background: It takes years of hard work, discipline and determination to become a doctor. Doctor’s stress has an implication for health and the satisfaction level of the doctor involved which eventually has an impact on the quality of care for the patients. Stress problems are one of the leading causes of sleep disturbance. Sleep is an integral part of health care because it affects all aspects of life: personal, social, and psychological. Objective: This study was designed with aim of Influence of work characteristics on the association between doctor’s stress and sleep quality. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted on doctors of Tertiary Care Hospitals of Wardha city for investigating the association of workplace stress and sleep quality in doctors using questionnaire. Questionnaire containing twenty-four questions was given to doctors. The components were: Demographic component, Global perceived stress scale (PSS) and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI). Demographic component like age, gender, the variables studied were gender, work shift. Ten questions were asked for stress evaluation and fourteen questions were asked for sleep evaluations of doctors. Questionnaire evaluates various sleeping quality related factor over previous one-month period. Descriptive analysis was carried out in order to evaluate the measures of the collected result. Results: It was observed that there was a statically significant positive correlation between PSS and PSQI. The total PSS scores were almost equalling in Post-graduates and Staff, males and females, day and night shifts duty doctors. Positive PSS scores slight difference was noted with males having little higher scores than females. However, for Negative PSS scores the females showed higher scores than males and this difference was statistically significant. Positive PSS scores slight difference was noted with day shift doctors having little higher scores than night shift. Total PSQI scores were almost equal in Post-graduates and Staff, males and females, day and night shift duty doctors. Workload and work shift have a direct effect on sleep quality and stress in individual. In our study we found that 100% of all the subjects have poor sleep quality. Conclusion: Our study findings relate that there was direct relationship between stresses and sleep quality which influences the work characteristics of Doctors. All the working doctors have slightly equal amount of stress which was influenced by sleep.

Keywords: Doctor, sleep quality, stress


  Oral 015 Top



  Study of Empathy among Doctors of Different Departments in a Tertiary Care Hospital Setting Top


Ananya Balachand, Shishir Kumar

K. S. Hegde Medical Academy, Mangalore, Karnataka, India

Background: Empathy is one of the most important trait that should be inculcated in doctor and all medical professionals. But in the present scenario, where consumerism has taken over our healthcare system, this trait is declining. Not many studies have been done in India regarding this even though globally this topic has gained importance. This study will give an idea on the trends of decline of empathy among doctors. This will also help in comparing empathy levels of doctors of different departments. Objectives: (1) To assess the empathy among doctors in a tertiary care hospital, (2) To compare empathy among doctors of different departments. Methods: The study involves 200 doctors including physicians working in different departments of a tertiary care hospital. They have completed Toronto empathy questionnaire, which is a reliable assessment of empathy using 16 questions. This method uses factor analysis to assess empathy among doctors. Results: This a short survey project and hasn’t completed yet. So the results are yet to be tallied. Conclusion: As per the studies that have been done globally, the empathy among medical professionals, especially doctors have been declining at a high rate. This study will give a model for comparison among doctors of different departments.

Keywords: Doctors, empathy, ethics


  Oral 016 Top



  Study of Menstrual Hygiene among Adolescent girls in a Rural Area Top


Aakruti Ganla, Supriya S. Patil, P. M. Durgawale

Krishna Institute of Medical Sciences, Karad, Maharashtra, India

Background: Adolescence in girls is marked by menstruation. The lack of mention of the topic leads to unawareness about the basic physiological phenomenon that occurs in every women’s life on a monthly basis. Good hygienic practices such as the use of sanitary pads and washing of the genital area are essential during menstruation. Objective: To assess the knowledge, sources of information and beliefs regarding menstruation among adolescent girls and identify hygiene practices and restrictions that are followed by adolescent girls during menstruation. Methodology: School based cross-sectional study was carried out in a rural school in Malkapur. Data was collected using a pre-designed questionnaire from 107 adolescent girls. Results: Among the 107 girls, maximum 56 (52.34%) were 14 years old. Maximum number of girls had menarche at 13 years – 42 (39.25%). 52 (48.60%) girls had no knowledge of menses prior to menarche. Source of information for the remaining 55 (51.40%) was mother for 40 (72.73%) of the girls. 72 (67.29%) girls commented that bleeding occurs from the uterus. 58 (54.21%) used sanitary pads while 18 (16.82%) used old cloth pieces. When menstrual hygiene practices were studied it was found that of the girls who used cloth pieces as absorbent 32 (29.91%) stored the same with their routine clothes. 40 (83.33%) girls dried the cloth outside the house in sunlight while 4 (8.33%) dried it inside their houses. 94 (87.85%) changed the absorbent multiple times daily irrespective of whether it was completely soaked. Absorbents were wrapped in newspaper and disposed by 88 (82.24%) girls. An unusual practice of burying used pads or cloths in the mud by 2 (1.87%) girls was observed. Multiple restrictions were practiced and only 22.43% girls did not have any restrictions. Conclusion: There is an urgent need for spread of awareness regarding menstrual hygiene practices especially in the rural area as it can play a major contributory role in uplifting overall health of adolescent girls and women in the region.

Keywords: Adolescents, hygiene, menstrual, rural


  Oral 017 Top



  Significance of Pulmonary Function Test in Children with Beta: Thalassemia Major Top


V. Karthik Raja, Logatharsan, Sneha Kahalekar, C. D. Aundhakar

Krishna Institute of Medical Sciences, Karad, Maharashtra, India

Background: Thalassemia is the most common hereditary hemoglobinopathy in children. As a management Repeated blood transfusion lead to iron overload in the body which cause iron deposition in organs such as liver, skin, heart, and pancreas including lungs where iron get deposited, which may result in parenchymal damage. In these patients, chronic ventilatory and cardiopulmonary abnormalities are seen. Reported abnormalities of lungs are varied which include restrictive lung disease, impaired diffusing capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide (DLCO), small airway disease and obstructive airway disease, lung abnormalities are most reported case in studies of patients with Beta- Thalassemia major. Hence, this study is to show the effects of chronic blood transfusion on lungs in Beta- Thalassemia by means of pulmonary function tests in paediatric age group. Objective: The present study was conducted to evaluate the Pulmonary Function Test [PFT] and the pattern of lung dysfunction which is restrictive or obstructive in multi-transfused beta- thalassemia patients aged between 5-15 years and to correlate the relation between pulmonary dysfunction and the serum ferritin levels. Methodology: It is cross sectional Observational study conducted in Tertiary Care Centre on children aged between 5-15 years registered in paediatric ward with Beta Thalassemia and receiving blood transfusion. Where all the patients were accessed for pulmonary function test, serum ferritin level, haemoglobin level, packed cell volume and anthropometry. Results: In the present study total 20 children suffering from beta thalassemia major were included. The average age of diagnosis is between 2-48 months. Out of which 11 (55%) were males and 9 (45%) were females. On analyzing the pulmonary function tests data out of 20, 11 (55%) patients were normal, 6 (30%) patients showed restrictive, 2 (10%) patients showed obstructive and 1 (5%) patient showed mixed restriction and obstruction. And the number of transfusions received by these patients being min. 30%, max. 76%, mean-53.20%. Serum Ferritin level was determined for all the patients, compared with normal patients and there was raised level of serum ferritin. Conclusion: As a conclusion, the results obtained from various tests and data collected from patients, Beta thalassemia patients who undergone multiple blood transfusion are more prone to abnormal pulmonary function test.

Keywords: Beta-thalassemia, children, pulmonary function test


  Oral 018 Top



  Knowledge, Awareness and Practice Regarding Attitude towards Human Immunodeficiency Virus AIDS Patients among Medical College Students Top


Nevin Tom

K. S. Hegde Medical Academy, Mangalore, Karnataka, India

Background: Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is a public health problem due to its high morbidity and mortality rates. And every day, the moral, social and ethical issues around AIDS patients and the medical as well as paramedical caretakers who attend to them. Many previous studies showed that a significant number of doctors, medical students and paramedical staff hinder from giving care to HIV positive patients. The reasons vary from personal risk to sociocultural and religious factors. Even in 2019, this issue brings forward a social stigma. The Medical Council of India, in a 2002 regulation had made it clear that all doctors have the duty, to provide impartial healthcare, to protect the patients’ confidentiality and safeguard his/her autonomy over their own health. These rights of the patient are legalized in the HIV/AIDS bill of 2007. However, it is doubtful that medical students are aware or if aware, adhere to these codes of conduct. Medical students are the future workforce of the health sector. Hence it is important to understand their outlook. Also, it is more likely that socially and economically well off patients are considered ‘sin free’ and others are blamed and socially isolated. Unequal healthcare service is a matter of social injustice. Objectives: (1) To understand the general attitude of medical students towards HIVAIDS patients. (2) To understand the knowledge of medical students about the general codes of conducts on their intercourse with AIDS patients as well as people accompanying them. (3) To study if attitude to such patients are affected by the socioeconomic background of the patient and the cultural background of the medical student. Methodology: The study will be a cross-sectional survey conducted among 100 medical college students who give informed consent to participate. The anonymity of the participants will be maintained. The sample size was calculated using convenience sampling. The data will be collected using a structured, guided interview-based questionnaire consisting of closed-ended questions. The researcher will be present during the survey to answer queries. No specific demographic patterns are applied to the participant population

Keywords: Awareness, clinical care, HIV, patients


  Oral 019 Top



  Health Care Ethics in Vaccination Top


Ashwini U. Patekar, Umesh Kawalkar

Government Medical College, Akola, Maharashtra, India

Background: The expanded program for Immunization (EPI) was launched in 1978 in India was further renamed as Universal Immunization Program (UIP) in 1985. With the targets of maximal coverage vaccines were also further added for pneumonia, meningitis and diarrhoea and it keeps being revised according to the diseases and their respective prevalence. National vaccine Policy in April 2011 with specific relevance to local vaccine not only needs to guide decision-making and a long-term plan to strengthen the vaccine program but also addresses broader issues like institutional framework, processes, evidence-based framework, vaccine security, program management, etc. Description of Concept: The ethical use and equitable access to prevention and care should be the basic mantra for any program trying to lessen the disease burden in the country. The selection of vaccines should be on the grounds of epidemiological evidence and cost-effectiveness. NIP can try and include the newer and more expensive vaccines to make them accessible to all. The principles of health care ethics are - respect of autonomy, nonmaleficence, beneficence and justice and others include Health maximisation, Efficiency and Proportionality. Public trust is fundamental to the success of vaccination programmes and even if it is built on a relationship of decades, cannot be taken for granted. Not only in India but elsewhere too, the misuse of vaccines and vaccination is being questioned. Trust in vaccines and vaccination is important. Sometimes a few reactions lead to a rumour and can hamper the main purpose of the programme which is beneficial in a large scale to the population. Also, people’s trust cannot be taken for granted, and that it gets further eroded by evidence of financial conflicts of interest in the healthcare system. Conclusion: The ethical issues in the development of vaccines and in vaccination attempts to forge a unity of public health and human rights by arguing that when a preventive health intervention is introduced for the population at large, questions the individual’s autonomy and the risks s/he confronts. The voluntariness for vaccination is not just morally correct preventive public health but also more efficacious as it makes for people’s genuine participation for the improvement of their health. Thus, here we discuss the ethical and equal distribution of the vaccines in the program as well as the encounters of the program with basic principles of medical ethics.

Keywords: Ethics, health, vaccination


  Oral 020 Top



  A Study of Correlation between Parenting Style and Behavioural Patterns in School Going Children Top


Ashish Kumar Shah

Department of Psychiatry, Jawaharlal Nehru Medical College, Datta Meghe Institute of Medical Sciences (Deemed to be University), Sawangi (Meghe), Wardha, Maharashtra, India

Background: Parenting styles affect children’s behaviour and other outcomes in life in multiple ways. This research provides an insight into the association between type of parenting style and behavioural changes in children can help us identify the reasons why some children have significant behavioural issues and difficulties during their school years. A study looking into the association between type of parenting style and behavioural changes in children can help us identify the reasons why some children have significant behavioural issues and difficulties during their school years. Such a finding will help us counsel the parents regarding the influence of the style of their parenting on the children and the need for change of approach. Objective: To assess the correlation between parenting style and behavioural patterns of school going children and to compare the behavioural patterns in children as perceived by the parents and teachers. Methodology: Questionnaire based study conducted on children of 3rd and 4th grade of a school in Wardha, Maharashtra were included with one of their parents and the class teacher who consented for the participation in the study. Semi Structured Proforma for Socio-Demographic Details were collected. The study questionnaires included PSDQ (Parenting style and dimensions questionnaire) to be filled in by the parent. Children were given MOPS (Measure of Parental Style). The class teacher was asked to assess the behavior of the child using SDQ (strength and difficulties questionnaire). Children with any diagnosed mental disorder were excluded. Results: PSDQ containing the three types namely Authoritative, authoritarian and permissive types of parenting style and the SDQ included assessment of various patterns such as internalizing, externalizing, conduct problem, hyperactivity, emotional, peer problem, prosocial score and impact score. This scale is used to assess the behavioural patterns of children according to the teacher, did not show any significant correlation with the child’s behavioral pattern. However the MOPS which assesses parenting style from child’s perspective on three aspects (indifference, abuse and overcontrol). It assesses the parenting style of both father and mother showed a positive correlation with behavioural problems in children. Conclusion: Parenting styles have definite impact on their child’s mental health. Authoritarian and permissive parenting styles, both are related to negative behavioural outcomes whereas authoritative parenting style is related with positive developmental outcomes. Thus, Parents can be counselled about the magnitude of effect they have on their children and how to modify it for the good.

Keywords: Behavioural pattern, children, parenting


  Oral 021 Top



  Effect of Lifestyle and Dietary Factors in Development of Brain Tumours Top


Nandini Bansal

Jawaharlal Nehru Medical College, Sawangi, Wardha, Maharashtra, India

Background: A brain tumour occurs when neurons are mutated and thus abnormal cells are formed .An association of development of brain tumour has been seen with cigarette smoking, wrong dietary habits, chronic stress, environmental pollution. Therefore, the present study was aimed at determining the effects of lifestyle and dietary habits in development of brain tumour .The study was carried out at Acharya Vinoba Bhave Rural Hospital, Sawangi(Meghe). Objectives: To assess the dietary factors in patients diagnosed with brain cancers. To assess the lifestyle factors in patients diagnosed with brain cancers. To assess the occupational factors and personal habits in patients diagnosed with brain tumour. Methods: A cross sectional study was conducted on 20 brain tumour patients for 3 months in 2018. Socio demography, dietary, occupational, lifestyle, and personal habit factors data was collected using structured questionnaire. Obtained data was statistically analysed using appropriate software. Result: Among subtypes 25% were glioblastoma, 10% were low grade astrocytoma, 10% were oligodendrioglioma, 5% were meningioma, 5% were opdivoglioblastoma. According to the location 25% had CP angle tumour, 10% had left thalamic glioma, 10% had multicentric glioma. Conclusion: People with stressful life, wrong diet, those with sedentary lifestyle, and those addicted to alcohol, with habit of cigarette smoking have higher risk of brain tumours. Males are more prone to brain tumours.

Keywords: Dietary Factors, lifestyle, tumours


  Oral 022 Top



  Knowledge, Attitude and Practice about Ethics in Palliative Care among Healthcare Professionals: A Cross-Sectional Study Top


Hanna Paul, Usha S. Adiga

K. S. Hegde Medical Academy, Mangalore, Karnataka, India

Background: Palliative care is an interdisciplinary approach to specialised medical and nursing care for people with life limiting diseases. The goal is to improve quality of life for both the patient and the family. There exists lack of proper training and awareness amongst health care professionals which hampers the delivery of quality care for terminally ill patients. Objective: Objective of the study is to assess the knowledge, attitude and practice of ethics in palliative care among healthcare professionals of Justice K.S. Hegde Charitable Hospital, Mangalore. Methodology: Study Setting: The study was carried among healthcare professionals of the Justice K.S.Hegde Charitable Hospital, Mangalore during last week of May and first week of June. Study Design: Cross-Sectional. Study Tool: Validated Questionnaire for assessing Knowledge, Attitude and Practice. Study Subjects and Sample Size: The study was conducted among the house surgeons, postgraduates of different departments and nurses. Total sample size is 170. Post-Graduates:12 Interns: 93 Nurses: 65 Ethical Issues: Participation was voluntary. Ethical committee permission taken. Results: The majority of respondents (70%) identified palliative care to be pain medicine, 27.1% thought it to be geriatric medicine while 33.5% of them felt palliative care is active care of dying.87.6% of respondents felt that end-of-life care should be given at patient’s home itself. 78.8% people responded that the diagnosis and prognosis should be communicated to the patient and patients are entitled to make choices regarding their end of life care.49.4% felt that physician assisted dying should be legalised. 75.29% of them agreed to the fact that there exists a profound shortage of palliative care clinicians. 31.8% were not sure about the legalisation of Do Not Resuscitate orders. Conclusion: Our study shows the gap in the knowledge of healthcare workers in the area of palliative care and their opinions in some of the much-debated topics like physician assisted dying and DNR orders. There is a need to introduce or reinforce the study of palliative care in the curriculum of medical doctors and nurses both at undergraduate and postgraduate levels.

Keywords: Ethics, palliative care, practice


  Oral 023 Top



  A Cross-Sectional Study of Knowledge, Attitude and Practice of Decision Making Capacity of Health Care Providers in Geriatric Care in a Tertiary Hospital Top


S. Nanda Malavika

K. S. Hegde Medical Academy, Mangalore, Karnataka, India

Background: Concern and support for older patients have become a matter of greatest importance. It is not easy for doctors to get the desired level of patient involvement and take decisions for older patients. Emphasizing trust and upgrading shared decision making are bound to have positive results on health status of elderly. Methodology: The study will be conducted among medical doctors working in Justice K S Hegde Charitable hospital. A cross sectional qualitative study using semi structured questionnaire will be used to assess the knowledge, attitude and practice of decision making capacity of doctors in geriatric care. (1) Ethical decision making is mandatory in the practice of geriatric medicine. (2) The foundation of the doctor-patient relationship in geriatric care rests on moral principles expressed in professional oaths that serve to protect and promote the interests and welfare of patients. (3) Even the most monotonous geriatric medical interactions involve weighing competing values and priorities to arrive at a management plan that is appreciable both from medical and moral aspects. (4) Health care providers acquire moral guidance from multiple sources including their personal upbringing and experiences, education, cultural traditions and religious beliefs (5) Providers may not be satisfactorily ready to carry out their unique, professional ethical obligations and to facilitate resolutions of ethical dilemmas in geriatrics. (6) In case of elderly patients, knowledge and skills of health care providers related to ethics in training and practice have shown to be highly variable and often insufficient. (7) Increasing attempts to educate health care providers regarding ethical dilemmas commonly encountered while treating elderly patients are important. (8) Care for elderly patients demands new ethical considerations in clinical practice that will frequently appear along with advances in medical technology and life-sustaining therapies. (9) Providers who care for geriatric patients may be more likely to encounter ethical issues that concern end of life care and quality of life questions. (10) Treatment must account more for medical, psychological, cognitive processes, and social aspects of elderly compared to younger patients. (11) The optimal management of elderly patients is hindered by a number of complications, including specific medical practice, the organization of care, and the individual physician’s appreciation of the patient as elderly. (12) There is a growing need for evidence-based evaluations to recognize their decision making capacity and competence. (13) Issues related to ability to consent, raise many difficult questions in geriatrics.

Keywords: Decision making capacity, geriatric care, health care providers


  Oral 024 Top



  Medical Cum Surgical Management of Jehovah’s Witness in India: An Ethical Dilemma for Healthcare Professionals? Top


Sharon Gigy

K. S. Hegde Medical Academy, Mangalore, Karnataka, India

Background: India is a secular country housing a myriad of social cultures, customs and religious beliefs. From the medical viewpoint, an important one to note is that of Jehovah’s witnesses. Jehovah’s witness individuals belong to a Christian movement that was founded in the USA in the 1870s. Although actual numbers are not known, it is estimated that about four individuals belong to Jehovah’s witness for every 1,00,000 population, and this ratio is expected to rise in the coming years. As such, there is a need for the medical community within India to become familiar with the customs that they follow and its repercussions both on the medical and ethical front. But why is the knowledge of their customs so necessary? Based on their religious beliefs and customs, individuals from this community refuse transfusion of blood or blood products, even in very critical situations where their life might be at stake. Parents also refuse transfusions for their children. The ethical concerns are further intensified due to the absence of proper legislation in place to deal with these issues. Description of Idea: Despite there being a substantial presence of this community within our nation, there has been very little to nil research on the concerns affecting them both ethically and medically. There is minimal mention of the same in medical literature as well. There are but a few case reports published regarding the ethical dilemmas faced by physicians treating children who belong to Jehovah’s witness community. In these instances, Sec. 89 IPC and Sec. 90 IPC were brought to limelight. Parents of the said children, after much deliberation, along with help from the hospital counselors agreed to comply with the treatment plan prescribed by the doctors then. Thus coming to a void conclusion for a uniform method to be set in place for future references. There is a lack of sufficient aptitude in the medical community when dealing with such ethical issues. Through this study, we shall attempt to analyze the knowledge, attitude, and practice of approach of the medical community towards this unique population. Towards this end the study undertaken shall try to highlight the areas of concern as well as the areas of faux pas amongst health care professionals. The study also attempts to emphasize the ethical dilemmas faced by health care providers during treatment of individuals belonging to Jehovah’s witness. Conclusion: Bioethics is governed by the principles of autonomy, justice, beneficence, and non-maleficence. It is difficult to find the correct balance amongst these four principles when the question of the approach to Jehovah’s witness and their customs come to light. In spite of the advances in technology, we have yet to come to follow a structured method of approach to this unique population whether it be in the surgery opd, emergency care, prenatal or even pediatric care. This accounts for further research on this delicate but pertinent issue.

Keywords: Dilemma, ethical, jehovah’s witness, management


  Oral 025 Top



  Ethical Issues of MTP: Where are We Lacking? Top


Navpreet Khurana

Indira Gandhi Government Medical College and Hospital, Nagpur, Maharashtra, India

Background: Following the implementation of MTP Act, 1971 India became one of the few countries to liberalize abortion rights. It was a well formulated and progressive Act, but has it kept pace with the technological advancements and the rising feminist culture all around the world? Despite of these policies, according to a study conducted by Guttmacher Institute, the number of abortions in India were estimated to be 15 million in 2015 as compared to the 701,415 that were actually recorded by the Ministry of Health and Welfare in 2014-2015 survey. The number of unsafe abortions were estimated to be 60% accounting for 8% of maternal mortality rate. These numbers portray a failure of utilization of existing facilities, lack of awareness and social pressure that leads women to resort to unsafe and illegal practices. Hence, it is in the hands of future physicians to safeguard the reproductive rights of women. Objective: (1) To assess whether medical students have the necessary knowledge, attitude and awareness about abortion ethics and laws. (2) To identify the shortcomings of India’s abortion policies and devising strategies to tackle its grave implications. Results: 40% were unaware of ethical principles of Autonomy and Justice. 62% believed embryo has a moral value. 13% identified themselves as pro-life. 92% believe India should have policies for abortions exceeding 20 weeks of gestation; mainly if mother’s health is at risk or if the fetus has a congenital anomaly. Only 65% believed that failure of contraceptives is a legal indication for abortion. 82% believe that more than 50% abortions are safe. Conclusion: Medical students learn about the MTP laws but not it’s ethical concerns, which is the need of the hour. This lack of awareness hinders them to give justice to the patients. We practice what we preach and if our education system fails to indoctrinate the moral and ethical concerns of abortion, would we be able to combat the issues of illegal abortions, female feticide, unsafe abortions and the ethical challenges that we face? We must continuously work towards reforming our policies and making sure that the future physicians are legally and ethically equipped.

Keywords: Ethics, medical termination of pregnancy


  Oral 026 Top



  Knowledge, Attitude and Practices Related to Healthcare Ethics among Medical Undergraduate and Postgraduate Students Top


Aleena Salim

K. S. Hegde Medical Academy, Mangalore, Karnataka, India

Background: Health care decisions are based not only on clinical and technical grounds, but also on ethical grounds. Medical ethics is one of the most important components of medical education. The importance of knowing medical ethics is very relevant to a medical professional due to a variety of reasons, including increasing litigation, changes in complexities in medical practice and the importance of consumer courts. Awareness regarding ethics has to be cultivated among students of medicine as they are the next generation doctors. It helps medical students to recognize the importance of being sensitive to ethical issues within everyday clinical practice and develop in them the ability to effectively address ethical concerns of patients and human beings. Objectives: Knowledge, Attitude and Practices Related to Healthcare Ethics among Medical Undergraduate and Postgraduate Students. Methodology: Study setting: K S Hegde Medical Academy, Mangalore. Study Design: Cross-sectional. Study Subjects: 135 undergraduates and 35 postgraduates from K S Hegde Medical Academy. Study Tool: Validated questionnaire was administered, and responses were collected. Results: 67.6 % of the respondents were aware of Hippocratic Oath. Majority of the subjects (79.9%) were familiar with Helsinki Declaration while 13.5 % were not knowledgeable about it. A great number (97.6%) of people think that knowledge of bioethics is important in their work. Majority think that ethics committee role is to ensure standard ethical practices among healthcare personnel.61.8% of people had never attended training in bioethics.42.3% were unaware about ICMR guidelines.18.7% of subjects haven’t taken informed consent. On assessing attitude of participants on healthcare ethics, 71.5% think that confidentiality can be maintained in modern health care.13% of the participants believe that consent is required only in case of operations.19.5% of the subjects are on the view that ethical conduct is important only for avoiding legal action. Conclusion: This study revealed that majority of the participants are aware of Helsinki Declaration and thinks that ethics committee role is to ensure standard ethical practices among healthcare personnel. This study also shows that majority had never attended training in bioethics. Conferences, symposium, and workshops, on healthcare ethics, may act as a means of sensitizing medical students. Ethics is already a part of medical curriculum, still students’ lack the knowledge of ethics. So evaluations for ethics need to be incorporated in the curriculum as EVALUATION DRIVES LEARNING.

Keywords: Ethics, healthcare, students


  Oral 027 Top



  Knowledge Attitude and Practice among Doctors in Upholding a Patients Autonomy in a Clinical Setting: A Pilot Study Top


D. Jyotsna

K. S. Hegde Medical Academy, Mangalore, Karnataka, India

Background: Patient autonomy is a fundamental principle of professional medical ethics. The ability to recognize and foster it, and its various dimensions, is widely considered an important clinical competency for physicians. However, its conception in the medical and ethical literature, as well as its practical implementation, still raises ongoing challenges for the practice of medicine. In a country like India where medicine is practiced in a paternalistic fashion where the health care provider influences the decision regarding the treatment it is necessary to know whether it affects patient care. Upholding autonomy. Objectives: (1) To know whether doctors are comfortable carrying out the treatment plan when full autonomy is given to the patient. (2) to know the reasons behind not giving the patient full autonomy over his/her health care. Methods: Study design: Cross sectional (QUESTIONNAIRE) Study site: K S HEGDE HOSPITAL Study population: Doctors of KS HEGDE HOSPITAL (100) Study period:june15-june30 Questionnaire: (1) In your opinion will it be beneficial for the patient and the caretakers when some information regarding complication is withheld to put patient at ease and improve the outcome? NEVER RARELY SOMETIMES OFTEN ALWAYS, (2) Have you ever presumed that the patient knows about the complications and side effects of the treatment given to him or her?, (3) Do you usually suggest all the alternative treatment measures with higher and lower risks so that he/she can decide their treatment plan?, (4) Do you agree and continue with the treatment when the patient chooses a treatment with more health risks after being informed about all the alternatives?, (5) According to your opinion, should an anxious patient be involved in decision making?, (6) In an anxious patient do you think their judgement will be clouded?, (7) In such like mentioned before cases do you think the caretakers should be given an opportunity to decide the treatment plan?, (8) Like the current system where the final decision is taken by the doctor,in your opinion is it more beneficial to all the patients? (9) In a terminally ill patient do you think that the complete autonomy of choosing DNR be given to the patient? (10) Do you think importance should be given to the patients social and cultural background? (11)What is your opinion regarding the fact that autonomy is thebasis for informed consent and advanced directives? (12) Do you think that the medical knowledge gained from unreliable sources like Internet affected patients decision making skills?

Keywords: Autonomy, doctors, patient, practice


  Oral 028 Top



  Ethical Issues Related to Umbilical Cord Blood Banking in India Top


Gouri Ramesh

K. S. Hegde Medical Academy, Mangalore, Karnataka, India

Background: Stem cells differ from all other types of cells in the human body because of their ability to multiply in order to self-perpetuate and differentiate into specialized cells. Stems cells could be totipotent, multipotent, pluripotent, oligopotent or unipotent depending on the type of cells that can arise or differentiate from them Umbilical cord blood (UCB) was once considered a waste product and was discarded with the placenta after delivery. With advances in medicine, it has been found to be a rich source of life-saving hematopoietic stem cells and has saved many lives in the recent decades. It is being used to treat various disorders like blood cancers, haemoglobinopathies and immunodeficiency disorders for which hematological stem cell transplantation is the standard of care. Human Leucocyte Antigen (HLA) matching is required to prevent rejection and other transplant related complications. With advances in cord blood transplantation, many patients are now able to find a fully or partially HLA-matched cord blood donor. With increasing advances in the use of UCB, there has been rise in the ethical issues concerned with it. Objective: A review of articles published on the topic of cord blood banking and cord blood stem cell transplantation was conducted. The objectives of this study are: Is cord blood banking a feasible method for Future use in India? What are the ethical issues involved in cord blood banking? Which method of banking is a better option out of the two– a)Private banking b) Public banking? Methodology/Review: The myths spread favouring private banking appear to be a propaganda – exploiting people purely for a profitable Business. Promotional advertisements by private cord blood banks are often misleading for the public. Though the likelihood of finding a match through public bank is much higher than through private banking; the use of UCB transplant is much less compared to the UCB stored in the country. Conclusion: Researchers continue to evaluate the usefulness of cord blood cells in treating human diseases or disorders for purposes other than haematological disorders including heart disease, strokes, brain or spinal cord injuries and cancer. This review paper summarizes the status of umbilical cord blood banking in India. It emphasises the need to increase the awareness of umbilical cord blood transplant in the country and use of more effective and economically sustainable method for storage and not to see it in a business perspective.

Keywords: Blood banking, ethics, umbilical cord


  Oral 029 Top



  Ethical Issues of Predictive Genetic Testing for Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Attitude of Sindhi Community Top


Sanjeev Chaudhary, Ujwala Ukey, Uday Narlawar

Government Medical College, Nagpur, Maharashtra, India

Background: With the rising number of individuals affected with diabetes and the significant health care costs of treatment, the emphasis on prevention is key to controlling the health burden of this disease. Several genetic and genomic studies have identified genetic variants associated with increased risk to diabetes. As a result, commercial testing is available to predict an individual’s genetic risk. Although the clinical benefits of testing have not yet been demonstrated, it is worth considering some of the ethical implications of testing for this common chronic disease. Objectives: The objective of this study was to see the attitude of people regarding predictive testing for type 2 diabetes mellitus. Methods: The study was carried out among 100 subjects belonging to Sindhi community. Ethical approval was sought from the ethical committee of Government medical college and hospital, Nagpur. Non diabetic persons more than 40 years of age were included in the study. Subjects were asked for their willingness for predictive genetic testing for type 2 diabetes mellitus, parental history of diabetes mellitus, and certain questions related to the test, like financial problems, communicating the risk to family and friends, behaviour change in case of positive or negative test, etc. Results: Majority of the subjects were not willing for predictive genetic testing, though they were ready to get sugar testing done to know whether they really had diabetes mellitus. Twenty percent subjects had positive family history of diabetes mellitus. Subjects said that a positive result of predictive testing would cause undue stress, and also affect the lifestyle of the subject as well as the entire family. As regards appropriate age for testing, subjects said that it would be better if it is done in childhood, so that care could be taken for prevention; though possibility of stigmatization or discrimination could not be ruled out. Conclusion: In general, the attitude of study subjects was negative with regard to the test, which was reflected from doubt regarding the necessity of the test, and risk of discrimination or stigmatization in case of a positive test. As new predictive genetic tests for common, complex diseases such as T2DM are developed and commercialized, it will be critical to the safe and appropriate use of these new applications to consider the potential ethical implications they raise and steps to prevent or ameliorate harms.

Keywords: Ethics, predictive genetic testing, type 2 diabetes mellitus


  Oral 030 Top



  Knowledge, Attitude and Practices about Ethics in Research among Undergraduate Medical Students: A Cross-Sectional Study Top


Pooja Krishnan

K. S. Hegde Medical Academy, Mangalore, Karnataka, India

Background: As in any other field, ethics is an inevitable part of research. In the current world where medical field and research go hand in hand, it is essential to cultivate the concept of ethics among undergraduate medical students. So, based on the conclusions of this research, the awareness regarding research ethics and Research Ethics Committee (REC) among medical students can be found out and thereby necessary changes can be made in curriculum. Objective: To assess the Knowledge, Attitude, and Practice about ethical component to be involved in research among undergraduate medical students. Methodology: Study design: Cross-sectional study. Study group: Undergraduate medical students of age 18 to 25 years. Sample size: 150 participants. Method: Validated questionnaire was distributed, and responses were collected. Ethical issues: Participation was voluntary. Ethical committee permission was obtained. Results: About 83.3% were aware that an application or review of the ethics of proposed health related research shall be submitted before REC, 16.7% were not aware of it. Most of them (96.67%) knew that the student’s application is submitted under the responsibility of a qualified advisor or faculty member. About 72% knew that changes should not be made to the approved protocol without prior REC approval and also 78.67% were aware that change can be made where immediate action is necessary to avoid harm to research participants. Majority (87.34%) knew that an authorized surrogate decision maker is required to give consent for children and mentally challenged adults. Many (81.34%) were of the opinion that the population bearing the risk of participating in the research should be benefited from the knowledge derived from the research. A percentage of 96.67 students were in the opinion that precaution should be taken to safeguard participant’s privacy and confidentiality. Conclusion: From the study, it is revealed that most of the students are aware about the given ethical guidelines in research. But along with that some of the students are ignorant about the same and a few of them have a negative opinion about that. Even though the current curriculum includes ethical education, the study points to the lack of lectures in research ethics. Hence the study puts forward the necessity of giving more importance to research ethics classes as research is an important component of medical education.

Keywords: Ethics, practice, research


  Oral 031 Top



  Capillary Refill Time as a Red Flag Indicator in Term Neonates Top


Aishwarya Jaodand, Amar Taksande

Jawaharlal Nehru Medical College, Datta Meghe Institute of Medical Sciences (Deemed to be University), Sawangi (Meghe), Wardha, Maharashtra, India

Background: Capillary refill time (CRT) is yet to be established as a specific clinical sign of peripheral circulation in neonates. Objective: To assess the normal values of capillary refilling time (CRT) in healthy new-born babies and to compare CRT at different body sites. Methodology: CRT was measured in a sample of 200 healthy new-borns between 1 to 5 days in the SNCU, Neonatology unit, AVBRH hospital. CRT was measured in four of the most suitable sites—namely, midpoints of the sternum and the forehead, the palm of the hand and the plantar surface of the heel (defined as chest, head, palm and heel, respectively). The applied pressing time was 5 seconds. Pressure was released and the time for complete refilling of the blanched area noted. CRT was measured with a manual stopwatch. Results: The examination was performed on 200 healthy, term infants born at 37–41 weeks of gestation. The CRT of the chest distribution curves followed the Gaussian curve. The mean values and standard deviation of CRT for the chest is 2.76±0.48, for the head is 2.98±0.88, for the palm is 2.56±1.08 and for the sole is 2.36±096. Other determinant like sex, birth weight and mode of delivery, were not found to significantly affect CRT values. Conclusion: CRT values of the midpoints of the sternum are the most consistent. CRT can be accepted as a useful measure of peripheral perfusion and circulatory status in the new-born infant.

Keywords: Capillary, indicator, neonates


  Oral 032 Top



  Incidence of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury in a Rural Tertiary Care Hospital Top


Niharika Kochhal, Vasant Gawande, Rahul Thakur

Jawaharlal Nehru Medical College, Datta Meghe Institute of Medical Sciences (Deemed to be University), Sawangi (Meghe), Wardha, Maharashtra, India

Background: Knee is the largest joint in the human body with a very complex anatomy. It is a mobile trocho-ginglymus (pivotal hinge joint). ACL originates from the medial and anterior aspect of the tibial plateau and runs superiorly, laterally, and posteriorly towards its insertion on the lateral femoral condyle. The anterior cruciate ligament is composed of the anteromedial and posterolateral bundles. Together, these bundles provide approximately 85% of total restraining force of anterior translation. Since the knee supports nearly the whole weight of the body, it is vulnerable to both acute injury and the development of osteoarthritis. ACL injury commonly causes knee instability than injury to other knee ligaments. Objectives: To evaluate the incidence of ACL injury in Indian rural population who come to the department of Orthopaedics in routine and emergency hours with the complaint of knee injury. Methodology: We conducted a study at the Orthopaedics department of A.V.B.R.H., Sawangi. We assessed all the patients who have been enrolled in AVBRH for knee injury and have been diagnosed with ACL tear by clinical methods and were supported with radiological (MRI) findings in the 1st part of the study and the study was continued prospectively for the assessment and analyses of the patients coming to the above mentioned department. Clinical Methods: Lachman test and Anterior drawer test. Radiological Method: MRI Type of study design- retrospective+prospective Selection criteria Inclusion criteria: patients b/w 16-60 yrs of age Exclusion criteria: Patient with active knee joint infection/additional bony injury. Patient not willing for any treatment and follow up. Patient who was not willing to give consent for participation in the study. Results: Out of 155 patients included in the study, 15 were female and 140 were male. in our study, we found that 40% of the patients were affected on the left side, 59% on right side and 1% on both the sided of the knees. Conclusion: In our study, we found the following Patients suffering from road traffic accidents have the highest rate of development of Anterior cruciate ligament injury. Twisting injuries/Trivial fall injuries/injuries from fall on ground give the 2nd highest numbers of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injuries. Men are more prone to have Anterior Cruciate ligament injury than women. Patients falling in the age group of 16-25 years of age, are more prone to have ACL injuries.

Keywords: Anterior cruciate ligament, injury, rural


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  An Effectiveness of the Teaching Module on Knowledge Regarding Basic Life Support Algorithm among Interns at Tertiary Health Care Centre, Nagpur, Maharashtra Top


Priya Dhurve

Department of Community Medicine, Indira Gandhi Government Medical College and Hospital, Nagpur, Maharashtra, India

Background: Cardiac arrests and accidents are the most common emergencies now a days. These emergencies can be managed by proper knowledge and practice of resuscitation skills. The incidence of cardiac arrests is alarming and may occur anytime anywhere. Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation allows almost anyone to sustain life in the early critical minutes after cardiac and respiratory arrest. BLS procedures include Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR), artificial ventilation, bleeding control and basic airway management. Objective: The objective is to assess the level of knowledge among interns on basic life support algorithm(CPR) before and after orientation in a tertiary care center. Methodology: A present cross sectional study was undertaken at Indira Gandhi Government Medical College, Nagpur. This study was part of internship orientation program and carried out on 8 February 2019. Total number of 95 interns who were present at the time of session on CPR were selected. Interns were asked open/ close ended questions about basic life support (CPR) in the form of pre orientation test and post orientation test. Self-administered, structured questionnaire was used comprising of 20 number of questions. Data was analysed using Epi info and Microsoft excel. Results: Total 95 interns had given pre orientation test and post orientation test. On comparison post orientation test mean score of interns was significantly high as compare to pre orientation test mean score (p value <0.05). There were 82 interns scored <70 % in pre orientation test while only 2 interns in post orientation test. No one scored ≥90% in pre orientation test while 54 interns scored ≥90% in post orientation test. Conclusion: This study shows that knowledge of interns before orientation was poor with regard to BLS but it was improved significantly after orientation. Hence, there is need to conduct such orientation in internship as it is helpful during internship to apply this knowledge effectively.

Keywords: Algorithm, basic life support, training


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  Awareness of Bioethics in Critical Care Settings of a Tertiary Care Centre Top


Aditya Khandekar, Sourya Acharya, Samarth Shukla, Neema Acharya

Acharya Vinoba Bhave Rural Hospital, Datta Meghe Institute of Medical Sciences (Deemed to be University), Sawangi (Meghe), Wardha, Maharashtra, India

Background: Bioethics is a subject rarely taught or discussed in residency. This can often result in a lack of awareness regarding patient rights and decision-making policies, especially amongst residents working in such high dependency units. To improve awareness regarding patient ethics, a study was thus conducted in AVBRH under the Dept. of Internal Medicine, to assess knowledge, aptitude and awareness of Residents working in Critical Care Units across the tertiary care centre. Objective: To assess knowledge, aptitude and awareness of Residents working in Critical Care Units across the tertiary care centre. Methodology: The study was a cross-sectional study conducted across a period of two months, from 1st April 2019 to 1st June 2019. Study participants included 50 residents working in critical care units across multiple Departments of the Tertiary Care centre, with inclusion criteria being 1st, 2nd and 3rd Year Junior residents who consented to participate in the study, and exclusion criteria being other senior faculty from the Critical care unit, and those that did not agree to be a part of the project. Questionnaires were distributed to residents containing 10 multiple choice questions based on often-used terms with regards to ethics, including DNR (Do Not resuscitate), ‘respect of autonomy’, and ‘best interest standards’ of a patient, and included clinical case scenarios on decision-making in emergency and ICU settings. On completion of filling of the questionnaire by all residents, data was entered into Microsoft Excel v. 2010, and responses were assessed based on percentages of residents that got each question right. Results: Results showed that while >50% residents scored correct answers on the clinical-based scenarios of critical care, aptitude regarding terminologies and decision-making ethics, including patient rights in such scenarios, needed considerable improvement, as no more than 30% residents could answer questions based on these accurately. Conclusion: Thus, there is a need to inculcate bioethics-based learning into residency in today’s times, especially amongst those who begin work in critical-care setups during this period. This can improve awareness of patient rights and directly result in better decision-making practices.

Keywords: Awareness, bioethics, tertiary care


  Oral 035 Top



  Assessment of the Patterns and Prevalence of Thyroid Dysfunctions in the Rural Community of Central India Top


Anna Marry Jose

Department of Radio Diagnosis, DMIMS

Introduction: Thyroid disorders refer to medical conditions resulting from impaired functioning of the thyroid gland and there are a number of conditions arising due to excess or reduce/fall in production of hormones, due to growth of the gland or nodule formation. Some of them are cancerous. The variation of symptoms from mild to severe which include fatigue, hair loss, brain fog, weight gain/loss, anxiety and depression, constipation, insomnia, diarrhea and more; which can have a significant impact on function and quality of life. Objectives: (1) To assess the prevalence of thyroid dysfunctions in the rural community. (2) To categorize the pattern of thyroid dysfunctions. (3) To evaluate for any other health condition/comorbidity. Methodology: A hospital-based Cross-Sectional Study conducted in AVBR hospital located in rural area of Wardha. Total of 40 patients attending the Medicine, Surgery, Pediatrics, OBGY & ENT outpatient department presenting with a Thyroid nodule/Goitre will be screened for thyroid function after obtaining informed consent. The participants administered a preformed prestructured Thyroid Assessment Questionnaire in the local languages; Thyroid function tests are the routinely advised tests for diagnostic purpose. Based on this the subjects will be categorized as euthyroid, hypothyroid and hyperthyroid. Raised levels of T3 & T4 are suggestive of Hyperthyroidism. Results: The hospital had registered 44 patients during the period of 3 months (Oct-Dec 2017). Records of these patients were derived from the Hospital Medical Records Department. The data entered in MS Excel sheet & analyzed using EPI-INFO software. The analysis findings will be presented.

Keywords: Community, disorders, thyroid


  Oral 036 Top



  Determination and Estimation of Medically Important Phytochemical Present in Garlic Species (Allium sativum) Top


Sirjan Singh, Asha Jha

Jawaharlal Nehru Medical College, Datta Meghe Institute of Medical Sciences (Deemed to be University), Sawangi (Meghe), Wardha, Maharashtra, India

Background: We are having many medicinal plants in our environment which can be used for therapeutic purposes or as precursors of useful drugs. Since ancient times, mankind has used plants to treat common diseases and some of these traditional medicines are still included as part of the habitual treatments of various maladies. Garlic (Allium sativum) is one such herbal spice in our kitchen, useful in cardiovascular diseases, regulating blood pressure, lowering blood sugar, maintaining cholesterol levels and fighting against many cancers and oxidative distress. The analyses of the pharmacological activity of plant extracts may therefore make possible the design of less expensive therapies to be used in economically unprivileged regions. Another driving factor for the renewed interest in plant antimicrobials in the past 20 years has been the rapid rate of plant species extraction. Therefore, there is an increased necessity of research on garlic. Objective: To detect and Find concentration of Allicin in the sample of garlic extract using standard and high-Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC). To detect the presence of Sulphur in the sample of garlic extract. Methodology: Collection of Garlic and preparation of garlic extract using cheesecloth. Preliminary tests including lead acetate test and sodium nitroprusside test for detection of sulphur and estimation of allicin using high performance liquid chromatography. Results: HPLC result showed retention time of standard garlic solution similar to the extract used hence confirming the presence of allicin. Conclusion: With the help of HPLC and two biochemical tests we conclude here that garlic has allicin and sulphur.

Keywords: Allium sativum, garlic, phytochemical


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  The Importance of Basic Diagnostic Modalities for Evaluating Acute Abdominal Cases Top


D. Suhas, Md. Jawed Akther

Department of General Surgery, Jawaharlal Nehru Medical College, Sawangi, Wardha, Maharashtra, India

Background: Presentation of acute pain in abdomen is a commonly dealt phenomenon. This requires urgent attention and swift management which otherwise will have disastrous outcomes. Acute abdominal presentations deal with both traumatic and non-traumatic emergencies. Acute abdominal emergencies carry with them the weight of high morbidity and mortality if not dealt with swiftly. Thus, this study was done with the view of correlating the various modalities of diagnoses which help in the immediate management of such acute abdominal emergencies which may prove to be lifesaving to the patient. Objective: To study and compare the efficiency of different clinical and radiological methods in early diagnosis of acute abdominal presentations. Methodology: The study was conducted in AVBRH, Sawangi (Meghe), Wardha and included the patients who presented to the casualty and were admitted. Total 100 cases of acute abdomen were included in this study. Initially the patients were examined in the bedside using various clinical modalities and were later advised to undergo and X-ray of the chest & abdomen followed by sonography of the abdomen & pelvis. Results: It was found that acute abdominal presentations were most commonly seen in the age group varying between 20 and 40 years with preponderance towards males. The most common acute surgical presentation was found to be Acute appendicitis which was followed by Peritonitis and Intestinal Obstruction. The rates of accuracy of diagnostic modalities in male and female patients were 94% and 78% respectively. The diagnostic modality with highest sensitivity rates were found to be observed with Ultrasonography (98%) and the highest specificity rates were found to be observed with plain x ray abdomen (88%). Conclusion: It was observed that both these diagnostic modalities in diagnosing acute abdominal presentations, complemented each other. But the accuracy rates were found to be extremely high 95% to 98% when doing a good bedside clinical examination while using X-ray and sonography of the abdomen as preliminary diagnostic modalities, thus circumventing the need of unnecessary surgical interventions.

Keywords: Abdominal pain, emergency care, surgical interventions


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  Are You Willing to Let It Go! Top


Akanksha Mandal, Pramita Muntode

Jawaharlal Nehru Medical College, Swangi (Meghe), Wardha, Maharashtra, India

Background: As I travelled I noticed some boxes kept by the side of the road, those are donation boxes. So here’s what happens. People who want to donate their stuff can just drop their items in the boxes and every once a month, items from the boxes are collected and taken to places where people actually need those stuff. Clothes, books, household items or anything that just lie in our house, if we were to donate them and it could be of some use to someone then would’nt it be a good thing. I m certain to say it will be a good feeling! Description of Concept/Idea: As a college student, I live in hostel and I have experienced that in the limit of a small room I have many things which are useless to me but might be useful to someone else and like me there are thousand’s of student in my college so if this happens in all the college campus, millions of us will be helping millions of billions of people all around India and the world. That ought to be a great feeling. In today’s world, there are so many natural calamities happening around. As we have noticed some traumatizing disasters like flood in Kerala, cyclone in Gujarat, earthquake in Odissa and so many more. With these disasters happening, many people lose their homes and it’s next to impossible for them to survive. On the other hand, we all live a comfortable life where we have so much stuff in our homes lying around with no use. We can give such things to those who need it the most right now. All we need are 3-4 donation Boxes kept at certain known landmarks of our college and people can just drop in their items that don’t need any more but are in a good condition and then once a week, a transport will carry all the items and give it to places where people can make use of our donated items. Conclusion: This year’s ETHOS theme - “Bioethics for bridging the health equity gap in an unequal and culturally diverse world.” Is striking a chord with my idea. We all take different roads but to reach the same destination. I feel it will bring us all close and make us all equal in our world, without variations, with all of us following sole religion of humanity.

Keywords: Boxes, calamity, people, needs


  Oral 039 Top



  Risk Factors for Hospitalization among Patients with Normal Ejection Fraction Heart Failure Top


Shilpa Bawankule, Deep Hathi

Department of Medicine, JNMC, Sawngi (Meghe), Wardha, Maharashtra, India

Background: Normal Ejection Fraction Heart Failure (NEFHF), defined as “signs and symptoms of congestive heart failure (CHF) with normal/near normal systolic function.” The clinical profile and natural history of the syndrome remain controversial. Furthermore, the risk factors associated with hospitalization among NEFHF are rarely observed. Methodology: This observational study was carried out among patients admitted to Medicine critical care unit of Acharya Vinoba Bhave hospital from September 2018 to April 2019. Patients fulfilling Framingham criteria of heart failure underwent 2Decho. Patients with ejection fraction of more than 50%, without any valvular disease and having positive BNP were included in the study. Results: The Mean age of 46 Patients was in 55.78± 14.06 years, and 29(61.70%) were females. The mean ejection fraction was 57.65± 4.93. The comorbities associated were hypertension (63.83%), diabetes (4.26%), obesity (41.3%), Ischemic heart disease (6.38%), atrial fibrillation (21.7%). New-onset atrial fibrillation, ischemia, and medical comorbidities and diabetes were RISK FACTORS associated with hospitalization. ACE/ARB (76.09%) and beta-blocker (67.3%) therapy were independently associated with improved survival. Discussion: Our present study included 46 patients of normal ejection fraction heart failure over period of Six months. The most common presenting symptoms were dyspnea 46 (100%) and pedal edema 25 (54.34%). The most common risk factor identified is hypertension 30 (63.83%) which is consistent with other trials of HFpEF. Klapholz et al. and Dubourg et al. also showed similar results. Associated other risk factors were diabetes, Dyslipidemia, obesity, Coronary artery disease. Majority of the patients were female 29 (61.70%) which is consistent with other studies. The average length of hospital stay in our study showed that females had longer length of stay (9.24± 9.18) than males (6.29 ± 3.47). Atrial fibrillation was seen in 10 (21.7%) of patients. Obesity 19 (41.3%), smoking 6 (12.77%) diabetes 2 (4.26%) were the associated risk factors. HFpEF is a disease which has a high prevalence in elderly which is consistent with our study. All patients have LVEF >50%, LVH (57.65 ± 4.93) is the most common echo findings due to high prevalence of hypertension and concentric LV hypertrophy. Majority of the patients were treated according to the etiology with anti hypertensives (ACE inhibitors, beta blockers), diuretics, Ionotropic agents (Digoxin), nitrates, CCBs, statins, and anti platelet agents. Conclusion: This population-based study provides a comprehensive clinical profile, current management, prognosis, and predictors of outcome of patients with new onset CHF who had normal ejection fraction.

Keywords: Clinical care, heart failure, risk factors


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  To Correlate Luminal Status with Stage of the Disease in a Case of Carcinoma Breast Top


Raghav Jindal

Department of Surgery, JNMC, Sawangi (Meghe), Wardha, Maharashtra, India

The data taken include data based on nine factors, which were found to be predictive: age, tumor size, tumor type, tumor location, lymphovascular invasion, mulifocality, histologic grade, estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor status. This study evaluated the risk factors for LN metastasis and relationship of luminal status with stage of the disease. Aim: To correlate luminal status with stage of the disease in a case of carcinoma breast. Objective: (A) To study the luminal status with the stage of disease 1.luminal A is ER PR positive Her2neu negative. 2 Only Her2neu positive -ER PR negative 3.luminal b is ER PR negative /positive (either ER or PR is positive) and Her2neu positive 4.triple negative (B) correlation with age and luminal status of the disease (C) correlation with grade and luminal status of the disease (D) correlation with size if tumour and luminal status of disease. Type Of Study: observational study. Sample size:-200 case Results: In our present study relationship of luminal status with stage of the disease was correlated. By statistical analysis it was observed that there is a strong relationship between stage of disease and luminal status and it was found that patients with higher stage of disease had poor luminal status i.e triple negative statis. Conclusion: It was concluded by the study result that patients with higher stage of the disease had poor luminal status and patients with early stage of the disease had mostly favourable luminal status of the disease.

Keywords: Breast cancer, luminal status, lymph node


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  Clinical Profile of Children with Cerebral Palsy Top


Pooj Kumari, Jayant Vagha

JNMC, DMIMS (DU), Sawangi (Meghe), Wardha, Maharashtra, India

Introduction: The pediatric population has many children with developmental delay .One of the common cause of developmental delay is cerebral palsy (CP). The demography, causes, clinical features and management aspects are studied in this project. Aims and Objectives: To assess the spectrum of functional disability and to evaluate the comorbid conditions associated with cerebral palsy. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted over a period of 1 year in department of pediatrics JNMC sawangi .The study population included was children diagnosed with cerebral palsy under the age of 16 years who were admitted in pediatric department. The exclusion criteria were non consenting patients and cases with cases with non central causes of motor deficit. There history, examination and investigations were done according to the advices of the treating physician. During hospitalisation, the cases were studied for presentation, causes, course, co morbidities and outcome. All the information was recorded in prevalidated proforma. The results were interpreted by use of appropriate statistical methods. Results: In the study 48 cases were included for analysis out of which 27 were male and 21 were female with sex ratio of 1.3:1.The age distribution was <1year -19 (40%), 1-2year-16 (33%), 2-3years-8 (16%), >3years-5 (10%).The topographical types of cerebral palsy were spastic diplegic CP 31 (65%),quadriplegic CP 15 (15%), dystonic CP 3 (6%),hemiplegic CP 2 (4%), mixed CP 4 (8%). The birth asphyxia 18 (38%) was the most common cause of CP followed by neonatal illnesses and prematurity in this study. These children were admitted with developmental delay/ not gain in weight and concurrent illnesses like pneumonia 10 (12.5%) and gastroenteritis 8 (17%). There were no deaths. The cases were discharged after giving appropriate counselling, advices and management. Conclusion: The motor deficits in the form of difficulty in walking and use of hands for appropriate tasks were the most common disability as study had cases mostly with diplegic and quadriplegic CP. The most common co morbidities were pneumonia and gastroenteritis.

Keywords: Cerebral palsy, developmental delay


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  Awareness of Patients’ Rights among Indoor patients of a Tertiary Care Teaching Hospital in Wardha Top


Shobha Joshi, Rutuj Waghmare

Department of Community Medicine, JNMC, Sawangi (M), Wardha, Maharashtra, India

Background: Patient’s knowledge about their disease condition and rights creates a benchmark for effective doctor-patient communication. Informed patients are better aware of their diseases, treatment, and care thus, they should also be made to actively participate in their own care. For these reason health care workers should educate the patient regarding their disease condition. Getting educated for disease condition is right of patient and it is necessary for the patient’s knowledge as it reflects their health care seeking behaviors. Objectives: To assess the Awareness of Patients’ Rights among Indoor patients of a Tertiary Care Teaching Hospital. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted on 196 indoor patients of Tertiary Care Teaching Hospital of Wardha city using questionnaire based interview. The sampling was done by simple random sampling method. Written Inform consent was taken from patients who were admitted as indoor patients and had remained beyond 3 weeks in the hospital. The questionnaire used in the present study consisted of 21 questions on patients’ rights. The study participants were subjected to the 21 point questionnaire with instructions to respond to each question with a ‘yes’ or a ‘no’. The participant’s demographic details were noted. The questionnaire was developed based on standards of the National Accreditation Board for Hospitals and Healthcare Providers (NABH) and patients’ charter of rights and validated. Descriptive analysis was carried out in order to evaluate the measures of the collected result. Conclusion: Our study findings conclude that effective measures should be taken to improve the overall awareness not only among patients but also among different stakeholders in the healthcare delivery system. It is important to display the patient’s charter of rights to increase knowledge & create awareness in the beneficiaries. Patient Right Committee in the hospital should be established for supervision, monitoring and observance of patients’ rights.

Keywords: Knowledge, patients, rights


  Oral 043 Top



  Correlation between Dilation and Curettage, Ultrasonography and Hysteroscopy Findings in Diagnosing a Cause for Abnormal Uterine Bleeding Top


Puja Kumari

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology (JR 2)

Introduction: Abnormal uterine bleeding (AUB) is the most often encountered gynecological problem. A newly coined term describes the condition wherein there is any deviation from a normal menstrual pattern. An estimated 5% women aged 30-49 years consult a gynecologist each year for treatment. This makes it imperative to accurately diagnose and treat the cause. This study aims at judging the place of diagnostic hysteroscopy in obtaining an accurate diagnosis of the etiology of AUB and amp; outlining a mode of treatment. This is done by correlating the findings on hysteroscopy and those found on a dilation and curettage (D&C) and ultrasonography (USG). Materials and Methods: This prospective study was performed in the Dept. of Obstetrics and Gynecology, AVBRH, sawangi, wardha. Fifty cases of AUB were chosen based on inclusion and exclusion criteria. The patients Dwere subjected to routine investigations, USG, D&C and hysteroscopy. The findings of the three were compared and analyzed. Results: AUB was most common between 30-39 years (44%). Maximum patients had complaints since 3-6 months (50%). Menorrhagia was the most common presenting complaint (46%). Normal findings were observed in 40% cases with D&C, 16% with USG, 22% with hysteroscopy. Abnormal findings were seen in 60% cases with D&C, 84% with USG, 78% with hysteroscopy. The over-diagnostic role of USG is also highlighted. Conclusion: This study reveals the superior ability of hysteroscopy in evaluating patients with AUB, when compared to D&C and USG. These findings are in agreement with those of many other studies.

Keywords: Hysteroscopy, USG, uterine bleeding


  Oral 044 Top



  Knowledge of Medical Ethics among Medical Students Top


U. U. Ukey, S. K. Sharma, S. M. Choudhary, P. Rathod, U. Narlawar

Department of Community Medicine, Government Medical College, Nagpur, Maharashtra, India

Background: Medical ethics are integral to all clinical encounters and public health interventions, and a foundation in medical ethics is essential for students to become virtuous doctors. Ethics teaching has been shown to have a profound influence on medical professionals’ attitudes towards patients. Knowledge of biomedical ethics is acquired mostly during the undergraduate training. It is important to identify deficiencies of students and/or professionals on ethical issues and arrange sensitization and at times, appropriate training to tackle them. Objective: To study the knowledge of medical students about medical ethics. Methodology: A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted among the medical students at a teaching institute in Central India. Students of final year part 1 were the study participants for the present study. A self-administered structured questionnaire with questions about various aspects of ethics and source of the knowledge was used to collect data. Analysis was done with epi info software. Results and Conclusion: Most of the students (65%) had a fair knowledge about the ethics in medicine. The main source of knowledge was lecture followed by seminars presented by students. Students were in favour of ethical practice in the professional life.

Keywords: Awareness, ethics, students


  Oral 045 Top



  Remotely Monitored Food Quality and Safety of Mid Day Meal Top


Shilpa Raut

Indian Institute of Technology, Indore, Madhya Pradesh, India

Background: Mid Day Meal (MDM) is a nationwide school meal program of the Government of India, aimed at improving the nutritional status of school age children. MDM is expected to provide healthy, hygienic food with important nutrients and vitamins. To maintain nutritional standard and food quality, there is state steering –cum monitoring committee with delegation to District committee and school management committee. Testing of food is done by state food and drug administrative department in accredited laboratories for nutritive value and food quality once a month from randomly selected schools/ kitchens. This is a time and expertise demanding work and is required to be performed in routine. Hence, a remotely monitored POC module to measure food quality and safety parameters is planned for safe, hygienic and nutritive food in Mid Day Meal. Objective: Development of Point of Care (POC) module for evaluation of food safety and quality, Remote monitoring of food quality at district, Validation and Evaluation of POC module through survey and direct food quality check with conventional methods, A Point of Care (POC) module development- POC is a technology which is applicable onsite and is ready immediately for diagnosis and treatment of individual food scenario. Sensors for selected parameters for data collection will be deployed in this module. A mobile phone instrument will be used for digital analysis, data collection and analysis. Module for Data Analysis: The data collected through POC module via mobile phone will be analyzed here. This will necessitate incorporation of various information. The site of data collection, time, type of food, normal range value for each parameter will be required to be entered. This data will have a control by matching it with digital vision. The normal limits of parameters will be entered as per accepted international and national standards for comparision and analysis.

Keywords: Food quality, mid-day meal, safety


  Oral 046 Top



  Evaluation of Liver Functions in Patients of Alcohol Induced Liver Disorders Top


Ruchir Khare, A. W. Meshram

NSCB Medical College, Jabalpur, Madhya Pradesh, India

Background: The hazardous and harmful use of alcohol is a major global contributing factor to death, disease and injury to the drinker through health impacts, such as alcohol dependence, liver cirrhosis, cancers and injuries; and to others through the dangerous actions of intoxicated people, such as drink–driving and violence or through the impact of drinking on fetus and child development. The harmful use of alcohol results in approximately 2.5 million deaths each year, with a net loss of life of 2.25 million, taking into account the estimated beneficial impact of low levels of alcohol use on some diseases in some population groups. Harmful drinking can also be very costly to communities and societies. Alcohol is a causal factor in 60 types of diseases and injuries and a component cause in 200 others. Laboratory liver tests are broadly defined as tests useful in the evaluation and treatment of patients with hepatic dysfunction. Objective: To evaluate liver function tests in alcoholic patients and to compare them with non-alcoholic healthy subjects. Methodology: This study was conducted in the Department of Biochemistry, Acharya Vinoba Bhave Rural Hospital and Jawaharlal Nehru Medical College, Sawangi (Meghe) Wardha. 50 diagnosed chronic alcoholics subjects with a history of chronic alcohol intake for more than two years, were taken from the Department of Psychiatry and Department of Medicine, Acharya Vinoba Bhave Rural Hospital,(A.V.B.R.H.) Sawangi (Meghe) Wardha, with alcohol use disorders (AUDs), according to ICD-10 criteria. Results: AST,ALT, AST:ALT ratio, Total protein, albumin, ALP, total bilirubin, direct & indirect bilirubin were found significantly raised in patients with alcoholic liver injury. Conclusion: Liver function tests predicts alcohol induced liver injury and are very useful to diagnose or for prognosis of alcoholic liver diseases as single test may be normal in alcoholics or abnormal in asymptomatic individuals.

Keywords: Alcoholism, health care, liver disorders


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  Association of Adhesive Factor with Oxidative Stress in Patients of Sickle Cell Anemia Top


Priyanka Bhatkulkar

Department of Biochemistry, NSCB Medical College, Jabalpur, Madhya Pradesh, India

Background: Sickle cell disease is one of the autosomal recessive genetic red cell disorder with a huge worldwide distribution is sickle cell disease which is the result of point mutation in beta-globin gene codon 6 causing huge psychosocial burden. Many prognostic and diagnostic markers have been identified so far for sickle cell disease. This study is conducted to evaluate the role of circulating adhesive factor E-selectin and its association with the one of the oxidative stress marker. Objective: To find out the relationship between circulating adhesive molecule and oxidative stress in patients of SCD. Methodology: This observational study was conducted in department of Biochemistry of J N Medical College, Sawangi, Wardha on 50 patients of SCD. We analyzed circulating adhesive factor E-selectin and oxidative stress markers in 50 patients of SCD with HbSS pattern and compared the values with 50 control subjects. Results: Mean E-selectin levels were significantly higher in HbSS subjects (77.95± 8.86) as compared to HbAA (31.97± 10.66).Oxidative stress markers like mean MDA levels were significantly higher in HbSS subjects (4.34 ± 0.93) as compared to HbAA (1.68 ± 0.73) whereas mean catalase levels were significantly lower in HbSS subjects (23.14±7.047) as compared to HbAA (48.52±9.88) also mean superoxide dismutase levels (SOD) levels were significantly lower in HbSS subjects (1.44 ± 0.30) as compared to HbAA (3.66±0.61). Conclusion: The study suggests the role of sickle RBCs (SS-RBCs) in initiating and propagating the VOC (vasoocclusive crisis) events via adhesive interactions with the endothelium. It also indicates abnormal susceptibility of HbS- RBC membranes to lipid peroxidation. Oxidative damage is due to imbalance between the production of reactive oxygen species and the countering effect of the various antioxidants present in the body it shows that the antioxidant defense systems in SCA which might be affected and/or is not strong enough to neutralise the excessive production of ROS, chronic oxidative stress is a critical factor in endothelial dysfunction, inflammation and damage to multiple organs.

Keywords: Adhesive factor, oxidative stress, sickle cell anemia


  Oral 048 Top



  Science behind Indian Traditions Top


Naveen Gupta

Pt. Deendayal Upadhyay Memorial Health Sciences and Ayush University of Chhattisgarh, Raipur, Chhattisgarh, India

In fact the religions & their traditions, rituals or customs are the easy way to live happy, healthy & Ethical life. Every religion has some or the other traditions may be similar or a bit different than others. Surprisingly when these traditions were looked & analysed deeply, it is obvious that almost each Tradition is based on some or the other base of science. It is very interesting to find a scientific connection & correlations between the Spirituality & the Science. My paper will explore the scientific basis of many of the Hindu, Muslim & Christian Traditions for the better compliance & understanding the religions.

Keywords: Customs, ethics, religion, traditions


  Oral 049 Top



  Bioethics in Laboratory Medicine Top


Ashish Anjankar

Department of Biochemistry, Jawaharlal Nehru Medical College, Wardha, Maharashtra, India

Background: The professional personnel of a medical laboratory are bound by the ethical codes of their respective profession. The general principle of healthcare ethics is that the patient’s welfare is paramount. The laboratory should treat all patients fairly and without discrimination. Description: Ethics in laboratory medicine starts from collection of information for proper identification of patient and specimen. The patient should be aware of the purpose for which the information is collected. Ethical principles continue during specimen collection, performance of tests and reporting of the results. For most laboratory procedures, consent can be inferred when the patient presents him or herself at a laboratory with a request form and willingly submits to the usual collecting procedures, for example, venipuncture. Special procedures, including the more invasive procedures (bone marrow aspirations) will require a more detailed explanation and, in some cases, written consent. HIV testing and certain genetic testing will require counseling. The laboratory shall use tests procedures, including those for collection of specimens, which meet the appropriate standards. The results of laboratory examinations are confidential unless disclosure is authorized. The results will normally be reported to the requesting physician and may be reported to other parties with the patient’s consent or as required by law. In addition to the accurate reporting of laboratory results, the laboratory has an additional responsibility to ensure that the results are correctly interpreted and applied in the patient’s best interest. Ethical guidelines should also be followed during storage and retention of medical records. Test results must never be altered or corrected, except by properly authorized persons in accordance with established procedures. Facilities shall provide a suitable environment to prevent damage, deterioration, loss or unauthorized access. Access to the medical records should be available to Clinician, patient, hospital staff, and other authorized individuals. When a request to access the result is made by authorized person, laboratory must confirm the identity of the person. Different methods may exist in the same laboratory for different tests. (Example: HIV test & Hb test) Conclusion: Patients, Colleagues and the profession, Society are the three main groups towards which medical laboratories owe their responsibility. Resident doctors of Preclinical and Paraclinical subjects should be fully aware of Ethical Principles in Laboratory Medicine and they must follow them in their Clinical Practice.

Keywords: Ethics, laboratory


  Oral 050 Top



  Knowledge and Perceptions towards Doctor Patient Relationship among Physician Residents of DMIMSU, India Top


Shilpa Bawankule (Gaidhane)

Department of Medicine, Diabetes Clinic, AVBR Hospital, DMIMS (DU), Sawangi (M) Wardha, Maharashtra, India

Background: In this era of against violence against doctors, role of Medical ethics has become more prominent. Even though Medical ethics included in the training curriculum of doctors and there has been a growth in the number of ethics specialists and ethics committees. Yet complaints from the patients appear to be proliferating. This is reflection of an increased public awareness among patients as well as, lack of doctor-patient relationship. It has become a major factor for false accusation and allegation, deceitfulness against. Hence this study was conducted to observe the perception of medical residents for various aspects of doctor-patient relationship. Objectives: Method: This cross-sectional study was conducted to assess the knowledge and perceptions towards ethics in doctor-patient relationship among physician residents at DMIMSU university Sawangi meghe, Wardha, India. A self-administered structured questionnaire was used for knowledge and perceptions towards ethics in doctor-patient relationship. Results: Only 10.0% of the 42 participating residents had obtained their knowledge from their medical education. 50% of the residents had satisfactory knowledge and 30.2% had satisfactory perceptions regarding ethical issues. The lowest perception score was in the domain of disclosing medical errors. Only 48.0% of the residents were compliant with the principles of medical ethics in practice and 52.0% of patients were dissatisfied with their treating physicians. Conclusion: The study identified areas of unsatisfactory knowledge and practices towards ethical issues associated with doctor patient relationship so as to devise means to sensitize residents to these issues and train them appropriately.

Keywords: Doctor-patient relationship, medical ethics, violence


  Oral 051 Top



  Effect of Sudarshan Kriya Yoga on Oxidative Stress and Antioxidant Status in Leprosy Patients before and after Intervention Top


Anjali Vagga, N. R. Akarte

Department of Biochemistry, JNMC, Datta Meghe Institute of Medical Sciences, Sawangi (Meghe), Wardha, Maharashtra, India

Introduction: Leprosy was eliminated from India in 2005. WHO reported that India accounts for 60% of the world’s newly detected leprosy cases in 2016. In the post leprosy –elimination era, leprosy recognition and management is a challenging task. Sudarshan Kriya Yoga (SKY) is unique breathing process which includes Asanas, Pranayama, Bhastrika and Sudarshan Kriya (SK). SKY may be helps in decreasing decreases lipid per oxidation and improves antioxidant status in the blood. Aim: The aim of this was to evaluate the effects of SKY intervention on lipid peroxidation, antioxidant vitamins and Zinc levels in leprosy patients. Materials and Methods: Serum of leprosy patients was evaluated for Lipid per oxidation markers i.e. Malondialdehyde (MDA), antioxidant Vitamins(C and E) and Zinc were measured spectrophotometrically (Elico). A total of 152 patients of leprosy were randomised into two groups: 1. Leprosy patients (post treatment), 2. Leprosy patients (post treatment) performing SKY and monitored for regular practice. Interventional group underwent for SKY for a period of 3 months. The Malondialdehyde, antioxidant vitamins (C and E) and zinc levels were assessed at baseline and after 3 months in both the groups. Results: Results showed that serum MDA, the marker of oxidative stress was significantly reduced, and on the other hand antioxidant vitamins (C and E) and zinc levels showed significant rise in the post interventional group as compared with the control without SKY. Conclusion: This indicates a possible beneficial role of SKY in enhancing the body’s defense mechanisms by decreasing the oxidative damage in leprosy patients.

Keywords: Antioxidant vitamins, malondialdehyde, Sudarshan Kriya Yoga, zinc and leprosy patients


  Oral 052 Top



  Gender Issues in Early Childhood Development in Central India Top


Priti Kogade, Abhay Gaidhane, Shital Telrandhe, Umesh Kawalkar

NTCP, Akola, Maharashtra, India

Introduction: Early childhood is the most important phase of development of a person’s life. This is when cognitive, social and emotional skills are learned, influencing lifelong educational achievement, health and wellbeing. When young girls and boys are denied access to the opportunities, care and services they need to thrive and develop to their full potential, this affects the rest of their lives. In many communities, gender inequality is one important root cause of children’s poor development in the early years. Nutritional deprivation, poor mental and physical health post-delivery, and low education levels of mothers affect their children. Men’s unequal role as caregivers, absence, neglect, abandonment of families, and their exclusive control and authority in families deprive women of agency. Study was planned for studying the effect of gender issues on the development of child. Methodology: Qualitative research design was employed. A total 118 mother having children upto 2 years were included in the study. Total 10 Focused group discussions were conducted to capture the diverse social and cultural information influencing early childhood development. All recording and written notes was converted into English transcript then coded the transcripts using descriptive words or phrases. Data was presented in the thematic form. Results: It was observed that women were expected to bear and rear children upto the boy child may born irrespective of her health status and the risks associated with child birth. Economic Situation sometimes forces women into situations where their health of girl child would be compromised. Girls were not have same opportunities for growth as boys. Male Children are valued more than female children. Conclusion: There is more explicit attention may often need to be paid to gender discrimination and gender socialisation within ECD programmes. Early childhood development programming that ensures that children receive a comprehensive set of care, supports and services is key for children’s early years’ development; for preventing children from excluded groups from falling behind their more privileged peers before they even reach school; and for children’s academic performance, health, wellbeing and productivity into adult life

Keywords: Development, gender, pediatrics


  Oral 053 Top



  Voluntary or Regulated? Tuberculosis Notification by Private Practionnare: Case Study in Akola District Top


Umesh Kawalkar, Priti Kogade, Abhay Gaidhane

Department of Community Medicine, Government Medical College, Akola, Maharashtra, India

The private sector in India is highly unorganized, with a lack of regulation in notification; prescribing practices as well as the qualifications of those prescribing these medications. Apart from causing prolonged morbidity and increased mortality from the disease, poor prescribing practices also fuel the emergence and spread of drug–resistant organisms, and are most certainly one of the reasons why India accounts for over a fifth of the global MDR– TB burden, with indicators showing a rising trend. Notification is a statutory requirement common to diseases of public health importance; TB notification is a recognised standard of international TB care. In May 2012, the Government of India declared tuberculosis a notifiable disease, requiring all public and private health sectors throughout the country to report all cases. Until then, TB disease was notifiable only by public authorities. The government of India recently passed a notification making the non-reporting of tuberculosis (TB) cases by clinical establishments, including private practitioners and pharmacists, a punishable offence. Non-reporting may now be deemed either a “Negligent act likely to spread infection of disease dangerous to life” or a “Malignant act likely to spread infection of disease dangerous to life” under sections 269 and 270 of the Indian Penal Code, 1860. This will be punishable with either a fine or a period of imprisonment of up to 6 months or 2 years, depending upon the section invoked. In this study we observed the data from Akola District from the Department of Public Health (District TB Office Akola) before mandatory notification of Tuberculosis and compared with recent data. We also try to analyses the ethical issue in mandatory notification. Private sector dominates anti-tuberculosis treatment, and poorly managed cases lead to severe forms of TB. There is a marginal increase in the notification of tuberculosis by private practionnare in Akola district. Regulated approach would help to improve the notification. It is difficult to take legal action. One of the main ethical concerns relates to the violation of patient confidentiality, possible adverse consequences by a limiting of access to care due to penalising of non-reporting and also increased tension between the private sector and Government. There is need of simple, user-friendly platform for notification linked to a strategy to encourage the private health sector to prompt action. TB notification drive in the country and the necessary momentum could be garnered by massive campaigns and advocacy programmes is dire need.

Keywords: Case, public health, tuberculosis


  Oral 054 Top



  Impact of Service Learning on Dental Students Top


Safa Khan, Shravani Deolia

Department of Public Health Dentistry, Sharad Pawar Dental College, Wardha, Maharashtra, India

Background: There has been an increasing emphasis on importance of community service learning impact on dental students. To date, empirical studies on the impact of services are quiet scarce although recent studies provide some evidence that service is associated with the civic and cognitive gains. Aim and Objective: To evaluate effect of service learning approach on students’ understanding of their role in larger social world on following domains: Social responsibility, Awareness of social problems, Meaningfulness of college life, Expectation for future commitments to service. Materials and Methods: Ethical approval was obtained from institutional ethical committee. The study was conducted amongst the interns of from Sharad Pawar Dental College, Government Dental College, and VSPM Dental College. There were two groups of interns interventional group and control group. Interventional group underwent community service learning for 24 hours whereas control group was not exposed to any community service. The purpose of study was explained and data was collected by distributing the questionnaire to the interns of various colleges. A convenient sample of 153 interns were collected. The study objective were explained to the participants before commencing with the questionnaire. The questionnaire consisting of 41 closed ended questions were given to interns included in the study .The questionnaire collected the information about the demographic details of the interns. The questions that were asked to the interns according to stigma scale were, Does the community group need your help?.. Does the volunteers work at community agencies help solve… etc. The interns were asked to respond on seven point Likert scale i.e. strongly disagree, disagree, slightly disagree, neither disagree or agree, slightly agree, agree and strongly agree. Results: Ethical approval was obtained from institutional ethical committee. The study was conducted amongst the interns of from Sharad Pawar Dental College, Government Dental College, and VSPM Dental College. There were two groups of interns interventional group and control group. Interventional group underwent community service learning for 24 hours whereas control group was not exposed to any community service. The purpose of study was explained and data was collected by distributing the questionnaire to the interns of various colleges. A convenient sample of 153 interns were collected. The study objective were explained to the participants before commencing with the questionnaire. The questionnaire consisting of 41 closed ended questions were given to interns included in the study. The questionnaire collected the information about the demographic details of the interns. The questions that were asked to the interns according to stigma scale were, Does the community group need your help?.. Does the volunteers work at community agencies help solve… etc. The interns were asked to respond on seven point Likert scale i.e. strongly disagree, disagree, slightly disagree, neither disagree or agree, slightly agree, agree and strongly agree. Conclusion: This study involved a service-learning experience that was integrated with an academic course. It was observed that service-learning, even of short duration, can have a positive impact in the lives of students.

Keywords: Dentistry, ethics, health


  Oral 055 Top



  Comparison of Subjective and Objective Symptoms of Halitosis in Patients with Liver and Kidney Diseases Top


Anoosha Ganta, Yumna Muhsin, Batul Khumushi

Department of Pedodontics, Sharad Pawar Dental College, Wardha, Maharashtra, India

Background: There is an old adage “The mouth is the mirror to the body.” It means that the general health problems show oral manifestations. Halitosis in general means bad breath from the oral cavity. Halitosis has its origin in systemic diseases such as hepatic, pancreatic and renal insufficiencies, upper and lower respiratory tract infections and the consumption of some drugs. It is characterized by compounds such as Volatile Sulphur Compounds which include hydrogen sulphide, methyl mercaptan, dimethyl sulphide and dimethyl disulphide, volatile fatty acids with short aliphatic chains. Attempts have been made to find association between systemic diseases such pancreatic diseases and halitosis. On extensive research there was paucity of data on relation between halitosis and liver and kidney diseases. Therefore this study was conducted. Aim and Objective: This study compared the objective and subjective symptoms of halitosis in patients with liver and kidney diseases. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted on liver and kidney patients by the Private Dental College of Central India in collaboration with tertiary hospital, Sawangi (Meghe), Wardha. Forty four patients were included in the study suffering from liver and kidney diseases. The subjective symptoms were measured with the help of questionnaire. A 5 domain questionnaire was given to the patients along with consent. The objective symptoms were measured with the help of Halimeter. The oral hygiene status of patients was assessed by the presence of plaque using the criteria of Silness J. and Loe H.1964 by using mouth mirror, explorer and disclosing agent to rule out the underline cause of halitosis being the systemic diseases or the poor oral hygiene status of the patient. Data was analysed using SPSS version 2. Results: Out of 44 patients 25 were of kidney diseases and 19 were of liver diseases. The breath odour levels of 44 patients were 0-1 which is interpreted as NORMAL. The volatile sulphur compound level of normal interpretation was 80-160ppbs. Conclusion: There was no statistically significant difference between the subjective and objective symptoms of halitosis in liver and kidney diseases patients.

Keywords: Halitosis, kidney, liver


  Oral 056 Top



  To Evaluate Microleakage in Tooth Restored with 5th and 7th Generation Bonding Agents, an In vitro Study Top


Madhu Verma

Sharad Pawar Dental College, Wardha, Maharashtra, India

Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine the microleakage in the 5th and 7th generation bonding agents, Methodology: A total of 30 recently extracted human premolars were subjected to the study. Class V cavity preparations were prepared on the buccal and lingual surfaces of the extracted premolars with occlusal margins in the enamel and gingival margins in the cementum/dentin. The teeth were divided into 2 groups of 15 teeth each and 30 cavity preparations per group. In the experimental groups, cavities were treated with SINGLE BOND 2 (3M ESPE Adper) & Single-Bond Universal as the dentin bonding agents. After the application of the dentin bonding agents, the cavity preparations were restored with resin composite (Clearfil APX). The specimens were thermocycled, stained with methylene blue dye, and sectioned to evaluate the dye penetration. Data were analyzed using the one-way ANOVA test and Dunn’s procedure for pairwise comparison of the data. Results: This study showed that at the coronal margin and the apical margins, the preparations treated with single bond 2 adhesive (3M ESPE) showed significantly less leakage than the other groups. Enamel margins provided better marginal sealing than dentin/ cementum margins. Conclusion: The study demonstrated that 5th generation had a better sealing ability at both coronal (enamel) and apical (dentin/cementum) margins compared with the 7th generation dentin bonding agents used.

Keywords: Dentistry, mcroleakage, tooth


  Oral 057 Top



  Early Detection: A Better Prevention Top


Mohan Kadao

Sharad Pawar Dental College, Wardha, Maharashtra, India

Background: To compare the efficacy of toothbrush, ice-cream stick and cytobrush in oral PAP smear cytology for early detection of oral premalignant and malignant lesions. Objective: Toothbrush, Ice-cream stick, Cytobrush, PAP stain, Compound microscope, Gloves, Mask, Fixative, Glass slide, Slide marker. Methodology: Cytological smears with PAP stain were obtained from 50 suspicious oral malignant lesions and 50 oral leukoplakia lesions using three diagnostic tools: Toothbrush, Cytobrush, Ice-cream stick Evaluation was done with respect to three different diagnostic criteria. Results: The toothbrush cytology is a useful and efficient screening method among all three methods used in study for early detection of oral premalignant and malignant lesions. Conclusion: The toothbrush cytology is useful screening method among above mentioned all three diagnostic methods.

Keywords: Diagnosis, health, prevention


  Oral 058 Top



  Knowledge, Attitude and Practice of General Dentists towards CBCT and Dental Radiology Top


Shivangi Srivastava, Amit Reche, Aditi Thakkar, Sukeshni Jagtap, Nandini Nade

Public Health Dentistry

Background: Oral cavity is a sort of “No Man’s Land” to the general practitioner of medicine and dentistry. As dentistry moves into medical and wellness model the incorporation and proper utilization of advanced diagnostic technologies is essential. Diagnostics have a decisive impact on continuum of care and this early diagnosis helps in disease prevention, knowing early disease stage when symptoms are just beginning to appear. The introduction of CBCT heralds a true paradigm shift from 2D to 3D approach to data acquisition and image reconstruction. Objective: This study was conducted to assess the Knowledge, Attitude and Practice General Dentists towards CBCT and Dental Radiology. Methodology: A questionnaire survey dealing with knowledge, attitude and practice used in dental radiology was conducted among 250 Dental Practitioners in Sharad Pawar Dental College, Sawangi (Meghe), Wardha and Private Dental Clinics of Vidharbha region of Central India. Also, written consent was taken from each individual who were willing to participate in the study. A total of 250 dentists participated in survey, including MDS and BDS working as faculty and/or General Practitioners, Interns, and Pgs. The questionnaire consisted of two principal parts. The first part requested the demographic details of the respondents. In second part, they were questioned about the clinical methods relating to the use of CBCT, the types of radiography they use, the guidelines they follow, the technologies they prefer. The analysis was done using SPSS 16.0. Results: There were 63.6% BDS practitioners and about 35.7% MDS practitioners. It was observed that more than 63% of the practitioners had advised their patients for CBCT scan. Also, around 81.6% practitioners were satisfied with the use of CBCT and 72% of them had the view that it should be used for selected dental applications in future as well. There were 88.8% of the practitioners who believed that there should be regular training or hands on courses or evaluation of CBCT scan. Around 41.2% participants opiated that workshop will help to enhance the knowledge concerned with CBCT. Conclusion: Therefore, the present study showed better awareness of CBCT among dental practitioners and it also highlighted that majority of participants believed that CBCT was an ultimate diagnostic tool in dentistry and research.

Keywords: CBCT, dentist, radiology


  Oral 059 Top



  Conceptual Measure of Oral Health Literacy Level and Oral Health Behaviour among Street Hawkers and Fruit Vendors in Wardha: A Cross-Sectional Questionnaire Study Top


Ankita Chandarana, Amit Reche, Lalrinsangi, Sakshi Patel, Aishwarya Borgaokar

Public Health Dentistry

Background: Oral health is the most important but often neglected entity of life. Oral health literacy is dependent on the culture and society, education system, healthcare, and public health systems which in turn will have an influence on oral health outcome and costs. Studies have revealed that literacy skills and knowledge are strong predictors of an individual’s health status than age, income, employment status, education level, racial or ethnic group. Objective: The objective of this study was to investigate how oral health literacy relates to oral health behaviour, attitude and knowledge and as well as clinical dental and periodontal condition among the street hawkers and fruit vendors. Methodology: The present study was conducted from January 2019 to March 2019. A cross-sectional study was held among street hawkers and fruit vendors from Wardha. A questionnaire was given to 380 street hawkers and fruit vendors to assess their oral health literacy, knowledge, practices, attitude, treatment and hygiene. They were informed and consent was obtained. Assessment of participants oral health knowledge included items on effects of brushing, the meaning of bleeding gums and its prevention, effect of caries & its appearance. Assessment of oral health behaviours included brushing activity, dental hygiene, dental education & dental visits. Results: The results show that 80% of the participants knew the value of teeth, 60% participants think that decayed tooth can affect the appearance, 70% of the participants thought that visiting dentist can help in prevention of dental problems, 25% of the participants visited the dentist, 30% of the participants thought that visiting to dentist is necessary, 60% think that teeth are an important part of body, 35% of the participants had severe dental pain, 70% use toothpaste and toothbrush, 98% of them clean their teeth once a day, while 2% brushed twice a day, 70% use kharra, 10% use beedi and 20% use Gutkha, 97% knew that smoking causes cancer. Conclusion: Our findings indicated that oral health literacy was associated with differences with oral health behaviours and clinical oral health status and understanding of oral health literacy and oral health behaviour. Systematic community based oral health promotion should be strengthened, and preventive oriented oral health care system are needed including the promotion of further self-care practices.

Keywords: Dentistry, health, literacy


  Oral 060 Top



  Effect of Nonsurgical Periodontal Therapy on Chronic Kidney Disease Patients Top


Ranu R. Oza, Varsha Sharma, Komal Suryavanshi

Sharad Pawar Dental College, Wardha, Maharashtra, India

Background: Periodontal disease has been highlighted as an important potential risk factor for non-communicable diseases such as chronic kidney disease (CKD), diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular diseases, and pulmonary diseases. Studies have reported that patients suffering from end-stage renal failure (ESRF) and those receiving dialysis are more prone to periodontal disease. Dialysis patients may form calculus more rapidly than healthy individuals possibly due to high salivary urea and phosphate levels. Studies prove that non-surgical periodontal therapy significantly improves the periodontal status and also reduces inflammatory mediators which ultimately improve the glomerular filtration rate. Objective: To assess the effect of non- surgical periodontal therapy in patients suffering from chronic kidney disease, evaluate changes in renal function in terms of e-GFR and albumin:creatinine ratio. Methodology: Twenty patients with chronic kidney disease (group 1) and 20 individuals without clinical evidence of kidney disease (group 2) with chronic periodontitis were subjected to non-surgical periodontal treatment. Clinical periodontal and systemic parameters were evaluated at baseline and 3 months after treatment. A detailed periodontal status was recorded on data collection proforma for both the groups. Serum creatinine levels were obtained for CKD patients. To calculate the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) values, the Cockcroft and Gault equation was used to estimate the clearance of creatinine. Changes were compared to baseline after 3 months. Results: Both groups showed significant post-treatment improvements in all periodontal parameters examined. Statistically significant changes were seen with pocket depth, clinical attachment loss, serum creatinine and e-GFR. No statistically significant change was seen with bleeding on probing. Conclusion: The present interventional study demonstrates that CKD patients show a good clinical periodontal and systemic response from non-surgical periodontal therapy.

Keywords: Health, kidney, periodontics


  Oral 061 Top



  Oral Cancer Stigma as a Barrier to Medical Health Seeking Behavior Top


Sunakshi Kanfade, Shravani Deolia, Ishani Nilajkar, Prasanna Sonar, ZodinPuii

Public Health Dentistry

Background: The lesions of oral cancer have silent nature which is responsible for delay in diagnosis and responsible for this increase incidence of advanced stage of oral cancer. It causes substantial damage in swallowing and chewing function, speech, etc. Patients diagnosed by oral cancer start developing stigma. Fear of diagnosis, death, pain from treatment and stigma are several myths that can have a negative impact on health outcomes among cancer survivors. Objective: The purpose of the study was to improve our understanding of why Oral cancer patient delays their presentation with oral cancer. Methodology: The study was conducted amongst the patient who were reported to the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery who had symptoms of oral cancer. The purpose of the study was explained, and a written consent was taken from each participant in the study prior to data collection. A questionnaire of 23 close ended questions were given to the patients included in this study. The questionnaire collected the information about the demographic detail, questions regarding oral cancer stigma from shame and stigma scale. Results: For the study 156 oral cancer patients were selected out of which 69.2% of the population were males, according to the study 51% of patients felt that others are responsible for development of their condition, a large number of patients with 41% felt that the people surrounding them were strained when they were around them, around 38% of patients avoided meeting others as they felt that people often stare at them. Study shows that 50.6% of patients got good family support for seeking treatment. Conclusion: It was found that there was stigma associated with cancer. Thus, there is a need to create awareness so that it is reported in early stages for prompt treatment to improve prognosis.

Keywords: Cancer, dentistry, health


  Oral 062 Top



  A study on Relationship of Parenting Styles, Child Temperament, and Operatory Behaviour in Healthy Children Top


Neha Barde

Department of Pedodontics, Sharad Pawar Dental College, Wardha, Maharashtra, India

Background: Child temperament is an important factor associated with aspects of oral healthcare. Temperament is the “how” of behavior, a “behavioral style,” or the characteristic way that a child experiences and responds to the environment. Our Research includes the parent-child bonding and their inter-linkage with each other and can predict their child’s behavior. We have included three distinctive kind of parenting style created by Baumrind (1966): authoritarian, authoritative, permissive. The Parenting Styles and Dimensions Questionnaire (PSDQ) is one significant measurement to survey the dimension of a parent’s child. Aim and Objective: Our objective is to hypothesize the parenting styles and temperament which significantly influence the children’s behavior during dental procedures. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study and observational study was conducted on parents visiting the department of pedodontics and the resident doctors of sharad pawar dental college and hospital using questionnaire. Questionnaire containing thirty two questions was given to parents and resident doctor. The components were: Demographic component the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI). Demographic component like age, gender, the variables studied were: gender, and age. Eight questions were asked for authoritarian, eight for authoritative and eight for permissive were asked to hypothesized that the parenting styles and temperament significantly influenced children’s behavior amid dental procedures. Questionnaire evaluates the relationship of the child’s behaviour, parenting styles, and parents’ prediction of their child’s behavior during simple dental treatment. Descriptive analysis was carried out in order to evaluate the measures of the collected result. Results: The study sample included 77 Parents/guardians with their children. Half of the children were of Age ranged from 9-12 years, their exact percentage was 50.6% while children aged 5-8 years were 40.3% and the children aged 0-4 were 9.1%. There were 49 boys and 28 girls that is their percentage was 63.6% and 36.4% respectively. The distribution of the parents prediction of behaviour using Frankl Scale was more towards positive behaviour with only 3% and 2.5% of children predicted as definitely negative and negative, respectively. In terms of accuracy of parental predicted behaviour, 83.1% of parents were accurate in their predictions of behaviour. Conclusion: Our study findings relate that there was direct relationship between parenting styles and child behavior which influences the dental operatory behaviour of children.

Keywords: Behaviour, children, parenting


  Oral 063 Top



  Health Seeking Behaviour of Patients with Premalignant Lesion Top


Mrunmayee Khare, Ritika Arora, Rana Chikhale, Revti Korde

Department of Public Health Dentistry, Datta Meghe Institute of Medical Sciences, Wardha, Maharashtra, India

Background: Most of the general public is poorly informed about the risk of oral potentially malignant disorder and ways to prevent this disease. Good oral health is known to be an integral part of general wellbeing and a contributory factor to the quality of life. But a patient considers several factors before he/she chooses and/or visits a dentist. Objective: To evaluate the health seeking behaviour of patients with premalignant lesions. Methodology: The cross-sectional study was conducted among the patients who consulted in the Department of Oral Medicine and Radiology, of age 18 and above suffering from precancerous lesions. A total number of 200 patients were selected for the main survey. The patients who had precancerous lesions were included in the study. All the patients who were not showing signs of precancerous lesions and those which progressed into malignancies were excluded from the study. The patients previously diagnosed with precancerous lesions were given the questionnaire. The questions answered in yes and no were analysed on dichotomous scale and the remaining questions were analysed on the frequency of performing oral hygiene practices, frequency of dental visits, frequency of deleterious habits and their opinion regarding the importance of oral hygiene. Results: Participants interpreted their symptoms as a minor condition and did not consider it as requiring immediate attention. Socio-economic factors, cultural beliefs and religious practices have some influence on diagnostic delay. Conclusion: Low levels of public knowledge and awareness regarding early signs and symptoms results in worsening of the condition. some participants expressed strong beliefs in traditional medicine. Psychological factors such as fear and denial resulted in participants’ avoidance coping strategy in response to their symptoms.

Keywords: Behaviour, cancer, health


  Oral 064 Top



  Evaluation of Association of Periodontal Disease as a Potential Risk Factor for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Top


Deeba Sheikh

Department of Periodontics, Datta Meghe Institute of Medical Sciences, Wardha, Maharashtra, India

Background: The present study was conducted to evaluate potential association between respiratory diseases and periodontal health status and correlate the severity of periodontal disease with that of COPD. Aim and Objective: To evaluate potential association between respiratory diseases and periodontal health status and correlate the severity of periodontal disease with that of COPD. Materials and Methods: A total of 50 patients (25 patients with COPD and 25 healthy controls) were selected from the out-patient department of Medicine and pulmonary medicine, AVBRH, Sawangi (Meghe). Intraoral examination included evaluation of oral hygiene status of the patients using full mouth plaque index, full mouth papillary bleeding index and by measuring probing pocket depth (PPD),gingival recession(GR), clinical attachment level (CAL). Information regarding lung function was estimated by measuring forced expiratory volume with the help of spirometry. Results: Subjects with COPD had significantly higher mean CAL (4.22 ± 0.56) and a higher mean OHI score (3.37 ± 0.48) than those without COPD (CAL: 3.92 ± 0.53; OHI:2.878 ± 0.64). Also, the percentage of subjects with <20% bleeding sites was significantly higher in subjects without COPD. The risk for COPD appeared to be significantly elevated when attachment loss was found to be severe (CAL ?? 3.5 mm) when compared to the healthy group. Conclusion: The results of this study indicate that poor periodontal health status is associated with an increased severity of COPD. It was found that patients with a history of COPD had more mean clinical attachment loss than those without COPD. The risk for COPD appeared to be significantly elevated when attachment loss was found to be severe. Also, lung function appeared to diminish as the amount of attachment loss increased. Also, the oral hygiene scores and percentage of gingival bleeding sites were found to be significantly associated with the severity of COPD. It is conceivable that improved oral health may help prevent the progression of COPD. Oral interventions that improve oral health status may prove to lower the severity of lung infection in susceptible populations.

Keywords: COPD, dentistry, periodontics


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  Knowledge and Perception of Dental Clinicians toward Radiological Waste Management in Dentistry Top


Mrunalini Chouksey

Sharad Pawar Dental College (DMIMS), Wardha, Maharashtra, India

Background: Oral and maxillofacial radiology is the daily part and parcel of dental practice. It does contribute a major section to the biomedical waste generated in the dental clinic. Pollution can be controlled only if the clinicians are aware about appropriate waste collection and disposal methods. This study aims toward evaluating the knowledge of clinicians toward this issue. Aim and Objective: To evaluate knowledge and perception of dental clinicians toward radiological waste management in dentistry. Materials and Methods: A survey was performed for a sample size of 112 dental clinicians in wardha, Maharashtra. A questionnaire was designed with close ended questions with a maximum choice of two to four responses and performance containing 29 questions in which 7 were based on knowledge, 5 were based on attitude and 17 were based on practice before dental clinicians for recording their response. Results: According to the collected data 24% of dentist discard more than 1 litre developer and fixer solution per month. Pertaining to the fixer and developer solution 33% clinicians go with the response supporting the fact that used fixer is hazardous and only a 29% of responders support that used developer solution is hazardous. In case of digital radiography 51% dentists support the fact that digital radiography does not create waste which is not true as it does create electronic waste, waste from the sensors and other devices as well as a small amount of biodegradable waste and 40% responded digital radiography armamentarium create hazardous waste whereas 27% create recyclable waste and 4% biodegradable waste. Conclusion: In India, dentists pay no attention to waste management because they have no knowledge regarding waste management program. Poor dental waste management exposes the workers of health care facility, waste handlers and the community as a whole to infection, toxic effects and injuries. The results of this present study found many irregularities in the handling and discarding of the radiographic residues and lack of knowledge and awareness about proper dental waste management among dental health care providers. The large amount of radiographic solutions and their incorrect handling are of great concern, and the governmental agencies should supervise such actions to protect both the health and the environment.

Keywords: Clinicians, dentistry, radiology


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  Study of Antibiotic Prophylaxis in Clean Contaminated Wound in Relation with Dental Extraction Top


Priyanka Anil Sonavane, Rajnikanth Kambala

Sharad Pawar Dental College, Wardha, Maharashtra, India

Background: Tooth extraction surgery is one of the most commonly performed procedures in oral surgery. Prophylactic antibiotics therapy is defined as “the administration of any antimicrobial agent that prevents the development of disease”. In recent era, an increase of antibiotic resistance has been documented for a vast number of microorganisms from various diseases and sources. Correct patient selection and preparation, careful handling of the tissues and proper wound care can reduce the infection rate and the need for antibiotic coverage. Aim and Objective: The purpose of this study is to find out whether antibiotics are necessary to prevent infection after therapeutic extraction. Materials and Methods: Study was conducted on 15 subjects. Healthy patients with good oral hygiene for therapeutic extraction of premolars for orthodontic purpose were included in this study. Exclusion criteria included immuno-compromised patients, patients with local or systemic infection, history of any antibiotic usage in last 1 month, history of allergy to penicillin and infected premolars. All subjects were given an antibiotic (amoxicillin) following the extraction and observed after day-3 and day-7. The procedure of tooth extraction was performed on the same patients without post extraction use of antibiotics and they were observed after 3 and 7 days. Results: Result was established by using VAS scale for measuring pain. All patients showed pain post extraction after 3 days. Post extraction, after 7 days, 20% of patients with the use of antibiotics showed pain while 26.5% without the use of antibiotics remained painless. Conclusion: Prophylactic use of antibiotics in clean and contaminated wound in relation with dental extraction in relatively healthy patients is not essential.

Keywords: Antibiotics, dentistry, wound


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  Comparative Evaluation of Change in pH of Calcium Hydroxide Mixed with Different Vehicles in Presence of Dentin: An In vitro Study Top


Ishita Sawhney, Abhilasha Dass Mishra

Department of Conservative Dentistry and Endodontics, Sharad Pawar Dental College, Wardha, Maharashtra, India

Background: Elimination of microorganisms from the root canal system is an essential step in endodontic therapy. Calcium hydroxide is one of the most widely used intra canal medicament in endodontics. It is a slowly working antiseptic which not only kills bacteria but also reduces the effect of the remaining cell wall material lipo -polysaccharide. Antimicrobial effect of calcium hydroxide is due to release of hydroxyl ions in an aqueous environment which leads to denaturation and damage of DNA and cytoplasmic membrane of bacteria. Objectives: Therefore, purpose of this study was to evaluate the change in pH of calciumHydroxide mixed with four different vehicles Saline, Betadine, 2% Chlorhexidine gluconate, 5.25% Sodium hypochlorite in presence of dentin. Materials and Methods: Twenty five human extracted teeth were selected and cleaned with distilled water and autoclaved at 121oC for 15 minutes. Dentin powder was obtained using spherical dental bur from the root canals. Solutions were taken in different flasks and divided into four groups: saline, betadine, 2% Chlorhexidine gluconate, 5.25% Sodium hypochlorite. Dentin powder was added as 1.8% of the volume. pH was assessed at four different time periods: immediately after preparation, after 24 hours, 7days and 14 days. Results: Significant differences were found within the groups at different time intervals and also within the group with overall reduction in pH of solutions with time. Conclusion: Based on the result of this study it can be concluded that pH plays a key role in the antimicrobial property of Calcium hydroxide mixed with different vehicles.

Keywords: Calcium, dentin, dentistry


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  Feeding Practices as Precursor of Early Childhood Caries in Rural Population of Vidharbharegion Top


Akansha Bansod, Nishi Malviya, Utkarsh Umre, Gaurav Varma

Department of Public Health Dentistry, Sharad Pawar Dental College, Wardha, Maharashtra, India

Background: Dental caries is a multifactorial disease. It is one of the most common chronic diseases of early childhood. Dental problems in early childhood have been shown to be predictive of future dental problems, growth and development by interfering with comfort, nutrition, concentration, and school participation. Of particular concern is the group of very young children who suffer from the condition known as “Early Childhood Caries” (ECC). Aim and Objective: (1) To assess the impact of feeding habits on the prevalence of early childhood caries in a population where prolonged breastfeeding is a norm. (2)To assess daytime sugar intake on the prevalence of early childhood caries in a population where prolonged breastfeeding is a norm. (3) To determine the relation of feeding habits and day time sugar intake habits on the prevalence of early childhood caries. Materials and Methodology: It was a community based cross sectional study. The sample included children who visited the hospitals during the working days in the month of February 2019, producing the total sample of 100 children consisting of 49 boys and 51 girls. Mothers were interviewed based on a structured questionnaire and Intraoral examinations of the child was carried out using mouth mirror and WHO probe for assessing “deft” index. Results: In the present study, the mother’s age varied from 21 to 32 years, mean age being 26.5 years. Children belonged to the age group of 22 to 35 months. amongst the children who participated in the study, 49% of them were males, rest 51% being females. Breastfeeding was the norm: of the children 88% were breastfed and 12% were bottle fed. Among the breastfed children, 48% were fed for more than 6 months duration. Among the bottle fed children, 46% were fed for more than 6 months duration. The overall prevalence of ECC was found to be 31.8%. A significant association was found between the history of bottle-feeding and ECC (P = 0.0218). Prevalence of ECC was more among those who were bottle-fed than those who were not bottle-fed. Conclusion: On account of feeding practices in association with ECC, milk-bottle feeding at night should be limited. Future health promotion and education programs should include oral health issues and the risk factors for ECC, and its consequences should be addressed. Public-funded oral health program should be started and targeted at children from lower socioeconomic status.

Keywords: Childhood, feeding, health


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  Effect of Oral Health Education and Instructions on Oral Health Status and Practices of Visually Impaired Children Using Braille Top


Kiran Kelani, Amit Reche, Nandani Jaiswal, Shyam Chandak, Vaishnavi Babhare

Public Health Dentistry

Background: Oral health has a massive influence on overall health and well-being of every individual. Visually impaired children are always in disadvantage as they are often unable to adequately apply the techniques of controlling plaque and avoiding caries. Braille is a tactile writing system used by people who are visually impaired. These children lack the ability to maintain good oral health, since they cannot detect and recognize early oral diseases. Objective: This study was conducted to assess the oral health knowledge, attitude and awareness of these children using Braille based questionnaire to evaluate the oral hygiene practice following oral hygiene instructions in Braille. Methodology: The present study was conducted from December 2018 to March 2019. In this study, 50 visually impaired children were selected. Information regarding oral health knowledge, oral health awareness and oral hygiene practices of children was obtained by a structured questionnaire which was printed in Braille. At baseline, Simplified Oral Hygiene Index (OHI-S) was recorded. Braille printed instructions were provided to the children. The next visit was held on the 90th day. The purpose of this visit was to estimate the effectiveness of the oral health education. The OHI-S index was rerecorded to check the oral health status. Data collected was analyzed using Statistical Package of Social Sciences (statistics for Windows, version 16.0), using paired t-test to find the difference between the knowledge and OHI-S before and after the oral hygiene instructions were given. The p value was significant when less than 0.05% (Confidence level of 95%). Results: A total of 50 visually impaired children belonging to the age group of 6-13 years with average age of 9.6 years were enrolled comprising of 26 males and 24 females. At the start of the study only 30% children had good OHI-S score which was increased to 76% after the intervention. 70% of the children were aware of the importance of oral health over the general health of the body. 64% of the children were aware that there are two sets of dentitions. Conclusion: To conclude, the awareness among visually impaired children was found to be low at the start of the study. This study proved to be an effective tool for improvement of oral hygiene knowledge, oral hygiene practice and oral hygiene awareness among visually impaired children.

Keywords: Blind, children, education


  Oral 070 Top



  To Correlate the Pindborg’s Grading System of Oral Submucous Fibrosis with Mouth Blowing Method and Cheek Retractor Method for Checking Cheek Flexibility Top


Rahul Jain

Sharad Pawar Dental College, Wardha, Maharashtra, India

Background: Oral submucous fibrosis [OSMF] is a chronic debilitating disease of the oral cavity characterized by inflammation and progressive fibrosis of the submucosal tissues. Pindborg and his associates defined the condition as “an insidious chronic disease affecting any part of the oral cavity and sometimes pharynx. Although occasionally preceded by and/or associated with vesicle formation, it is always associated with juxtaepithelial inflammatory reaction followed by fibroelastic changes in the lamina propria, with epithelial atrophy leading to stiffness of the oral mucosa causing trismus and difficulty in eating. The pathogenesis of the disease is not well known, but the etiology is believed to be multifactorial. The condition is particularly associated with areca nut chewing, which is the main component of betel quid. The habit of betel quid chewing is practiced predominately in the Indian subcontinent from a long time. The advantages and disadvantages of these systems supersede the other leading to confusion. Yet, there is a big lacunae in the present scenario which correlates the clinical findings among each other. Pindborg suggested the classification based on the clinical findings. There are few researches done to grade OSMF on the basis of cheek flexibility using mouth blowing technique and using cheek retractor method. Till date on research is done on Comparative evaluation of cheek flexibility using cheek retractor method and mouth blowing method and its correlation with Pindborg’s grading system for oral submucous fibrosis patient. Methods: The study included 118 patients who have been diagnosed with OSMF attending to the Department of Oral Medicine and Radiology. And patient who have diagnosed with grade 4 OSMF are excluded. A detailed history and examination of the patients was performed with special emphasis on measuring cheek flexibility and mouth blowing method. Statistical analysis was done using Chi-square test and p<0.05 was considered to be statistically significant. Results: Values obtained by blowing method are more close to pindborg et al grading system then with the cheek retractor hence blowing method will be better diagnostic method for OSMF. Conclusion: The observations of the present study have led to the Correlation of Pindborg’s Grading System of Oral Submucous Fibrosis with blowing method and cheek retractor method for checking cheek flexibility.

Keywords: Cheek, fibrosis, pindborg


  Oral 071 Top



  To Evaluate the Relationship between Subjective Well-being and Oral Discomfort in Elderly People Top


Humsini Ramprasad

Sharad Pawar Dental College, Wardha, Maharashtra, India

Background: A person’s subjective wellbeing directly involves the assessment of quality of life and therefore health but also refers to how people experience their quality of life, including both emotional and cognitive judgments. The subjective well-being scale explains the people’s experience of multiple psychosocial losses in the final period of life, including bereavement of close friends and family. Objective: To evaluate the relationship between subjective well-being and oral discomfort in elderly people. Methodology: Analysing the subjective well-being in older people is a cross sectional study conducted at Sharad Pawar Dental College, sawangi (meghe), wardha. Inclusion criteria were people aged above 60 years of age and people having certain mental and physical disabilities were excluded. Data was collected from each individual following a closed structural questionnaire format that included a set of questions related to demographic profile and social data (age, sex, marital status, income, educations) and oral discomfort data (dry mouth, difficulty in speech, difficulty in mastication, missing tooth, carious tooth, difficulty in chewing, altered taste sensations, vague pain, swelling, burning sensation) also self-related certain habits such as smoking, drinking etc. for this above data a SUBJECTIVE WELL BEING SCALE WAS USED. A total of 200 people aged above 60 years were examined under natural light conditions. The total score is sum of all scores assigned to all the 62 items of SW. B scale. Results: Participants were 200 people aged 60-89 years (mean of 69 ± 6.9 years). The majority were male (67 %), had incomplete higher education (28.5 %), had an income of up to one minimum wage. The mean SWB score (subscale 1) was associated with age ranged between 61-65 years (94%), gender, health in the previous year, systemic diseases, speech problems, vision problems, number of teeth, and dry mouth .SWB (subscale 2) was associated with gender, skin color, general health, health in the previous year, systemic diseases, drinking, soft tissue problems, and pain for no apparent reason. It is being stated that around 149 people of 200 agree with fact that subjective well-being is related with oral discomfort. Conclusion: The relationship between oral discomfort and SWB reveals that older people’s poor oral health leads to physical, psychological, and/or social problems that directly interfere with their well-being.

Keywords: Denstistry, geriatrics, health


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  Health Care Seeking Behaviour for Common Oral Diseases in Rural Area: A Community Based House to House Survey Top


Shravani Deolia, Koyal Kela, Ishita Sawhney, Priyanka Sonavane

Department of Public Health Dentistry, Sharad Pawar Dental College, Wardha, Maharashtra, India

Background: The oral cavity has been described as an integral part of general health. Oral Diseases affects large number of population since ages but awareness regarding it is still very little. Hence oral diseases have been termed as ‘neglected epidemic’. The reported risk factors that affect its occurrence include age, sex, socioeconomic status, race, geographical location, food habits, and oral hygiene practices. HSB i.e. health seeking behaviour means an extended period of patients delay in presentation following the onset of symptoms is hypothesized to provide an important explication for diagnosis at an advanced stage. There are number of reasons why people do not visit clinicians soon after noticing symptoms. Also, patients may have inadequate or incorrect knowledge to appropriately interpret the relevance of their symptoms to oral disease. This may be called as the “patient delay” or “diagnostic delay. So when it comes to rural population; many challenges exist pertaining to the betterment of oral health care. Objective: The aim is to study the perception of people belonging to rural areas about common oral diseases and their health seeking behaviour related to those diseases. Methods: The study was conducted in the rural areas of Wardha on a population between the age group of 18 years and above. Sample was selected by stratified random sampling technique. An informed consent was signed by each patient before filling the questionnaire. Data was recorded by a structured interview in this study. Results: The results obtained from 700 subjects tell that most common experienced dental problem is tooth pain 33.7%. Most common reason for not visiting dentist was poor attitude of rural population towards dental problems and fear amongst patients which constituted 24.3% of sample. Conclusion: Conclusion made through our study tells us that it is the poor attitude, fear and less awareness amongst the rural population which leads to negligence towards oral health which is quite evident. So efforts must be made to bring a change in this scenario.

Keywords: Behaviour, dentistry, rural


  Oral 073 Top



  Dentists’ Opinion on Using Digital Technology in Dental Practice Top


Drishti Nagi

Department of Public Health Dentistry, Sharad Pawar Dental College, DMIMS, Sawangi, Wardha, Maharashtra, India

Background: The digital revolution is changing the world and dentistry in no exception. When using digital technologies, users opinion and extent of use of technologies differ among professional groups. Use of digital technologies influences oral health care, and the way in which oral health care is practiced influences the use of digital dental technologies. This impact needs to be understood when implementing technologies and using it in dental practice. Aim and Objective: The objective of the study was to investigate which opinions among dentists were associated with the level of technology they use, when characteristics of dentist and dental practise were taken into consideration. Materials and Methodology: This study was conducted in private dental college of Wardha after obtaining ethical approval. The purpose of the study was explained, and informed consent was taken from the dentist. The objectives of the study were explained to the participants before commencing with the main survey. The study included dental professionals like postgraduates, faculty and private practitioners from Wardha, Nagpur and Chandrapur. A total of two hundred dental professionals were selected. A structured questionnaire was provided which included demographic details like name, age, gender, speciality and working hours per week. The questionnaire consisted of twenty-five closed ended questions. The first question depended upon the digital technology used by the dentist and was analysed using dichotomous scale. Twenty-four questions were marked on Likert scale. Each question was assessed using 5-point scale: strongly agree, agree, neutral, disagree, strongly disagree. The collected data was tabulated and analysed using SPSS version 21. Results: Dentists who were high technology users perceived technologies as more yielding more improvements in quality of care, adding more value to the dental practice and being easier to use than the low technology user. High technology users thought technologies added more value to their work and reported higher skills and resources. Conclusion: Opinions on digital technologies among dentists and motivating work aspects varied with level of technology use. Being more focused on technologies and perceiving a higher added value from using them were associated with using more digital dental technology, when taking into account motivating work aspects and characteristics of the dentist and dental practice.

Keywords: Dentistry, health, technology


  Oral 074 Top



  Assessment of Correlation between Tooth Morphology and Psychology Top


Aishwarya Bansal

Sharad Pawar Dental College, Wardha, Maharashtra, India

Background: A healthy smile is definitely a powerful tool. Visagism is the science which explores the possible connection between your personality and your teeth shape. According to this concept, clinicians can design a smile that blends with the patient’s physical appearance, personality, and desires. Objective: To evaluate the co- relation between the dentofacial esthetics and the five mental temperaments through the concept of visagism. Methodology: A total of 102 participants aged between 20 and 35 years among medical professionals were selected for the study. The temperaments of the participants were identified using a self-reporting questionnaire and classified according to Big Five Personality Traits (Extraversion, Agreeableness, Conscientiousness, Neuroticism and Openness). The photographs of frontal view of teeth in centric occlusion of the participants were captured, and their tooth forms, long axes, and embrasure lines were drawn using photograph editing software. The type of temperament obtained from the questionnaire for each participant was compared with tooth form (oval, square, rectangle and triangular) obtained from photographic evaluation. Results: Females (82.4%) were more than males with a mean age of 23 year. One-way ANOVA test depicted extraversion has square tooth form (mean=26.79±3.81). Conscientiousness trait had oval tooth form (mean = 31.04±4.85). The chi-square test presented that square tooth form showed extraversion trait (34.1%) and neuroticism (31.6%). Rectangle tooth form showed agreeableness (30.4%) and openness (30.8%). Conscientiousness showed same value with oval and square tooth form (31.6%). However, the results were statistically insignificant (p>0.05). Conclusion: Although the concept of combining the principles of smile design and mental temperaments through visagism is an appreciable idea, it lacks a practical approach to create a personalized smile for each patient by including mental temperaments at present stage.

Keywords: Morphology, pshycology, teeth


  Oral 075 Top



  To Compare the Microleakage in Cavities Restored with Nanohybrid Composite Resin and Microfilled Composite Resin by using Oblique Incremental Technique: An In vitro Study Top


Krishna Shah, Nikhil Mankar

Department of Conservative and Endodontic Dentistry, Sharad Pawar Dental College, Datta Meghe Institute of Medical Sciences (DU), Wardha, Maharashtra, India

Background: Resin composites are widely used due to patient’s high demands, although resin composites are the most commonly used it has some disadvantages. Aim and Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of nanohybrid and microfilled composite resin in regard to microleakage in class I cavity restoration. Materials and Methods: Thirty standardized class I cavities were prepared at the occlusal surfaces of each tooth. The cavities were prepared using number 245 carbide bur under copious water coolant using a high-speed handpiece. Depth of cavity was 0.5 mm into the dentin. Etchant was applied for 15 seconds and cavities were rinsed with water and air dried. Bonding agent was applied and light cured. The specimens were divided into two groups and were restored with composite resin. Group A (n=15): Restored with nanohybrid composite resin using oblique incremental technique and light cured. Group B (n =15): Restored with microfilled composite resin using oblique incremental technique and light cured. The specimens were stored in 1% chloramine beta-hemihydrate solution for 24 hours and were subjected to thermocycling. The tooth surface were isolated with two layer of finger nail varnish except for 2 mm around the restoration and immersed in 2 % methylene blue for 24 hours. The nail varnish was removed and specimens were sectioned through centre of restoration using a diamond disk and were analyzed for dye penetration with a stereomicroscope in 12 x magnification. Scoring was done on a criteria of 0-4 scale. Results: Statistical analysis was performed using CHI square test. Conclusion: Under the limitations of this study none of the material were free from microleakage. However, nanohybrid composite resin showed better marginal adaptation of restoration as compared to microfilled composite resin.

Keywords: Dentistry, microleakage, resin


  Oral 076 Top



  Rotating Shift work, Sleep, and Accidents Related to Sleepiness in Doctors Top


Shravani Deolia, Christina Pachuau, Gargi Nimbhorkar, Angel Yangad, Sanjana Basu

Department of Public Health Dentistry, Shard Pawar Dental College, Datta Meghe Institute of Medical Sciences, Sawangi (Meghe), Wardha, Maharashtra, India

Background: Sleep deprivation has been shown to negatively impact judgement and performance of doctors leading to errors and accidents. Concern for iatrogenic risks to patients caused by doctors experiencing sleep disruption due to rotating shifts has led to a re-examination of the work schedules and sleep patterns of physicians. Thus attempt was made to assess the effect of rotating shifts on an employee’s performance and well-being. Objective: The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of rotating shift work, sleep and accidents related to sleepiness in doctors and to evaluate the sleep patterns, disturbances and difficulties to sleep in rotating shift doctors with respect to day/evening doctors. Methods: A cross-sectional, observational study was conducted on doctors of a Tertiary Care Hospital. A close ended questionnaire, containing 25 questions, was circulated among doctors for assessment of their sleep patterns and workability to evaluate effects of sleep deprivation. Participants were doctors (residents and interns) who worked rotating shifts. Questions presented were regarding sleep disturbances, sleeping aids or other means to get to sleep; and accidents, errors, and “near-miss” accidents in the past year including automobile accidents, medication errors, on-the-job procedural errors, and on-the-job personal injuries that the doctors had reported to have occurred because of sleepiness due to rotating shifts. Results: It was observed that doctors reporting to night shifts suffered from decreased and disturbed sleep, irritability, fatigue and poor reflexes. According to our study, almost all the subjects suffered from poor work and sleep quality due to their changing work shifts. Conclusion: Rotating work shifts have a direct effect on workability and quality and amount of sleep in an individual. Thus it is suggested that appropriate work related policies should be adopted to ensure benefits to physicians and safety of patients.

Keywords: Doctors, sleep, work


  Oral 077 Top



  Insights of Medico-Legal Problems among Dental Professionals Top


Shravani Deolia, Murtaza Hussain, Himanshu Shende, Jenish Barochia

Department of Public Health Dentistry, Shard Pawar Dental College, Datta Meghe Institute of Medical Sciences, Sawangi (Meghe), Wardha, Maharashtra, India

Background: The health profession has long been considered as the “noble profession.” The trend, however, has changed in recent decades – the doctor is increasingly looked upon as someone who provides service for consideration. Nevertheless, the element of trust is still firm but; on occasions when the faith in a doctor is breached, patients may not look upon the health provider sympathetically. These issues are very sensitive, due to some malpractices of doctors, people started looking at doctor’s community with distrust. Dental malpractice refers to malpractice for an injury resulting from negligent work, failure to diagnose or treat a hazardous condition, or any intentional misconduct on the part of dentist. Therefore every practitioner needs not only a thorough understanding of the principles of consent, but also an awareness of how to apply these principles in the wide variety of circumstances that can arise in the practice of dentistry. Objectives: (1) To evaluate the knowledge, attitude and practice of medico-legal problems among dental professionals in Wardha. Methods: The present study will be conducted in Department of Public Health Dentistry of Datta Meghe Institute of Medical sciences. The study will be conducted among various doctors in Wardha. The purpose of the study will help us to evaluate the insights of Medico-legal problems among dental professionals. The primary data will be collected through questionnaires applied to the subjects. Doctors will be assessed on the basis of their knowledge, attitude and practice using the questionnaire given to them. The findings will be recorded accordingly and the conclusion will be drawn on the basis of the study. Results: Out of 180 participants, there were 89 male (49%) and 91 females (51%). The mean age of the subject was 26.4 years. 55% of the doctors weren’t aware that the x-ray or any other reports belong to the patients. Only 57% of the dentists knew that grievance injury to the tooth is punishable. Around 50% of the doctors knew that the patient records should be preserved for a minimum of 7 years. 20% of the doctor’s population lacked the knowledge of taking informed consent.

Keywords: Dentistry, legal, medicine


  Oral 078 Top



  Ethical Issues in Research Biopsies: A Review Top


Ravikant Vijayrao Sune

Department of Oral Pathology and Microbiology, Sharad Pawar Dental College, Wardha, Maharashtra, India

Background: Biopsy for histopathologic examination is considered the gold standard for diagnosis of oral cancer. Researchers are increasingly interested in analysis of biomarkers to understand the molecular biology of cancer. For the purpose of molecular or histologic understanding, clinical trials with research biopsies are opted. However mandatory research biopsies have raised ethical issues. Objectives: Some ethical issues need to be answered before conducting clinical trials requiring mandatory biopsies such as amount of harm to the participants, ambiguity of participants regarding compulsion of biopsy related to intervention in the study and benefit from the procedure, and the adequacy of informed consent. Review Findings: Research question should be properly framed with well designed clinical trial, biopsy procedure should be carried with minimal harm to the patient, and informed consent to be taken from patient so that they clearly understand the procedures during trial, risk anticipated, rationale and requirement of the study as well as alternatives options to the treatment. More issues may need to be discussed. Conclusion: If ethical issues are sorted out, the participants with cancer or precancer may willingly participate and understand the efficacy of clinical trial and the benefits, direct or indirect, of the outcome of the study.

Keywords: Biopsies, ethics, research


  Oral 079 Top



  Comparative Evaluation of Accuracy of Two Conventional Iris Positioning Method with the Laser Pointer Method Top


Vikram Belkhode

Department of Prosthodontics, Sharad Pawar Dental College, Wardha, Maharashtra, India

Background: Iris positioning is one of the important steps in the fabrication of customized ocular prosthesis. The accurate alignment of the iris in the artificial eye will influence the final aesthetic effect of the restoration. Aim and Objective: (1) To evaluate the accuracy of iris positioning by facial line method, (2) To evaluate the accuracy of iris positioning by facial grid method, (3) To evaluate the accuracy of iris positioning by laser pointer method, (4) Comparison of laser pointer method with facial line method and facial grid method. Materials and Methods: Total number of 105 subjects were selected, reporting to the department of Prosthodontics. The procedure was carried out in the normal patient without any eye defect. The data was obtained by performing all three methods of iris positioning i.e Facial line method, Facial grid method and laser pointer method on the same patient. The values for positioning of iris was determined first for the right eye and then the values was evaluated for left eye by all the three methods for all subjects. Results: Statistical analysis was done by using descriptive and inferential statistics using student’s paired t test and software used in the analysis was SPSS 22.0 version and p<0.05 is considered as level of significance. The Facial line method and Facial grid method showed statistically significant p value whereas the result for laser pointer method did not show statistically significant p value. Conclusion: Comparative analysis of three method shows that laser pointer method is more accurate as compared to other two methods.

Keywords: Evaluation, iris, ophthalmology


  Oral 080 Top



  Utility of a Mobile Phone Colorimeter Application in Assessing the Change in Color of Maxillofacial Silicone before and after Curing Top


Sharayu Nimonkar

Department of Prosthodontics, Sharad Pawar Dental College, Wardha, Maharashtra, India

Background: Prosthetic rehabilitation of maxillofacial defects is a challenging task for prosthodontist. Matching the color of the maxillofacial silicone plays a key role in the success of the maxillofacial prosthesis. Aim and Objective: (1) To assess the color of the maxillofacial silicone before curing using a mobile phone colorimeter application. (2) To assess the color of the maxillofacial silicone after curing using a mobile phone colorimeter application. (3) To measure the degree of change in terms of HSV (Hue, Saturation, Value) of the color of the maxillofacial silicone before and after curing using a mobile phone colorimeter application. Materials and Methods: 25 samples were fabricated for the study using M511, maxillofacial silicone The base and catalyst was mixed. The manipulated color was evaluated with the mobile phone colorimeter application in terms of Hue, saturation and value before and after curing using a mobile phone colorimeter application. Statistical analysis was done by using descriptive and inferential statistics using student’s paired t test and software used in the analysis was SPSS 22.0 version and p<0.05 is considered as level of significance. Results: The mean of value for samples before curing is 71.44 and after curing is 73.60. Mean differences is 2.16±3.11, with p value 0.002 S, which is statistically significant. Conclusion: (1) There was significant color change that occurred during polymerization of the silicone. It was pronounced when the pigment loading in the mix was higher. (2) The measures of Hue and chroma for the Samples did not show statistically significant changes. (3) The measures of value for the Samples showed statistically significant changes. (4) The mean differences for the value was 2-3%.

Keywords: Colorimetry, dentistry, silicone


  Oral 081 Top



  Ethical Issues in Diagnostic Delay of Oral Cancer by Health Care Professionals Top


Vidya Lohe, Ravindra Kadu

Sharad Pawar Dental College, Wardha, Maharashtra, India

Background: Greatest burden of oral cancer falls upon people presenting in late stage but ethical issues in Diagnostic delay of Oral Cancer by health care professionals has not been explored extensively. For better treatment outcomes exploring the ethical issues in Diagnostic delay of Oral Cancer by health care professionals is fundamental. Objective: To explore ethical issues in Diagnostic delay of Oral Cancer by health care professionals. Methodology: Thorough case history of 120 histopathologically confirmed Oral Cancer (Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma) patients was taken. Patients delay in presentation of Oral Cancer to health care professionals was calculated by measuring the time between the onset of the first symptoms of Oral Cancer and the first consultation with primary health care provider. Results: Out of 120 Oral Cancer patients, 04 (3.33%) patients reported in stage II, 31 (25.83%) in stage III and 85 (70.83%) in stage IV. Fourteen (11.66%) patients reported within 3 months of the onset of the first symptoms, 72 (60.00%) between 3-6 months, 20 (16.66%) reported between 6-9 months and 14 (11.66%) reported between 9-12 months of the onset of the first symptoms. Analysis of various health care providers responsible for professional / referral delay revealed that, in 71 (59.16%) cases there was professional / referral delay. Out of 71 (59.16%) cases, in 32 (46.37%) cases, primary health care professionals, in 27 (38.02%) cases private practitioners, in 05(7.24%) cases, traditional healers in 03 (04.34%) cases dentists, in 03 (04.34%) cases, homeopathic doctors and in 01 (01.44%) case dermatologist were responsible for referral delay. Conclusion: Health care professionals have diagnostic dilemma about early cancerous lesions, they might not consider oral cancer in differential diagnosis, and frequently prescribe analgesics or antibiotics to get symptomatic relief. Moreover, patients may not respond to the treatment and therefore lost to follow-up. This may raise the ethical issues in patients presenting at the advanced stage of tumor at the time of diagnosis. Training the Health care professionals on how to diagnose Oral Cancers at the early stage and emphasizing on the appropriate methods of examination of oral cavity may contribute to the early diagnosis and thereby help in improving the prognosis and quality of life of patients and may resolve the ethical issues to some extent. Moreover, the education and counselling of patient to improve the awareness about oral cancer and training patients how to perform self-oral examination is vital.

Keywords: Dentistry, diagnostics, ethics


  Oral 082 Top



  The Lecture Mastery of Junior College Teachers as Perceived by the Students Top


Victor Rosangzuala, Pooja R. Kasturkar

Department of Mental Health Nursing, Smt. Radhikabai Meghe Memorial College of Nursing, Datta Meghe Institute of Medical Science (Deemed to be University), Sawangi (Meghe), Wardha, Maharashtra, India

Background: Mastery of the subject matter by the teacher helps them to impart knowledge effectively and confidently. It is through the mastery of subject matter that the teachers are able to impart the right skills of communication, collaboration, critical thinking and creativity that are based on the three learning domains of cognitive, affective and psychomotor. Aim and Objective: (1) To assess the lecture mastery of junior college teachers as perceived by the students. (2) To associate the lecture mastery with demographic variables of participants. Materials and Methods: The study was non experimental study conducted among 150 students of selected junior colleges in Wardha. Teacher effectiveness rating scale was used to find out the perception of students which consist of 20 items which are all positive questions. The scale consists of ratings from 1-5 score from the lowest to highest, the percentage lecture mastery score according to the scale is given as 0-20 which is the lowest score and 81-100 as the highest percentage score. Results: the junior college students gave ratings to the lecture mastery of their teachers as Poor ranging from (0-20) as 0.66%, Average ranging from (21-40) which is 0%, Good ranging from (41-60) which is 0%, Very Good ranging from (61-80) which is 34% and excellent ranging from (65.33%). The students give a high excellent score ratings of their teachers. Conclusion: The teachers are having more lecture mastery skill in junior college students as rated by the junior college students.

Keywords: Communication, education, mastery


  Oral 083 Top



  To Assess the Effectiveness of Planned Teaching on Knowledge Regarding Leucorrhoea among Women Top


Amruta V. Taksande, Vaishali Taksande

Smt. Radhikabai Meghe Memorial College of Nursing, Datta Meghe Institute of Medical Sciences, Wardha, Maharashtra, India

Background: Leucorrhoea is the clinical evidence of infection and can be treated satisfactorily whenever diagnosed. Occurrence of cervical cancer associated with discharge /leucorrhoea can be easily prevented if detected early. Majority of patients attending hospital present with varying degrees of vaginal discharge and cytological monitoring of these subjects is mandatory to know any cellular changes in the cervical epithelium as well as the presence of any sexually transmitted diseases (STD’s) in the genital tract. Objective: (1) To assess the knowledge regarding leucorrhoea among women. (2) To assess the effectiveness of planned teaching on knowledge regarding Leucorrhoea among women. (3) To associate the knowledge regarding Leucorrhoea among women with their selected demographic variables. Materials and Methods: Study Design: Quasi experimental one group pre test and post test design This study was based on Quantitativeevaluatory research approach. The sample was women from selected rural area. Population: women of age from 20-40 years. Setting of the study: Selected rural area. Samples Size: 60.Material: Structured questionnaire having 15MCQs and planned teaching. The correct answer got score 1 and wrong answer got 0 scores. Results: In the study, 38(63.3%) subjects belongs to the age group of 17-24 years, 9 (15%) belongs to the age group of 25-32 years, 13(21.6%) belongs to the age group of 33-40 years, 38 (63.3%) most of the subject belongs to the age group of 17-24 years. Most of the subjects, 34 (56.6%) had primary education, 8(13.3%) had secondary education, 4 (6.6%) is higher secondary and 14 (23.3%) is graduate/post graduated. Most of the subjects, 46 (76.6%) were unemployed. 14 (23.3%) were employed. Most of the subjects, 38 (63.3%) belongs to joint family, 22 (36.6%) were belongs to nuclear family. Most of the subjects, 34 (56.6%) were having socio-economic status 6000-10000, 12 (20%) were having 10001-15000 and 14 (23.3%) were having above 16000. Most of the subjects, 47 (78.3%) had suffered from Leucorrhoea previously, 13 (21.6%) were not suffered from Leucorrhoea previously. 5 (8.3%) attended health education program related to Leucorrhoea, most of them 55(91.6%) did not attend health education program related to Leucorrhoea. Conclusion: The findings reveal that there was no significant association between post test knowledge and any demographic variables like age, education, occupation, family type, socio-economic status, subjects suffered from Leucorrhoea and attended education program. There was significant increase in the knowledge scores of the study participants after giving planned teaching.

Keywords: Education, female, leucorrhoea


  Oral 084 Top



  Assess The Effectiveness of Planned Teaching Knowledge on Regarding Early Warning Signs and Its Management of Alzheimer’s Disease among Caregiver of Elderly Client Top


Naina Sukhadeve

SRMMCON, Sawangi (Meghe), Wardha, Maharashtra, India

Background: In India, more than 4 million people have some form of Alzheimer’s Worldwide, at least 44 million people are living with Alzheimer’s making the disease a global health crisis that must be addressed. A diagnosis of Alzheimer’s is life changing for the person with the disease, as well as their family and friends. People above the age of 60 years constitute about 5% of patients seen in tertiary care settings. High prevalence of psychiatric morbidity was reported among community resident older people. We need to develop community-based interventions for management of common conditions like Alzheimer’s in late life. Objective: (1) To assess the existing knowledge on early warning signs and its management of Alzheimer’s disease among caregivers of elderly clients. (2) To evaluate the effectiveness of planned teaching on knowledge on early warning signs and its management of Alzheimer’s disease among caregivers of elderly client. (3) To associate the knowledge scores with selected demographic variables. Materials and Methods: The research approach in this study is descriptive analytic approach. Study Design: one group pre testpost test design. Setting of the Study: This study was conducted in community area of sawangi. Sample: general population. Sampling technique: Samples will be selected by Non-probability convenience sampling technique. Sample size: Sample size for this study is 50. Tool: Structured knowledge questionnaire including demographic variables and planned teaching was used for the study. Results: The result of this study shows that the knowledge score is 24 (48 %) of them had good level of knowledge and 21 (42%) had very good level of knowledge score and 5 (10%) had excellent level of knowledge respectively. To find the effectiveness of planned teaching ‘t’ test was applied and value was calculated, post test score was significantly higher at 0.05 level than that of pretest score. Conclusion: Studies shows that post test score was significantly higher at 0.05 level than that of pretest score. Thus it was concluded that planned teaching on knowledge regarding early warning signs and its management of Alzheimer disease among care giver of elderly client

Keywords: Alzheimer’s, education, geriatrics


  Oral 085 Top



  To Assess the Knowledge Regarding Glaucoma among General Population Top


Archana Dhengare

SRMMCON, Sawangi (M), Wardha, Maharashtra, India

Background: The study aims to evaluate the level of knowledge of glaucoma and their possible determinants in a group of people diagnosed with glaucoma and in a population-based group without glaucoma. Studies done on the prevalence of glaucoma have reported a high proportion of undiagnosed patients. Aim and Objective: (1) To assess the knowledge regarding glaucoma among the general population. (2) To find an association between the level of knowledge with selected socio-demographic variables. Materials and Methods: Research design: Descriptive research design. Settings of the study: The study will be conducted in the general population. Sample size: 100 general populations. Sampling Technique: Non-probability convenience sampling. Tool: The tool for the present study is a self-administered knowledge questionnaire which consists of two sections. A. Socio-demographic. B- Structured question regarding known of glaucoma. Results: The study findings show 1 (1%) had a poor level of knowledge, 27 (27%) were having an average level of knowledge. 57 (57%) were having a good level of knowledge, 15 (15%) were having very good knowledge, score and 0(0%) were having an excellent level of knowledge. The minimum score was 3 and the maximum score was 12 the mean score for the test was 7.61 ±1.814 and mean percentage of knowledge was 50.73. Conclusion: It is to conclude that knowledge is which throws light on the need for arrangement of special classes for the general population and also for assessing the general population periodically. The general population must upgrade their knowledge as they are the future to the preventing and promoting the health.

Keywords: Glaucoma, health, knowledge


  Oral 086 Top



  To Assess the Effectiveness of Self Instructional Module on Knowledge Regarding First Aid Management of Selected Pediatric Emergencies at Home among Mothers of Under Five Children Top


Lalrinfela Ralte, Bibin Kurian

Department of Child Health Nursing, Smt. Radhikabai Meghe Memorial College of Nursing, Datta Meghe Institute of Medical Sciences (Deemed to be University), Sawangi (Meghe), Wardha, Maharashtra, India

Objectives: (1) To assess the existing knowledge regarding first aid management of selected Pediatric emergencies at home among mothers of under five children. (2) To assess the effectiveness of self instructional module on knowledge regarding first aid management of selected Pediatric emergencies at home. (3) To associate the knowledge score with selected demographic variables. Materials and Methods: The study was an interventional analytic approach conducted among 60 mothers fromselected urban area in Wardha. Self Instructional Module were used to collect the data. Results: Pre test knowledge regarding first aid management of selected Pediatrics emergencies among mothers of under five children. 9(15%) of them had poor level of knowledge score, 38(63.33%) of them had average level of knowledge score, 13(21.67%) of them had good level of knowledge score and none of them had very good level of knowledge score. The minimum score was 4 and maximum score was 17, the mean score was 9.83 ± 3.216 with a mean percentage value of 57.82%. Assessment of post test knowledge regarding first aid management of selected Pediatrics emergencies among mothers of under five children. None of them had poor and average knowledge level in post test. 16(26.66%) of them had good level of knowledge score, 44(73.33%) of them had very good level of knowledge score. The minimum score in post test was 15 and maximum score was 25.The mean score was 20.37 ± 2.755 with a mean percentage score of 81.48. Conclusion: It was concluded that self instructional module on first aid management of selected Pediatrics emergencies at home among mothers of under five children was found effective and there were no association of knowledge with any of the demographic variables.

Keywords: Education, emergency, pediatrics


  Oral 087 Top



  To Assess the Effectiveness of Self Instructional Module on Knowledge Regarding Selected Learning Disabilities in Primary School Children among Primary School Teachers Top


Lalzampuii, Darshana Kumari

Department of Child Health Nursing, Smt. Radhikabai Meghe Memorial College of Nursing, Datta Meghe Institute of Medical Sciences (Deemed to be University), Sawangi (Meghe), Wardha, Maharashtra, India

Background: Learning disabilities can be managed effectively if the parents and teachers identify the problem at the earliest. Though the child may have normal intelligence level they are struggling hard to keep up with other normal children. Unfortunately, there are children who are still remaining unidentified and are regarded as failures or mentally challenged by the school authority as well as by the family members. Objectives: (1) To assess the existing knowledge regarding selected learning disabilities in primary school children among primary school teachers. (2) To assess the effectiveness of Self Instructional Module (SIM) on knowledge regarding selected learning disabilities in primary school children among primary school teachers. (3) To associate the knowledge scores with a selected demographic variables. Materials and Methods: The Research Approach of this study is an interventional analytical approach. Research Design: One group pre-test post-test research design is used. Setting: The setting of the study was selected primary schools in Wardha. Population: In this study the population were primary school teachers. Sampling Technique: A Non-Probability purposive sampling technique is used to select the sample. Sample size: 60 samples of primary school teachers from 5 primary schools were selected for the study. The inclusion criteria were: (1) Primary school teachers who are working in selected primary schools. (2) Primary school teachers who are present at the time of data collection. The exclusion criteria were: (1) Primary school teachers who have already attended the programme on the same topic. (2) Primary school teachers who are not willing to participate in the study. Tools: A structured self instructional module and structured questionnaire was used for the study. Results: Knowledge regarding selected learning disabilities in primary school children among primary school teachers was that 17 (28.3%) had good knowledge score, 38 (63.3%)of them had average level of knowledge score, 5 (8.3%) of them had poor knowledge score. None of them had excellent level of knowledge score. The minimum score was 3 and the maximum score was 15, the mean score was 9.13±2.514 with a mean percentage score of 45.65%. Assessment of post test knowledge score was 52 (86.6%) have excellent knowledge score and 8 (13.3%) have good level of knowledge score and none of them had poor and average level of knowledge score. The minimum score was 13 and the maximum score was 20, the mean score was 17.62± 1.795 with a mean percentage score of 88.1%. Mean value of pre test was 9.13 and post test was 17.62 and standard deviation values of pre test was 2.514 and post test was 1.795. The calculated t-value was 23.063 and tabulated p-value was 0.000. Hence, it is statistically interpreted that the self instructional module on knowledge regarding selected learning disabilities in primary school children among primary school teachers was effective. Conclusion: As self instructional module was found to be effective in this study, it was also necessary to carry out a self structured study among parents of learning disability children to enhance their knowledge and give awareness so as to manage and reduce learning disabilities among children.

Keywords: Disability, education, pediatrics


  Oral 088 Top



  To Assess the Effectiveness of Planned Teaching on Knowledge Regarding Prevention of Haemorrhoids among General Population Top


Mercy B. Joseph, Savita Pohekar

Department of Child Health Nursing, Smt. Radhikabai Meghe Memorial College of Nursing, Datta Meghe Institute of Medical Sciences (Deemed to be University), Sawangi (Meghe), Wardha, Maharashtra, India

Background: The actual cause of haemorrhoids remains unknown. But it is proposed to be caused by temperament, body habits, customs, passions, sedentary life, tight-laced clothes, and climate. Other causes that have been attributed to this condition are genetic predisposition, increased intra-abdominal pressure from many causes, including prolonged forceful defecation, obstruction of venous outflow secondary to pregnancy, and constipated stool in the rectal ampulla. Increased body mass index is also considered to be one of the contributing factors. Objectives: (1) To assess the knowledge regarding prevention of haemorrhoids. (2) To assess the effectiveness of planned teaching on knowledge regarding prevention of haemorrhoids. (3) To associate the findings with demographic variables. Materials and Methods: The research approach in this study is Descriptive Analytical approach. Research design: One group pre-test- post-test research design. Setting of the study: The setting of the study was selected in Sawangi of Wardha district. Population: In this study the population comprised of General population in Wardha. Sample: The sample for the present study comprised of general population in selected areas of Wardha city. Sample size: The sample size selected for this study was 60. Sampling technique: Non-probability convenient sampling technique. Tool for data collection: The structured questionnaire was used in Marathi along with demographic data sheet after taking their written consent. Plan for data analysis: The data was analyzed by using descriptive and inferential statistics. Results: In pretest 85% have poor knowledge about hemorrhoids and 15% have good knowledge. In post test 3.3% people scored good, 41.7% scored very good and 55% gained excellent knowledge regarding prevention of hemorrhoids. There was a significant difference between pretest and post test knowledge scores interpreting planned teaching on knowledge regarding prevention of haemorrhoids. Mean value of pretest is 3.87 and post test is 15.55 and a standard deviation value of pretest was 1.420 and post test was 2.715. The ‘F’ value was calculated 1.109 at 5% level of significance with df 59. Also the calculated ‘p’ value is 0.353 which was more than acceptable level of significance i.e. >0.05. Hence it is interpreted that age in years of population is not associated with their knowledge scores. The‘t’ value was calculated -.0.141 at 5% level significance with df 58. Also calculated ‘p’= 0.356 which was more than accepted level of significance i.e. ‘p’>0.05. Hence it was interpreted that the gender of subjects was not significantly associated with their knowledge scores. The ‘F’ value was calculated 2.134 at 5% level of significance with df 59. Also calculated ‘p’ value = 0.106 which was more than the acceptable level of significance i.e. ‘p’ >0.05. Hence it was interpreted that education was not associated with their knowledge scores. The ‘F’ value was calculated 0.300 at 5% level of significance with df 59. Also calculated ‘p’ value = 0.825 which was more than the acceptable level of significance i.e. ‘p’ >0.05. Hence it was interpreted that occupation was not associated with their knowledge scores. The ‘F’ value was calculated 1.119 at 5% level of significance with df 59. Also calculated ‘p’ value = 0.334 which was more than the acceptable level of significance i.e. ‘p’ >0.05. Hence it was interpreted that diet pattern was not associated with their knowledge scores. Conclusion: The aim of the study was to assess the effectiveness of planned teaching on knowledge regarding prevention of haemorrhoids, with the help of this study awareness can be spread regarding haemorrhoids and its prevention strategies. People will be aware regarding the cause of haemorrhoids and they can take measures to prevent it.

Keywords: Education, haemorrhoids, health


  Oral 089 Top



  Assess the Knowledge Regarding Risk Factors of Gastritis among 2nd Year Engineering Students Top


Shweta M. Fating

SRMMCON, Sawangi (M), Wardha, Maharashtra, India

Background: Gastritis is the one of the most common gastro intestinal disorder. It is the inflammation of the gastric mucosa. The statistical rate showing about 50% of the world population is suffering with gastritis i.e. 2.7 million people1. Adolescents are a particular nutritional risk because as they away from home to pursue their higher education. The peer group influences the unhealthy life styles and unhealthy dietary management tend to put the category at most risk. To avoid the being the part of this statistics the best solution is the appropriate preventive measures goes hand in hand with properly planned management such as life style modification, dietary management as well as medical management. Aim and Objective: (1) To assess the knowledge regarding risk factor of gastritis among second year engineering student in selected collages. (2) To associate the knowledge regarding gastritis scores with selected demographic variables (age, gender, marital status, type of family, place of stay, parent’s education). Research Design: The exploratory descriptive study. Setting of the Study: Study will be conducted in the Engineering collage area at sawangi (meghe) Wardha district. Sample: 2nd year Engineering students. Sampling technique: Purposive Sampling. Sample Size: 100 Tool: A structured questionnaire including Socio demographic variables and Knowledge regarding risk factors of gastritis. Results: The result of this the study findings show 0 (0%) of second year engineering students were having poor level of knowledge score, 25 (18%) of second year engineering students were having average level of knowledge sc1ore, 70 (65%) of second year engineering students were having good level of knowledge score, 20 (17%) of second year engineering students were having very good level of knowledge score, 0 (0%) of second year engineering students were having very excellent of knowledge score. Mean knowledge score was 15.50±3.17 and mean percentage of knowledge score was 51.66±10.56. It shows that overall knowledge was good, where there is age, dietary pattern, place of stay, specific heath risk behavior were found to be significantly association between knowledge score with selected demographic variables. And genders were found to be no significantly association between knowledge score with selected demographic variables. Conclusion: It is to conclude that the knowledge of risk factors are which throws light on need for arrangement of special classes for the students and also need for assessing the students periodically. The students must upgrade their knowledge as they are the future to the preventing and promoting the health.

Keywords: Education, gastritis, stress


  Oral 090 Top



  To Assess the Risk Factots of Cervical Cancer among Women Top


Priya R. Kamdi

Department of Obstetric and Gynecology, Smt. Radhikabai Meghe Memorial College of Nursing, Sawangi (Meghe), Wardha, Maharashtra, India

Background: Cervical cancer is the commonest cancer affecting reproductive organ and leading cause of death among women]. It is one of the registered Cancers with increasing incidence trends in the US: 1999- 2008.1 Women in developing nations are at a 35% greater lifetime risk of developing cervical cancer than women in high-income countries. Although cervical cancer is most common in women older than 50 years, in developing nations, it is becoming increasing prevalent among women during their reproductive age 15-49 years. Aim and Objective: (1) To assess the risk factors of cervical cancer among women in rural area of Wardha. (2) To associate the risk factors of cancer of cervix among women with their selected demographic variables. Materials and Methods: Research Design: Descriptive survey design Setting of the Study: Study will be conducted in the women in rural area of wardha. Sample: women in rural area of wardha. Above 40 years old. Sampling Technique: Samples will be collected by non-probability convenient sampling technique. Sample Size: The sample size for this study is 100. Tool: The assessment will be consisting of Section A Socio demographic variables and Section B-check list regarding risk factors of cervical cancer. Results: Shows that in pretest 6(10%) of subjects are having poor level of knowledge score, 48(80%) were having average level of knowledge score, 6(10%) were having good knowledge regarding fibroid uterus. And the minimum score is 2, maximum score is 11, mean score is 6.63±1.636 and mean percentage is 41.4375%. Shows no association of risk factors of cervical cancer. There was no significant association risk factors of cervical cancer with any demographic variables like age, religion, education, occupation, marital status, age of marriage. Conclusion: Analysis of data shows that the most of the people were 20-25 years of age and majority of gender women is more and in religion of women is Muslim were occupation is more and most of the women are working most of married women. Age of marriage is 0-5 years.

Keywords: Cancer, cervix, females


  Oral 091 Top



  To Assess the Knowledge Regarding Biopsychosocial Wellbeing and Family Support among Menopausal Women Top


Snehal Dhobe

SRMMCON, Sawangi (M), Wardha, Maharashtra, India

Menopause is the time in a women’s life when the function of ovaries ceases. The ovary or female gonad, is one of a pair of reproductive gland in women. The process of menopause does not occur overnight, but rather is gradual process. This so called perimenopausal transition period is a different experience for each women. The average age of menopause is onset of is 51 years old. There is no single method to predict when a women will experience menopause. To assess the knowledge regarding biopsychosocial wellbeing and family support among menopausal womem. Objectives: Assess the knowledge regarding biopsychosocial wellbeing among menopausal women. Assess the knowledge regarding family support among menopausal women. To associate between the biopsychosocial and family support among menopausal women with selected demographic variables. Assumptions: Menopausal women may have some knowledge regarding biopsychosocial wellbeing and family support. Section 1: Distribution of menopausal women with regards to demographic variables. This section deals with percentage wise distribution of menopausal women with regards to their demographic characteristics. A convenient sample of 100 subjects was drawn from the study population, who were from selected areas. The data obtained to describe the sample characteristics including age, education and occupation respectively. According to age of menopausal women distribution is 7% of the menopausal women were in the age group of 40-42 years, 13% were in the age group of 43-45 years, 17% were in the age group of 46-48 years, 20% in the age group of 49-51 years and 43% were in the age group of 52-54 years. According to the education the distribution is as 4% of the menopausal women were illiterate, 18% of them were educated upto primary standard, 46% were upto secondary standard, 21% of them were graduates and 11% of them were postgraduates. According to the occupation the distribution is as 59% of the menopausal women were housewife, 28% of them were government servant, 11% of them had their own business and only 2% of them were labourer. This section deals with the assessment of level of knowledge regarding bio-psychosocial wellbeing and family support among menopausal women The level of knowledge score is divided under following heading of poor, average, good and excellent. The findings shows that 1% of the menopausal women had poor level of knowledge score, 23% had average level of knowledge score, 51% had good and 25% had excellent level of knowledge score. Minimum knowledge score was 4 and maximum knowledge score was 15.Mean knowledge score was 10.56 ± 2.55 and mean percentage of knowledge score was 66 ± 15.99. Section III: This major findings shows the association of knowledge score with age in years of menopausal women regarding bio-psychosocial well being and family support. The tabulated ‘F’ values was 2.46(df=4,95) which is much higher than the calculated ‘F’ i.e. 1.50 at 5% level of significance. Also the calculated ‘p’=0.20 which was much higher than the acceptable level of significance i.e. ‘p’=0.05. Hence it is interpreted that age in years of menopausal women is statistically not associated with their knowledge score. This findings shows the association of knowledge score with educational level of menopausal women regarding bio-psychosocial wellbeing and family support. The tabulated ‘F’ values was 2.46(df=4, 95) which is less than the calculated ‘F’ i.e. 2.56 at 5% level of significance. Also the calculated ‘p’=0.043 which was less than the acceptable level of significance i.e. ‘p’=0.05. Hence it is interpreted that educational level of menopausal women is statistically associated with their knowledge score. The fidings shows the association of knowledge score with occupation of menopausal women regarding bio-psychosocial wellbeing and family support. The tabulated ‘F’ values was 2.70(df=3, 96) which is much higher than the calculated ‘F’ i.e. 2.67 at 5% level of significance. Also the calculated ‘p’=0.052 which was much higher than the acceptable level of significance i.e. ‘p’=0.05. Hence it is interpreted that occupation of menopausal women is statistically not associated with their knowledge score.

Keywords: Biopsychosocial, family, menopause


  Oral 092 Top



  To Assess the Effectiveness of Self Instructional Module on Knowledge Regarding Hemophilia in Children among School Teachers Top


Laltanpuii, Archana Maurya

SRMMCON, Sawangi (M), Wardha, Maharashtra, India

Objectives: (1) To assess the existing knowledge regarding Hemophilia among teachers in school. (2) To evaluate the effectiveness of Self Instructional Module (SIM) regarding Hemophilia among teachers in school. (3) To associate knowledge score with selected demographic variables. Materials and Methods: The study was an evaluative approach conducted among 60 teachers from selected schools in Wardha. Structured knowledge questionnaire were used to collect the data. Results: Pre test knowledge regarding hemophilia in children among school teachers. 11 (18.3%) of them had poor level of knowledge score, 43 (71.67%) of them had average level of knowledge score, 4 (6.67%) of them had good level of knowledge score, 2 (3.3%) of them had very good level of knowledge score and none of them had excellent level of knowledge score. The minimum score was 0 and maximum score was 22, the mean score was 8.52 ± 4.280with a mean percentage value of 28.4%. Assessment of post test knowledge regarding hemophilia in children among school teachers. 2 (3.3%) of them had average level of knowledge score, 1 (1.6%) of them had good level of knowledge score, 22 (36.67%) of them had very good level of knowledge score and 35 (58.3%) of them had excellent level of knowledge score. Conclusion: Analysis of data showed that there was significant difference between pre test and post test knowledge scores. Hence it is concluded that the Self Instructional Module significantly brought improvement in the knowledge regarding hemophilia in children among school teachers.

Keywords: Education, hemophilia, pediatrics


  Oral 093 Top



  A Study to Assess Complementary Feeding Practices and Nutritional Status of Infants Top


Gunjan Morade, Shalini Lokhande

SRMMCON, Sawangi (M), Wardha, Maharashtra, India

Background: The complementary feeding comprises a period in the life of the infant that starts with the introduction of foods other than breast milk. Malnutrition in infant has been attributed to inappropriate complementary feeding practices and it underlies the one third of child-mortality. Thus, addressing the influence of complementary feeding practice of mother on nutritional status of children may be an important approach towards reducing burden of child malnutrition. Objectives: (1) To assess complementary feeding practices of mother in rural area. (2) To assess nutritional status of infants. Materials and Methods: 60 pairs of mothers and infants samples were selected from rural area of wardha district by non-probability purposive sampling technique. In this study descriptive research design was used. The WHO infant and young child feeding questionnaire was used to assess the practice of mother regarding complementary feeding and physical parameters are assessed. Results: All 60 infants (age 6 to 12 months) were still receiving breast feeding. 76.7% mothers started complementary feeding at the age of 6 month. 65% mothers prepares their child’s food separately. 90% mothers feed their infant with the use of spoon and katori. The diet of 81.7% infants met minimum dietary diversity and the diet of 88.3% met the minimum meal frequency. All 60 mothers (100%) were practicing hand washing with soap before feeding their child. Conclusion: complementary feeding practices among mother was found good so that no any infant was underweight, wasted and stunted.

Keywords: Feeding, infants, nutrition


  Oral 094 Top



  A Comparative Study on Maternal and Foetal Outcome of Anaema and Non Anaemic Pregnant Mothers Top


Chaitali Yengade

SRMMCON, DMIMS (DU), Sawangi (M), Wardha, Maharashtra, India

Background: Anemia is a serious public health problem that still affects hundreds of people around the world and reports new cases everyday. Promotion of maternal and child health has been one of the most important objectives of family welfare programmers. Investigator from her personal experience during community posting identified that even though iron and folic acid tablets are distributed to antenatal mothers, most of the mothers refused to take those tablets as they believe their new born become dark. Anaemia is largely preventable. Timely recognition and correction during pregnancy helps to improve the pregnancy outcome and thereby reducing the incidence of unfavorable maternal and foetal outcome in the community to have a healthy baby from a healthy mother and a healthy nation. Aim and Objective: (1) Assess the maternal and foetal outcomes of anaemic pregnant mothers with anaemia using an observation checklist. (2) Assess the maternal and foetal outcome of non anaemic pregnant mothers without anaemia using an observation checklist. (3) Compare the maternal and foetal outcome of anaemic and Non anaemic pregnant mothers. Materials and Methods: Comparative descriptive survey design was used. In this study, 17 anaemic and 17 not anaemic pregnant mothers and their newborn admitted to the selected maternity hospital was the sample. Non probability purposive sampling technique was used. Results: There was statistically significant difference for occupation of pregnant women days of menstruation and amount of flow. In maternal outcome, preterm delivery,mode of delivery and PPH among Anaemic pregnant mothers and Non anaemic pregnant mothers was statistically significant. In fetal outcome, birth weight, APGAR score, shifting of baby and stay in NICU were statistically significant. Conclusion: Our findings reveal that pregnancy related complications like preterm labor, low birth weight babies and low APGAR scores at 1 minute were more in pregnant women This suggests that the outcome of pregnancy for the mother and the baby is influenced by the iron reserves of the woman prior to conception. Hence, anemia control measures should start pre-conceptionally so that women enter the state of pregnancy with adequate iron reserve.

Keywords: Anemia, outcome, pregnancy


  Oral 095 Top



  Effectiveness of Lecture Cum Demonstration on Knowledge Regarding First Aid in Selected Minor Injuries among the ASHA Workers Top


Pallawi Wankhede

SRMMCON, Sawangi (M), Wardha, Maharashtra, India

Background: First aid is the providing of first and early care for an illness or injury, by a non-expert but trained person, till medical treatment can be accessed. Immediate first aid when provided to patients who require emergency care makes a huge difference to the outcome1It is newer concept that Government of India training ASHAs who are the major link between the rural people and health services. ASHA is a resident woman of the village with formal education at least up to the 8th standard. They provide service at the point of care, often in the patient’s home and at the place of emergencies in the community. Objective: (1) To assess the pretest knowledge of ASHA workers regarding first aid of selected minor injuries like, wound dressing, epistaxis, dog biting. (2) To assess the effectiveness of lecture cum demonstration on knowledge regarding first aid among the ASHA workers on selected minor injuries. (3) To associate the post test knowledge of ASHA workers regarding first aid of selected minor injuries with demographic variables. Materials and Methodology: Experimental Pretest post test design was used sample were ASHA workers from the rural areas of Wardha district. 30 samples were selected by non probability convenience method and structured questionnaires were used for data collection. Results: The levels of knowledge were seen into 4 categories, poor, average, good and excellent of ASHA workers, frequency and percentage wise distribution of ASHA workers according to post test level of knowledge regarding first aid management of minor injuries. Mean knowledge score at post test was 36.93±1.507and mean percentage knowledge score was 50%. Conclusion: Study found that the middle most 50% post-test knowledge scores were higher than the pre-test knowledge score indicating the significant improvement in the knowledge (z=6.755, p=0.001) on first aid and improvement in skills in first aid for open wounds, closed fracture of the arm, snake bite, dog bite and bee sting (z= 6.771, 6.786, 6.801, 6.834, 6.818 respectively at p=0.001) after teaching through lecture cum demonstration. Lecture cum demonstration on first aid measures was effective in enhancing the knowledge and skills of ASHA.

Keywords: ASHA, education, injury


  Oral 096 Top



  To Assesss Factors Associated with Age at Menarche among Teenage Girls in Selected School, Wardha Top


Aparna Kawale, Shalini Moon

SRMMCON, Sawangi (M), Wardha, Maharashtra, India

Background: A great deal of research on early puberty has been conducted in girls, because puberty is easily identified by menarche. In northern Europe and the United States, the mean age at menarche has decreased by about 3 years over the last century. Similarly, a 2008 study in India reported that age at menarche had declined by approximately 7 months per decade since 1960. Apart from genetic influences, the global trend of an earlier age at menarche is considered a consequence of improved nutrition, reduced infection rates, exposure to chemical substances, and environmental factors. Objective: (1) To assess the factors associate with age of Menarche. (2) To associated the factors associated with age at Menarche among Teenage Girls with their selected demographic veriables. Materials and Methods: Research Approach - Quantitative research approach. Research Design: Descriptive Survey design. Setting of The Study: The study conducted at Dr. Ambedkar school Wardha. Population: Teenage Girls. Sampling Technique: purposive sampling. Sample Size: 56. Results: The data obtained to describe the sample characteristics including age, residence before menarche, type of school, type of family, religion, monthly family income, socio-economic status, household size, BMI category, type of diet and age at menarche respectively. While dealing section A, distribution of study subjects demographic variables, we can find distribution of teenage girls according to their age in years shows that each 50% of the teenage girls were belonging to the age group of 11-14 and 15-18 years respectively. area of residence. 16.10% of the teenage girls were from rural areas and 83.90% from urban areas. type of school All (100%) of the teenage girls were from government schools. type of family. 71.40% of the teenagers girls were from nuclear families, 25% of them were from joint and 3.60% of them were from extended families. religion17.90% of the teenage girls were hindus and 82.10% of them were belonging to other religion. monthly family income (Rs). 64.30% of the teenage girls had monthly family income of 5000-10000 Rs, 19.60% had between 10001-15000 Rs, 5.40% had between 15001-20000 Rs and 10.70% of them had more than 20000 Rs. socio-economic status. 1.80% of the teenage girls had low socio-economic status, 89.30% of them were from middle and 8.90% of them were from higher socio-economic status. size of the family. 25% of the teenagers girls had family size of 1 to 3,57.10% of them had 4 to 6, 14.30% of them had 7 to 9 and 3.60% of them had more than 10. BMI category. 53.60% of the teenagers were undernourished, 42.90% of them were normal and 3.60% of them were overweight. type of diet. 8.90% of the teenagers girls were vegetarian, 1.80% of them were non-vegetarian and 89.30% of them were consuming mixed type of diet. age at menarche. 1.80% of the teenage girls were having age of menarche 7-9 years, 35.70% had between 10-12 years, 58.90% had between 13-15 years and 3.60% of them had between 16-18 years respectively. While assessing the factor associated with age at menarche among teenage girls in section B, 14.3% of the teenage girls consume milk daily, 12.5% consumes weekly, 23.2% consumes monthly and 50% of them consume never. 1.8% of the teenage girls take soft drink daily, 5.4% weekly, 60.7% rarely and 32.1% of them never take soft drink. 42.9% of the teenage girls consume eggs weekly, 39.3% consumes monthly and 17.9% of them never consumers eggs. 7.1% of the teenage girls consume junk food daily, 42.9% consumes weekly, 41.1% consumes monthly and 8.9% of them never consumes junk food. 35.7% of teenage girls were physically active in sports, 8.9% were in indore game, 23.2% in cooking and 32.1% of the teenage girls were physically active in other activities. 12.5% of the teenage girls sleeps less than 6 hours, 60.7% sleeps 7-8 hours, 12.5% sleeps 9-10 hours and 14.3% of them sleeps more than 10 hours. 1.8% of the teenage girls daily faces in family debetes and violence, 5.4% monthly, 55.4% faces rarely and 37.5% of the teenager girls never faces in family debetes and violence. 3.6% of the teenage girls had 8-10 years of menarche, 35.7% had 11-13 years, 50% had 14-16 years and 10.7% of them had more than 16 years of age of menarche. 5.4% of the mothers of teenage girls had only one parity, 62.5% had two parity, 30.4% of them had 3-4 parity and 1.8% of them had more than 4 parity. 21.4% of the mothers of teenage girls had weight of their babies less than 2 kg, each 26.8% of them had 2.1l?-2.5 kg and 2.6-3 kg and 25% of them had more than 3 kg respectively. BMI category 53.60% of the teenagers were undernourished, 42.90% of them were normal and 3.60% of them were overweight. The tabulated ‘F’ values was 3.15(df=2.53) which is much less than the calculated ‘F’ i.e. 3.52 at 5% level of significance. Also the calculated ‘p’=0.040 which was much less than the acceptable level of significance i.e. ‘p’= 0.05. Hence it is interpreted that BMI category of teenage girls is statistically associated with their level of factors associated with age at menarche. Conclusion: In this study the finding of the study shows that overall factors, where there is no significant association between factors. In demographic variables, where there is significant association between demographic variable. the association of level of factors associated with household size before menarche with BMI category of teenage girls.

Keywords: Health, menarche, teenage


  Oral 097 Top



  A Study to Assess the Knowledge Regarding Risk Factors of Uterine Prolapse among Women in Reproductive Age Top


Nancy W. Wesley, Manjusha Mahakalkar

SRMMCON, Sawangi (M), Wardha, Maharashtra, India

Background: A uterine prolapse is a weakening of the pelvic floor muscles. As the muscle mass become weakened there is inadequate support for uterus and thus it could descend in the direction of vagina. The most common causes of uterine prolapse are multiparty and loss of oestrogen and increasing body mass index. Objectives: (1) To assess the knowledge regarding risk factors of uterine prolapse on women in reproductive age. (2) To find association between knowledge score with selected demographic variables. Study Design: Non experimental (pre experimental) one group pre test design. This study was based on Quantitative research approach. The sample was women in reproductive age. Population: women in reproductive age. Setting of the study: Selected rural area in wardha district. Samples Size: 60.Material: Structured questionnaire having 16 MCQs. The correct answer got score 1 and wrong answer got 0 scores. Results: The study shows that majority 29 (48%) women were having average level of knowledge, 18 (30%) women were having poor level of knowledge, 11 (18%) women were having good level of knowledge and 2 (3%) women were having excellent level of knowledge .The minimum score was 0 and minimum score was 14, the mean score was 6.37 respectively. Distribution of women in reproductive age according to their age in years shows the majority (25%) of them belongs to the age of 16-20 years, 23% were in the age of 21-25 years, 20% were in the age group of 26-30 years, 16% were in the age group of 31-35 years, 11% were in the age group of 36-40 years, and 3% were in the age group of 41-45years respectively. Distribution of women in reproductive age according to their education shows that majority of women (28%) were educated up to secondary level, 26% were educated up to primary level, (21%) were illiterate, 18% were educated up to graduation, 5%were educated up to post graduation respectively. Distribution of women according to their occupation shows majority of (36%)were wages based labour,33% were housewife, 20% were on public services, 10% were self-employed ie own business respectively. Distribution of women according to the previous information shows that majority of 75% have heard regarding uterine prolapse and 25% have not heard about uterine prolapse respectively. Distribution of women according to the sources of information shows that majority of (40%) have heard it from family and friends, 25% heard it from health professionals, 20% have heard from television and 11% from radio respectively. There was significant association of knowledge score in relation to Education and previous existing information. There was no significant association of knowledge score in relation to age, occupation, source. Conclusion: The findings reveal that the woman in reproductive age group has average knowledge regarding the risk factors of uterine prolapse. Extensive literature review confirms that there is a great need to educate the women in reproductive age regarding the risk factors of uterine prolapse and complication.

Keywords: Education, females, prolapse


  Oral 098 Top



  A Study to Assess the Knowledge on Food Practices among Postnatal Mothers Top


Ribeka P. James, Kavita Gomase

Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Smt. Radhikabai Meghe Memorial College of Nursing, Datta Meghe Institute of Medical Sciences (Deemed to be University), Sawangi (Meghe), Wardha, Maharashtra, India

Background: Women need to receive special health and social support during postnatal time to prevent problems. Inadequate care might result in complications for the mother and her child. Nutrition plays an important role in the course of the postpartum period. It is well documented that dietary modification during this period has a profound effect on the nutritional status of both the mother and the newborn. During this period, culture plays a major role in the way a woman perceives and prepares for her birthing experience. In fact, the notions of birth and postnatal care vary considerably with cultural beliefs and traditional practices. Each culture has its own values, beliefs and practices related to pregnancy and birth. According to recent studies, eating habits after delivery among American women are not very complex. Women simply -continue to eat a good quality diet similar to the diet that they used to consume during pregnancy. Objectives: (1) To assess the knowledge on food practice among postnatal mothers. (2) To associate the knowledge score with selected demographic variables. Study Design: descriptive research design. This study was based on Quantitative research approach. The sample was postnatal mothers admitted in A.V.B.H. hospital. Population: postnatal mothers. Setting of the study: A.V.B.H.hospital wardha Samples Size: 30.Material: Structured questionnaire having MCQs. The correct answer got score 1 and wrong answer got 0 scores. Results: Distribution of postnatal mothers according to their age in years shows the majority (76%) of them belongs to the age of 20-30 years, 6% were in the age of 30-40 years, 6% were in the age group of 40-50, 6% were in the age group of above 50 years .Distribution of postnatal mothers according to their religion shows that majority of women 66% were Hindu, 23% were Muslims, 10%were Christian. Distribution of postnatal mothers according to their occupation shows majority of 83% were house wife 13% were working women, 3% were own business. Distribution of postnatal mothers according to the family shows that majority of 83% were belongs to nuclear family and 16 % have not heard about food practice. Distribution of postnatal mothers women according to parity majority of (83%) have parity 10% have parity 2, 3% have parity 3 and 3% above parity 3. Distribution of postnatal mothers according to types of diet that majority of (73%) have vegetarian, 20% non vegetarian, 6% have taking mix diet. The majority 16 (53%) women were having average level of knowledge, 14 (46%) women were having good level of knowledge, 11 (18%) women were having good .The minimum score was 4 and miximum score was 11, the mean score was 7.80 respectively. Conclusion: The findings reveal that that majority 16 (53%) women were having average level of knowledge, 14 (46%) women were having good level of knowledge, 11 (18%) women were having good .The minimum score was 4 and miximum score was 11, the mean score was 7.80 respectively.

Keywords: Food, mothers, postnatal


  Oral 099 Top



  Assess the Effectiveness of Planned Teaching Program on Post-operative Self-Care among Cataract Patients Top


Pratiksha R. Kamdi

SRMMCON, Sawangi (M), Wardha, Maharashtra, India

Background: Cataract is a major cause of avoidable blindness and visual impairment throughout the world and is likely to present an increasing burden to health care systems as the world’s population ages due to increased life expectancy. From a public heath perspective, it is desirable to identify risk factors for the development and progression of cataract because although surgical intervention is an effective modality for restoring vision, there remain significant challenges in both delivery and utilization of cataract surgical services, especially by the most disadvantaged groups in the population. Objective: (1) To assess the existing knowledge regarding post operative self care among cataract patients. (2) To assess the effectiveness of planned teaching programme on post operative self care among cataract patients. (3) To associate post knowledge score with demographic variables. Research design: Interventional evaluatory approach. Setting of the Study: Acharya Vinoba Bhave Rural Hospital. Sawangi (M) Wardha. Sample: post operative patient. Sampling technique: non-probability convenient sampling technique. Sample size: 60 Tool: A structured questionnaire including Socio demographic variables and Knowledge regarding post operative self care. Results: The result of this the study findings show post-test 0(0%) of subjects are having poor level of knowledge score, 0(0%) were having average level of knowledge score, 25(41.66%) were having good, were having excellent level of knowledge 35(58.33%) knowledge regarding post operative self care among cataract patient. And the minimum score is 10, maximum score is 15, mean score is 12.87±1.321 and mean percentage is 80.4375%. The shows that there is a significant difference between pre test and post test knowledge scores interpreting effective planned teaching on knowledge regarding post operative self care among cataract patient . Mean value of pre test is 5.07 and post test is 12.87 and standard deviation values of pre test is 1.755 and post test is 1.321. The calculated t-value is 31.754 and tabulated t- value 2.02 and p-value is 0.000. Conclusion: There was significant increase in the knowledge scores of the study participants after giving planned teaching. This shows that, all women had positive effectiveness of planned teaching regarding post operative self care among cataract patient.

Keywords: Cataract, health, self-care


  Oral 100 Top



  The Knowledge and Awareness of Hypertension in Village Rasulabad of Wardha district Top


Prastuti Dhande, Jagruti Chaple

MGACH and RC, Salod (H), Wardha, Maharashtra, India

Background: Hypertension is a major public health burden and is part of an epidemiological transition from communicable to non communicable diseases globally. It is an important risk factor for stroke, coronary heart diseases, peripheral vascular disease, heart failure, and chronic kidney disease. The aging, urbanization, sedentary lifestyle, obesity, ethanol consumption, and excess salt intake are the contributing factors for epidemiological transition of hypertension in world. A cost-effective use of health services such as increasing the knowledge and awareness, detection, treatment, and control of hypertension (HT) is needed among public in developing countries, particularly about the risks associated with uncontrolled blood pressure. This study was aimed at assessing the subjects knowledge and awareness about hypertension. Aim and Objective: The Knowledge and awareness of hypertension in village Rasulabad of Wardha district. Materials and Methods: This was a cross sectional descriptive and comparative study. Permission was taken from the institutional ethical committee. Data was collected in village Rasulabad of Wardha District by personal interviews and blood pressure was measured prospectively. Results: The knowledge and awareness of hypertension were tested among 100 subjects with validated questionnaires. 13% people were having the knowledge about normal values of hypertension. Out of 100 subjects 24% were found hypertension and out of those 24 people 12 people were aware about it rest were unaware. Conclusion: These results suggest that, although general knowledge and awareness of hypertension is adequate upto certain limits, but patients do not have a comprehensive understanding of this condition. Hence it is urgent necessity to promote knowledge, awareness, and health literacy among the rural areas. An opportunity exists to focus patient education programs and interventions on cardiovascular risk associated with uncontrolled hypertension.

Keywords: Education, hypertension, rural


  Oral 101 Top



  Successful Management of Glomerulonephritis through Ayurveda: A Case Study Top


Prajkta A. Hagone

Department of Kayachikitsa, Mahtma Gandhi Ayurved College, Hospital and Research Centre, Salod (H), Wardha, Maharashtra, India

Glomerulonephritiesis a group of disease that injures the part of the kidney. An incidence of 9.5 cases per 100,000 patients year. It can be correlated with ushnavata and Manjishtameha described in Ayurveda because of similarities in clinical features. Here a case report of 35 year old female with the symptoms of glomerulonephritis is presented. On the day enrollment, her urine analysis showed numerous RBCs and pus cells. After seven days treatment with gokshuradi guugul, syrup neeri KFT. her urine report was near about normal. From this case study, it can be concluded that Ayurveda has potential to treat such conditions where we always refer the the patient to modern medicine. Research studies are needed for establishing the result. It is possible with the help of interdisciplinary research.

Keywords: Glomeruloneprities, mutraghata, ushnavata


  Oral 102 Top



  Awareness and Practices Regarding Menstrual Hygiene among Adolescent Girls Residing in Village of Rasulabad of Wardha District Top


Vaishnavi Hatwar, Jagruti Chapale

MGACH and RC, Salod (H), Wardha, Maharashtra, India

Background: Menstruation & menstrual practices in rural areas is still a matter of concern. Knowledge & awareness about menstrual hygiene is lacking among rural adolescent girls. Increase in knowledge in their early Childhood may help to mitigate sufferings of many women. With this background this study is being conducted in small village of Wardha district. Aim and Objective: To study awareness & practices regarding menstrual hygiene among adolescent girls residing in a village of Wardha district. Objectives were 1) To assess the awareness about menarche 2) To find out the prevailing practices for menstrual hygiene 3) To ascertain the association of Awareness of menstruation before menarche and Practices for menstruation hygiene with educational status of respondents and their mothers. Materials and Methods: A community-based cross-sectional study was conducted among adolescent girls in the age group 12-19 years & was personally interviewed based on predesigned structured proforma. Their responses were collected & analyzed. Results: Age of menarche of most of girls is between 12 to 16 years. 63% girls are unaware about knowledge of menstruation before menarche. In this study mothers were found to be a source of knowledge of 71% girls.74% girls knows that menstruation is a physiological process.79% girls use sanitary napkins. Conclusion: Many are still unaware about knowledge of menstruation before menarche & source of bleeding. There is a need to make them aware about this.

Keywords: Adolescent girls, menarche, menstrual hygiene, rural area


  Oral 103 Top



  Tradition of Idols Emersion and Water Pollution Top


Saurabh Holani

Mahatma Gandhi Ayurveda Medical College Hospital and Research Centre, Salod (H), Wardha, Maharashtra, India

Background: Water bodies in India have been polluting every year by emersion of idols of Lord Ganesh, Krishna, Goddess Durga, Sharada, Kali, Lakshi round the year on the occasions of festival celebration. The quantity and quality of water is being depleted continuously. Government has to spend crores of rupess in cleaning projects but it would be a waste without changing mindset of people. Objective: To aware people against such tradition with utmost care as linked with their emotions and religious faith. Materials and Methods: The evidence based documentary, road shows, campaign on TV, radio, cinema on consequences of water pollution due to such custom, throwing flowers, garlands, and other garbage along with industrial waste without proper treatment. Observation and Results: It is the need of the hour impose ban on followed by punishment on contravention of the same. All rivers of India are polluted by following the same tradition blindly and facing consequences. Conclusion: If concerted effort s of central and State government with zest and zeal are undertaken, it would prove successful and change the image of India.

Keywords: Indian tradition, religious practices, water pollution


  Oral 104 Top



  Current Pitfalls in Ayurveda Research and its Elucidation Top


Vaishali Kuchewar

Department of Kayachikitsa, MGACH and RC, Salod (H), Wardha, Maharashtra, India

Background: In India, there are sufficient numbers of Ayurved colleges but the proportion of quality education is trivial. Though the students are coming out with the degree of ‘Ayurvedacharya’, no one is practicing rather thinking about research in Ayurved. Most of the teachers involved in research are not due to curiosity but due to compulsion of project and publication. For post graduate students, research is just a ritual for acquiring degrees. The STS project is a good platform of research at undergraduate level but undergraduates are not sensitized regarding ethics and principles of research in their curriculum. Concept: There are certain reasons behind such scenario. First is no research environment in Ayurveda colleges. Lack of expert teachers to direct students regarding research methodology, biostatistics and scientific writing is the other cause. It is somewhat difficult to conduct meaningful research in basics of Ayurveda like Agni, aam, Koshtha, Rasa, veeryavipak due to lack of objective parameters. Today’s scenario of Clinical research is one drug-one disease. Ayurveda Treatment principles are combination based and individualized. It is difficult to get ethical clearance from IEC. There is a huge gap between how Ayurveda is practiced and how it is researched. There are some recommendations to overcome above issues. (1) It is needed to make the Curricula updated with recent advances as well as inculcation of different teaching modality like Journal club for undergraduates to inculcate research attitude in undergraduates. (2) There should be provision to allocate few hours of curriculum and Inviting successful Ayurveda clinicians to teach Ayurveda students to improve their clinical acumen. (3) There should be regular quality training program for teachers to update their knowledge in real sense. (4) There should be compulsory provision for real time research data entry (non-modifiable) to avoid data fabrication. A mechanism for auditing the research review committees and ethics committees is to be put in place.5.It is needed to do research in collaboration than isolation. Conclusion: There is a huge scope of research in Ayurveda but for this all Ayurveda Institutes as well as Governing bodies of Ayurveda must take initiative to overcome the obstacles.

Keywords: Ayurveda, drawbacks, ethics, research


  Oral 105 Top



  Concept of Bioethics in Ayurveda Top


Sadhana Misar Wajpeyi

Department of Kayachikitsa, MGACH and RC, Salod (H), Wardha, Maharashtra, India

Background: Ethics is concerned with moral principles, values and standards of conduct (WHO). Ethics is a set of philosophical beliefs and practices concerned with the distinction between right and wrong. Medical Ethics is the branch of ethics that deals with moral issues in medical practice. Aim and Objective: To study the concepts of ethics given in Ayurvedic classics as well as in conventional medicine. Materials and Methods: By reviewing the literature of Ayurveda and conventional medicine to gather information regarding medical ethics. Results: According to Ayurveda, health does not mean just a disease free body, but also a healthy mind, soul and society. Ayurveda sets the code of conduct to achieve this goal. “Swasthasyaswastharakshanam and aturasyavikarprashamanam” is the main aim of Ayurveda. For swasthyarakshana Ayurveda emphasized the need for a healthy lifestyle by following dietary, behavioral and seasonal regimens given in swasthavrutta by Acharya Vagbhata, in AstangaHridaya. The knowledge of ethics helps medical professionals to identify difficult situations and to deal with them in a rational way. Ethics is also essential in physicians’ communications with the general public, their colleagues and to carry out medical research. There are four basic principles of bioethics namely autonomy, beneficence, non-maleficence and justice which are known as “principlism”. These are adapted as universal ethics. Originally, Ayurveda has advocated an ethical code of conduct in various aspects. This paper aims to study universally accepted principles of bioethics along withAyurvedic ethics. It was observed that the ethics is very clearly defined and described in classics of Ayurveda in the form of Sadvritta, Chatushpada, Yogya, VaidyavrittiAacharaRasayana and pathyapathya. Hence, Ayurveda should be considered as a pioneer in setting up the basics of bioethics. Conclusion: Medical ethics is a fundamental part of Ayurveda and its inclusion in medical teaching as well as in day to day practice will definitely pave way to excellent results. Medical profession is noble and it will be more respected if we follow the principles of Ayurveda along with Medical Ethics at present day too.

Keywords: Ayurveda, ethics, research


  Oral 106 Top



  SCOPUS Model to Inculcate Ethical Values in Students Top


Pradnya Deepak Dandekar

Department of Kriya Sharir, Mahatma Gandhi Ayurved College Hospital and Research Centre, Salod (H), Wardha, Maharashtra, India

Introduction: Overall goal of undergraduate educational programme is to create a competent graduate who serve the society efficiently with his/her knowledge. ‘SCOPUS’ model is a structured model of ‘Students Co- Peer Under guidance Study program’. It is basically designed for the students to develop professionalism which includes qualities demonstrating commitment to effective performance, confidence, responsibility, honesty and ethical values. Ethical behaviour is good for business and involves demonstrating respect for key moral principles. Rationale of Invention: This invention is to incorporate changes in education system by involving students’ participation in teaching & learning process to develop a competent graduate with good attitude & communication with ethical values. SCOPUS Model: Model of ‘Student Co-peer Under guidance Study’ explores active role of Co-peers. The students of higher level can be consider as Co- peers who guide lower level students of same professional course. In this model Co-peer, the higher level students’ will be called as mentors & lower level students of same professional course will be called as mentees. In SCOPUS model, during the process the mentees get guidance from mentors. While mentoring & helping the mentees in their studies; the mentors will be also get benefitted with number of affective outcomes like communication, teaching, feel of responsiveness, development of leadership qualities, also undergo changes in their attitude of learning topics & become more responsive in application of knowledge. It says that ‘Teaching to someone is learning twice’. So they try to develop themselves in the respective competence. They demonstrate commitment to effective performance confidence, responsibility. They learn the skill of good communication. Advantages Offered: (1) It helps the mentees to solve their academic problems from mentors who are the co-peers of them. (2) All the three domains i.e. ‘Cognitive, Psychomotor and Affective’ can be taken care of. (3) It helps to develop good communication between senior & junior students.4.It also helps the peer students to develop as good communicator, lifelong learner, a professional with leadership qualities and responsiveness.

Keywords: Communication skill, co-peers, mentees, mentors, SCOPUS model


  Oral 107 Top



  Ethics for Pumsavana Karma in Ayurveda Top


Bhagyashri Vijay Chaudhari

Department of Prasuti Tantra and Striroga, Mahatma Gandhi Ayurved College, Hospital and Research Centre, Salod (H), Wardha, Maharashtra, India

In classics ‘Suputrakameeya’ is the word mentioned which gives evidences about the desire of getting healthy, intellectual and beautiful progeny. The worldwide popular ‘Garbha Samskara’ includes many important methods starting from the selection of partner to procure healthy progeny. Matruj ahar (diet), vihar (habitat and environment), Mana, Buddhi (psyche) and other routines are the influencing factors for the fetus. And these things are known to us from decades. Pumsavana karma is one of the shodasha karmas (sixteen rituals) which has to be perform in different stages of life. It related to technique of genetic engineering to ensure healthy progeny. These is a misconstrue among the community that the practice of pumsavana karma is to be done for getting male child. In some states of India may quacks misuse and malpractice in the name of pumsavana karma and take off huge amount from people by giving false drugs. In Indian tradition people tries with various means to have a son either by multiple pregnancy or sex selective abortion or by pre – post conception techniques. Things get troubled by exponential rise in incidence of female feticide and so the government enacted the PNDT Act (1994) to curb the practice. There is also a misconception that the drug of pumsavana karma proceed with hermaphrodite child or congenital malformation. However this is the issue of a scientific study. Practitioner needs to be educated regarding the things. All the drugs of pumsavana are safe and do not cause any harm if followed by Ayurveda Classics. AYUSH department should set standard guidelines for pumsavana with indications. Amendmeat is needed by the law of Govt. Of India by considering PNDT Act (1994). It should allow specific use of Pumsavana karma in pregnancy by certified specialist who are M.S. in Prasuti tantra and Striroga . And care should be taken that it should not be misuse.

Keywords: Garbha samskara, Pumsavana karma


  Oral 108 Top



  Ethical Issues in Cancer Care through Ayurveda Top


Priyanka Shelotkar, Swapnil Borage

Department of Kaumarbhritya, MGACH and RC Salod (H), Wardha, Maharashtra, India

Background: The second most common disease in India responsible for maximum mortality is Cancer, with about 0.3 million deaths per year. Though there are good diagnostic methods and treatment, cancer is still a big risk to our society. Ayurveda is the most commonly used complementary alternative medicine (CAM) in India. As it is add-on to conventional cancer care. Now this is need of an hour to make collaboration between Ayurveda and modern physicians with mutual trust in the management of cancer. Along with this to set standard treatment protocols was very well recognized in various meetings, and integrative oncology programs have been initiated in a few institutes across India. But still there are some ethical issues regarding this integrative oncology. Description of Concept: Today is the era of evidence based medicine and we are lacking with generating evidence of the benefits of Ayurveda intervention. Also deficit of publishing systematic reviews of prior research studies exploring the safety and efficacy of Ayurveda in the management of cancer, ensuring comprehensive clinical documentation based on categorization of patients. We have well knowledge about mode of action of herbal as well as modern drugs but we are not aware with herb–modern drug interaction. So, herb–modern drug interaction studies and chemo sensitivity studies, based on both laboratory research and clinical observations must be conducted. Acknowledgement of the medico legal and ethical issues involved in integrative oncology and developing strategies for clinical practice and research should be made. Making available insurance coverage for integrative oncology care, keeping in mind the aim of universal health coverage, will facilitate more number of patients towards integrative management for cancer. Conclusion: Through appropriate cooperation with modern medicine, Ayurveda can make substantial contributions for the advances of integrative oncology. This can discover the specific health challenges and open up new opportunities for the development of integrative Ayurveda oncology in the world.

Keywords: Ayurveda, cancer, integrative oncology


  Oral 109 Top



  Ethical Issues Regarding Research on Ayurveda Drugs Top


Priyanka Shelotkar, Swapnil Borage

Department of Shalakyatantra, MGACH and RC Salod (H), Wardha, Maharashtra, India

Background: Human beings are using herbal, and herbomineral drugs since ancient era. Especially in countries like India, many of herbal drugs and formulations are used in different disciplines of medicine like Ayurveda, Siddha and Unani. It is estimated that about 25% of all allopathic medicines are directly or indirectly derived from plants sources. The contribution of developing countries in global herbal business is very poor due to lack of common standards and appropriate methods for evaluating Traditional Medicine to ensure the safety, efficacy and quality control. This creates the need to develop a standard operational procedure for the standardization of herbal, and herbomineral drugs and formulations. Standardizing the evaluation protocols including both quality control and quality assurance of herbal and herbomineral drugs will play a major role in providing highly reliable and potent herbals medicines. This will also, attract international market, thus generating revenue. This article intends to focus, various ethical issues being faced by researchers in Ayurveda, and suggests a unique approach for the preparation of Standard Operating Procedures/guidelines for the standardization of all herbomineral formulations. It also highlights the need for systematic clinical trials of medicinal herbal medicines to enhance global acceptance. Description of Concept: Several factors might contribute to of such issues & discrepancies, for example: Lack of standardization and quality control of the herbal drugs used in clinical trials; Use of different dosages of herbal medicines; Inadequate randomization in most studies, and patient’s batch not properly selected; Numbers of patients in most trials are insufficient for the attainment of statistical significance; Difficulty in establishing appropriate placebos because of the taste and aroma etc; Wide variations in the duration of treatments using herbal medicines. Conclusion: A uniform research policy across the worls, in herbal medicines is need of the hour. All the critical Pharmacopoeial tests such as dissolution time, Contaminations with microbial, pesticide and heavy metals, etc. must be in accordance with global standards. Presently developing countries like India, lacked the necessary guidelines for clinical trials on Ayurvedic/herbal medicines. If the WHO guidelines can be adopted in developing countries to approve clinical studies without the need for stringent safety data, clinical trials on Ayurvedic medicine can be encouraged to be at par with pharmaceutical products

Keywords: Clinical trials, ethics, herbal drugs, traditional medicine


  Oral 110 Top



  A Critical Review of Medical Ethics in Ayurveda and Its Relevance in Today’s Era Top


Pooja Shrivastav, Ramesh Babu Devalla

Department of Shalyatantra, MGACH and RC, Salod (H), Wardha, Maharashtra, India

Introduction: Ethics is a branch of Philosophy which involves systematizing, defending and recommending concepts of right and wrong conducts for the individual and for society. It establishes the nature of obligations, or the duties that people owe themselves and one another. Ayurveda is the treasure of medical literature including ethics where Acharyas emphasized various medical ethics in the form of Sadvrutta. Those ethics are found to have rationale and more relevant in today’s era also. Objectives: This literature review explored the medical ethics in Ayurveda mentioned by different Acharyas and to see its relevance in contemporary Medicine. The method followed for this was thorough analysis of Bruhattrayi, Modern medicine texts and net surfing for various research articles. Review Findings: After surfing various research articles, classical and modern text it was found that medical ethics in Ayurveda have its imprint even in today’s era also. Codes of conduct i.e sadvrutta mentioned in Ayurveda are very much similar to that which is described in modern medicine. Conclusion: The ethical concept described in Ayurveda includes general ethics in reference to physical and moral conducts of student, professional and academic ethics, Pre-operative, Operative and post operative ethics, ethics of experimental Surgery and ethics in emergency. All these concepts are strikingly similar relevance to contemporary medical ethics which includes importance of consent; ethics for doctor patient relationship, ethics for professional practice, patient’s autonomy, ethics in the operations theatre and general rights and privileges in practice etc.

Keywords: Contemporary medicine, ethics, philosophy, sadvrutta


  Oral 111 Top



  Need of Ethical Ayurveda Prescription in Clinical Practice Top


Bharat Rathi

MGACH and RC Salod (H), Wardha, Maharashtra, India

Background: Prescribing Ayurvedic medicines for the majority of the ailments is increasing throughout the globe. Rise in population, cost of allopathic treatment for general ailments, side effects of modern drugs and development of resistance have led to increase emphasis on the use of alternative medicines. It is matter of concern that Ayurveda physicians without doing thorough examination of patients as advised by Ayurveda seers are writing lengthy prescriptions which sometimes leads to severe threats and unethical. Many of them hide the contents and use to give medicines from them without label. Objectives: To study the concepts of ethics in writing Ayurveda prescription in clinical practiceas per Ayurvedic classics. Methods: Literature search is done in various Samhitas indicating ethics for prescribing Ayurvedic medicines for patients. Review Findings: Acharya Charaka suggested Dashvidha Pariksha before arriving any diagnosis. Charaka emphasizes that ideal drug or treatment is the one which does not lead to any side effects, while curing a disease. Great caution is warranted by Seer while prescribing medicines in children, elderly and pregnant ladies and prefers prescribing disease-specific drugs in proper doses and with proper anupana. Symptomatic treatment approaches are to be avoided.Diet, certain habits, lifestyle must be taken into account while prescription writing. Conclusion: Thorough examination will certainly help to arrive at a perfect diagnosis and prescription writing. Multiple formulations lead to overdosing of medicines and developing Adverse Drug Reactions (ADRs) in patients. Thus Ayurvedic prescription should be doshaj specific, palatable, apt in dose and number.

Keywords: Ayurveda, ayurveda medicine, dashvidha pariksha, ethics, prescription


  Oral 112 Top



  The Effect of Eye Exercise, TriphalaKwath Eye Wash on Computer Vision Syndrome Top


Roshna S. Bhutada, Roshna S. Bhutada

Department of Shalakya Tantra, MGACH and RC, Datta Meghe Institute of Medical Sciences, Sawangi (Meghe), Wardha, Maharashtra, India

Background: CVS is a serious problem for the millions of people who spend hours in front of the computer. In modern lifestyle every person is getting affected due to radiation may be due to VDT (Video display terminals), computer, T.V. and CFL lamp. Being a disease of the modern era, it is difficult to get the nearest resembling disease in Ayurveda excellence. Ayurveda being the science of life, everything including ideal life style has been mentioned in it in the form of Dinachairya, Rituchariya, Ratrichariya etc. Aim and Objective: The purpose of this study is (1) To select the patients having CVS as well as not having CVS but doing computer work more than three hours. (2) To recommend appropriate quick exercise at appropriate time intervals for extensive computer users. (3) To give the awareness about action of drug before starting the Treatment ethically. Materials and Methods: The present study is controlled clinical study the effect of Eye Exercise, TriphalaKwath Eye Wash in relieving the signs and symptoms of CVS. Materials and methods of this pilot study were planned on 40 samples of CVS. Samples were treated with TriphalaKwath eye wash & Eye Exercise as recommended, assessed once in 7 days up to 42 day. The Ethics were followed before giving the treatment & consent was taken. Results: This study revealed that showed above average 55% relief for most of the subjective criteria and objective criteria like dry eye ( by schirmer test), Eye Strain, Headache p value were < 0.01 i.e. highly Significant,. For Itching, Burning sensation, Neck & shoulder pain and p value were < 0.05 is Significant While the Result is non significant in the Redness of Eye, Blurred Vision P>0.05 upto interval of 42 Day. Conclusion: The CVS patient can prepare TriphalaKwath & take Eye Wash easily. The Significant reduction in dry tired eyes, Eye strain, itching, burning, headache, neck shoulder & back pain of different Symptom of Computer vision syndrome, Non-Significant in the Redness of Eye, Blurred Vision.

Keywords: Computer vision syndrome, dinacharya, ethics in public health, eye exercise, rasayana, TriphalaKwath


  Oral 113 Top



  Role of the Nitya Virechana in Medoroga Top


Shamli Hiware

Department of Panchakarma, MGACH and RC, Salod (H), Wardha, Maharashtra, India

Introduction: Medoroga (overweight) has become a burning problems of the caused by unconventional dietary habits and regimen. In Ayurveda it is said that the etiological factors which increase kapha, and kapha increases the fat (Medovriddhi) there by it reflects as hyperlipedemia in blood. The body lipids do the function of unction (binding the tissue) but when vitiated deposited as adipose (durmedas). According to the World Health Organization (WHO), obesity is one of the most common, yet among the most neglected, public health problems in both developed and developing countries. The medovahastrotodushti i.e. obliteration or occlusion with depositions leads to Sthula (Obesity) or Atishthoola (morbid obesity). If the medoroga is prevented at right time there may not any risk generative factorial development or disease establishment. Present study combination is helpful even in constipated people. Objectives: To evaluate the effectiveness of Panchakarma in the management of Medoroga. Materials and Methods: This study was carried out in the department of Panchakarma MGACHRC Salod (H). The virechana is one out of five eliminative procedures by which the fat deposition was accumulated in the patient which were expelled out. In this patient we did procedure of nitya virechan in Medoroga for 7 days. Observation: Nitya Virechana showed significant results in the management of Medoroga. Conclusion: It concluded that the, Trivruttadi Ksheerpaka show the positive effect on reducing lipid profile in the Medoroga.

Keywords: Ksheerpaka, Medoroga, virechana


  Oral 114 Top



  Critical Review on Panchakarma from Bhavprakash Nighantu Top


Vibha Tadas

Department of Panchakarma, MGACH and RC, Salod (H), Wardha, Maharashtra, India

Introduction: Panchakarma is a set of five therapies delineate mainly for cleansing the body toxins to achieve balanced state of body that facilitates rejuvenation. Ayurveda considers that the purification of the body is important before the commencement of any other therapy. Shodhana chikitsa is considered superior to shamana chikitsa because disease treated with shodhana therapy will never recur, whereas the disease treated with shaman therapy may recur in due course of time. There has many scattered information about pannchakarma in nighantu The word Nighantu in Ayurveda implies the group of drugs, synonyms, properties and their description of part used. Ayurveda treatment possesses herbal, mineral, animal origin products which mainly take part in the treatment of various health ailments. Bhavprakasha Nighantu is one of them and is oldest Ayurvedic materia medica. As bhavprakah give most important to pancakarma as daily routine life he has mentioned detailed of each and every aspect of panchakarma praocedure. There are separate chapters are allotted for each procedure i,e snehapanvidhi, panchakaramavidhi, vamanam, virechanam, anuvasan, niruha, anuvasanam, dhoompanvidhi, swedanvidhi with all specific preparation for these different panchakarma are also separately and clearly mentioned in the context of treatment of each disease condition. Objectives: Critical Review on Panchakarma from Bhavprakash Nighantu. Review Findings: The method followed for this was thorough analysis of Nighantu. Conclusion: The present paper is an attempt to highlight the panchakarma in bhavprakash nighantu.

Keywords: Bhavprakasha, Nighantu, Panchakarma


  Oral 115 Top



  Clinical Efficacy of Prachhana Karma in Indralupta (Alopecia Areata): A Case Report Top


Satyam S. Supare

Department of Shalyatantra, Mahatma Gandhi Ayurved College Hospital and Research Centre, Salod (H), Wardha, Maharashtra, India

Introduction: Indralupta is deliberated under Kshudraroga by most of the authors of classical Ayurvedic texts, in which there is a hair loss from some or all areas of the body usually from scalp, it shows one or more spot on the scalp. It is named as Alopecia areata in modern science. It is affecting psychological and communal status of a person. It accounts for 2-3% of the new dermatology cases in UK and USA, 3.8% in China, and 0.7% in India. Treatment available is corticosteroids (minoxidil, anthralin, topical imunotheorapy, phototherapy, salfasalazine etc.)1 in modern medicine but it has complications and limitations in chronic cases with longer use. Acharya Sushrut has preferred Upakramas like Raktamokshana, Prachhana, Lepaetc in the management of Indralupta. In order to evaluate the efficacy of Prachhana Karma and Gunjabeeja lepa in regeneration of hair in Indralupta, present study was conducted. Case Summary: In this Case Report patient with Indralupta was treated with Prachhana karma and Gunjabeeja lepa application after all the mandatory investigations. Prachhana karma was done as per described in the classical text and negative vacuum pressure was created over the prachhita area followed by Gunjabeeja lepa application after every five days upto one month. Conclusion: From the above study it is concluded that Prachhana karma followed by Gunjabeejlepa helps in the regrowth of hairs. So there is scope for further study on large sample size.

Keywords: Alopecia areata, Gunjabeejalepa, Indralupta, Prachhana karma, Raktamokshana


  Oral 117 Top



  Ethical Importance of Implied Consent in Patients of Outpatient Department in a Tertiary Care Rural Hospital in Wardha District Top


Shashank Gotarkar, Prakash Mohite, Guddi Laishram, Nikhil Dhande

Department of Community Medicine, Jawaharlal Nehru Medical College, Sawangi (Meghe), Wardha, Maharashtra, India

Introduction: In simple terms, Implied Consent can be defined as an instrument of mutual communication between doctor and patient with an expression of authorization / permission / choice by the patient for the doctor to act in a particular way. This form of consent is used in place of or in conjunction with informed or explicit consent. Implied consent means that consent is based on someone’s actions or circumstances. The very act of a patient entering a doctor’s chamber and expressing his problem is taken as an implied (or implicit) consent for general physical examination and routine investigations. Consent is necessary for photographing a patient for scientific / educational / research purpose or for follow up. The concept of consent arises from the ethical principle of patient autonomy and basic human rights. Patient’s has all the freedom to decide what should or should not happen to his/her body and to gather information before undergoing a test/procedure/surgery. No one else has the right to compel the patient to act in a particular way. Even a doctor can only act as a facilitator in patient’s decision making. It has been assumed that the patients visiting the doctors are giving their consent for examination and other things necessary for their diagnosis and treatment. There are very less study observed for rural hospitals about the awareness of implied consent. The objective was to find out the ethical importance of implied consent in patients attending the tertiary care rural hospital. The data was collected in the OPD of three departments, for the period of 3 months. Sample size was calculated on the basis of total patients visiting the OPD per month. The patients between the age group of 18-50 were enrolled. A validated questionnaire was given to them. Observation and Results: It was observed that 78 % of the patients were aware about the implied consent for examination as they enter the OPD. They did not find any bridging of autonomy or any bridging of their rights. Conclusion: The patients coming at rural hospital are finding the full faith in the doctors and they understood the implied consent. They are fully satisfied by giving the non-written/implied consent to the doctors.

Keywords: Ethical importance, implied consent, tertiary care hospital, out-patient department


  Oral 118 Top



  Evaluation of an Efficacy of Siravyadhana (Blood Leeting) in Venous Ulcer: A Vein Alarm Case Study Top


Devyani Dasar (Jaiswal)

Department of Shalyatantra, Mahatma Gandhi Ayurved College Hospital and Research Centre, Salod (H), Wardha, Maharashtra, India

Ulceration of the foot is common, disabling and frequently leads to amputation of the leg. Mortality is high and healed ulcers often recur. Venous ulcer are wounds that are thought to occur due to improper functioning of venous valves, mechanical changes in confirmation of the bony architecture of the foot, peripheral neuropathy and atherosclerotic peripheral arterial disease. Its occurrence is 70%-90% of leg Ulcer cases. The risk of lower extremity amputation is 15 to 46 times higher. Acharya Susrutha has given prime importance to the knowledge and management of vranas. Sushruta have mentioned visravana as 9thupakrama among the shastiupakramas. Among the various methods of raktamokshana, Siravyadhana is selected for this study. It is considered to restore and improve blood circulation to tissues and re-establishes venous drainage. It improves the quantity of oxygen in the circulating blood to optimum level. Case Summary: Triphala and Mamsarohini kwatham Dhavan once in a day daily along with Siravyadhana twice a week (14 days) after taking written informed consent. Triphala and Mamsarohini kwatham Dhavan is the most efficacious local application for itching and discolouration at foot. Siravyadhana found effective in healing Of Venous Ulcer. Conclusion: Triphala and Mamsarohini kwatham Dhavan and Siravyadhana found effective in healing Of Venous Ulcer within short span of time with good healing, for which billion dollars is spend worldwide in vain. It is easy to prepare. This miraculous healing procedure should be propagated so that millions of patients can save their legs.

Keywords: Siravyadhana, Triphala and Mamsarohini kwatham Dhavan, venous ulcer


  Oral 119 Top



  Role of Ayurveda in Establishment of Basic Principle of Bioethics W.S.R. to Beneficence Top


Anita Wanjari, Kiran Tawalare

Department of Rasashatra and Bhaishajya Kalpana, MGACH and RC, Salod (H), Wardha, Maharashtra, India

Introduction: Ethics deal with the set of principles of right conduct. The four basic principles of Bioethics autonomy, beneficence, non-malfeasance and justice are known as principalism. Ayurved has mentioned the code of conduct for physician. It is mentioned in the form of Chatushpad, Yogya, Vaidyavruti and Achar Rasayan. Beneficence is the duty always to act in the best interest of patient or benefits of others. In Ayurved compendia have given guidelines by which physician will become skillful in diagnosis, practice and operating instruments and cauterization, through which safety of patient can be achieved. Aim and Objectives: To study the Ayurvedic ethics in view of beneficence, one of the basic principles of bioethics. Materials and Methods: The data was reviewed from ayurvedic compendias, text books, research articles and e-media. Results and Discussion: Acharya Sushruta has explained and demonstrated different kinds of Yogya Vidhi. For example practice of excision can be done on Pumpkin & cucumber, scraping can be practiced on dead animal leather with hairs, Puncturing can be done on veins of dead animal and stalk of lily plant. Suturing should be practiced by using thin and thick clothes. . Bandaging should be practiced by using models prepared of mud or clothes. After observing premonitory symptoms preventing treatment can be given to avoid disease condition. Avoiding the cause of disease is the treatment in brief to protect the health of a person is explained by Charak. Conclusion: Ayurveda places great emphasis on ethics. Concepts similar to respect for autonomy, beneficence, non-malfeasance and justice are found in Ayurvedic texts. Ayurvedic ethics are oriented toward the principle of beneficence.

Keywords: Basic principle of bioethics in ayurveda, beneficence, yogya vidhi


  Oral 120 Top



  Ayurvedic Management of Sciatic Mononeuropathy: A Case Study Top


Shweta Parwe

Department of Panchakarma, Mahatma Gandhi Ayurved College Hospital and Research Centre, Salod (H), Wardha, Maharashtra, India

Introduction: Sciatic mononeropathy is one of the most common neuropathies of the lower extremities, second only to common fibular (peroneal) neuropathy. One of the most comman presentations of sciatic neuropathy is foot drop. When patients present with foot drop, they are initially investigated for common causes of foot drop such as L5 radiculopathy or peroneal nerve palsy. Other lower motor neuron lesions causing foot drop include sciatic mononeuropathy, lumbosacral plexopathy, polyneuropathy, or a severe L5 radiculopathy The Indian system of Medicine has anecdotal accounts of success in the management of sciatic mononeuropathy in the actual clinical practice even though it lacks the evidence based medical research data. This report is one of on the “Panchakarma Therapy “is such therapy that could improve treatment outcomes in sciatic mononeuropathy. Case Summary: We present the case of a man who presented with lower extremity weakness, pain, and cramps, and was initially diagnosed at an outside institution with L4-5 and S1 radiculopathies and recommended for spine surgery. He came to us for a second opinion. A pre and post test case report selected of a 42 years old male patient who diagnosed L4-5 and S1 Radiculopathy. He came to Panchakarma OPD with following symptoms lumber pain radiation to left leg since two years, weakness in left leg since from three months, difficulty in walking and Drooping of left fore foot while walking since three months, on examination we found muscle wasting on same leg. He was admitted with internal external Panchakarma therapies and the study subject assessed before treatment, after treatment and on follow up for improvement using NCV parameters. Conclusion: All the symptoms observed in the beginning were found considerably reduced, and severity also found mild. On the follow-up, it concluded that the in sciatic mononeuropathy subject doing his routine work properly without support.

Keywords: Ayurveda, panchakarma therapy, radiculopathy, sciatic mononeuropathy


  Oral 121 Top



  Ethical Issues in Manufacturing of Herbal Medicines in Ayurveda Top


Sneha Vidhate

Department of Dravyaguna, Mahatma Gandhi Ayurved College Hospital and Research Centre, Salod (H), Wardha, Maharashtra, India

Western medical ethics are guided by four central moral principles- autonomy, beneficence, non malificence and justice, collectively known as ‘principlism’. Herbal medicines make a vital contribution to healthcare globally. It involves evolution from production to practice. A number of dreaded effects have been seen in the patients due to unethical and unjudicious use of herbal drugs. There are many allegations that information about herbal medications can be dangerously misleading. Also there is deleterious impact upon local environment and communities. Herbal medicines make a vast contribution to global healthcare. It acts as a traditional and a complementary form of treatment and importance source of new conventional drugs. In this paper, suggestions are made as how the values can be realised within each of these activities but also key to enhancing ethical practice in herbal medicine. It is greater investment in research. Ethical challenges and actions are needed to address them clearly. There are some Ayurvedic ethics which describes the instructions given by Acharyas. So Ayurveda places great emphasis on ethics through applications of this framework, the ethical challenges and actions needed to address them become clear. There are many practical recommendations for enhancing ethical standards in herbal medicines. Thus this study focuses on the ethical issues to be kept in mind during the framework of manufacture of herbal medicines.

Keywords: Allegation, autonomy, beneficence, principlism


  Oral 122 Top



  Ethics in Animal Experimentation Top


Shanti Manyala

Department of Agadtantra Vyavhar Ayurved Evum Vidhi Vaidhayak, Mahatma Gandhi Ayurved College Hospital and Research Centre, Salod (H), Wardha, Maharashtra, India

Animal research had a vital role in many scientific and medical advances which aid to our understanding of various diseases. Animal experimentations are an integral part of any new drug discovery. Subsequent development of new medicines and treatment has led to a better quality of life. Scientists owe their great advance and knowledge in biomedical research to millions of animals, which they use every year in often times extremely painful and distressing scientific procedures. Ethics in animal experimentation is one of the pivotal issues for consideration. Many of the animal rights extremists and anti- vivisectionist groups believe that animal experimentation is cruel and unnecessary, regardless of its purpose or benefit. In many of the studies, animals have to be sacrificed for the cause. Animals play a very vital role in the foodchain. Thus good animal welfare and human science are essential for ensuring the judicious use of animals. Additional review process, independent ethical advice particularly with respect to applications for project licences, standards of animal care and welfare are required. It is very essential to develop initiatives for the widest possible application of the 3Rs – replacement, reduction and refinement in research. Thus while doing the animal experimentation of any drug, it becomes very essential to follow certain ethics mentioned by the Animal ethics committee for the safe and judicious use of the animals for the welfare of the humans and development of the society. This study mainly focuses on the ethical issues related with animal experimentation, precautions to be taken and how to overcome the major issues related with animal experimentation.

Keywords: Extremists, refinement, research, vivisectionist


  Oral 123 Top



  Perception of Plagiarism among Physiotherapy Professionals Practicing in Maharashtra: A Survey Based Cross Sectional Study Top


Surbhi Hindocha

Dr. Ulhas Patil College of Physiotherapy, Jalgaon, Maharashtra, India

Background: Plagiarism is an unethical act of duplicating someone’s work or ideas and presenting it under one’s own name without acknowledging the actual source. It is globally arising to be a major threat to integrity of academia and scientific research. The incidence is mushrooming amongst healthcare professionals practicing in India thereby jeopardizing sound ethical conduct. This study aimed to determine the extent to which physiotherapy professionals practicing in Maharashtra plagarise, their knowledge, understanding and perception of plagiarism and the underlying factors that may lead them to do it. Aim and Objective: This cross-sectional study was carried out among a sample of 367 physiotherapy professionals practicing in Maharashtra. A survey was done using a structured self-reported questionnaire. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was carried out among a sample of 367 physiotherapy professionals practicing in Maharashtra. A survey was done using a structured self-reported questionnaire. Results: Out of 367 respondents, 59.94% had somewhat knowledge about plagiarism. 89.9% individuals considered it as unethical but 74.9% were unaware about it’s legal ramifications. 39.8% participants confessed the use of plagiarism due to laziness (14.9%) and pressure to meet deadlines(14.9%). 34.3% participants admitted to resorting to copy and paste method. Conclusion: The study concludes that there is a lack of understanding about plagiarism and its legal consequences among physiotherapy professionals practicing in Maharashtra. It was found that those who were unaware about it had inadvertently practiced the same. This calls up for an emerging need to increase the awareness about it in order to avoid this type of academic misconduct.

Keywords: Ethics, physiotherapy, plagiarism


  Oral 124 Top



  Designing the Bioethical Competency-based Curriculum for Physical Therapy in India Top


Lajwanti Lalwani

Department of Cardiovascular and Respiratory Sciences, Ravi Nair Physiotherapy College, DMIMS, Sawangi (Meghe), Wardha, Maharashtra, India

Background: As per world confederation for the physical therapy “Physical therapy is providing services to people and population to develop maintain and restore maximum movement and functional ability throughout the lifespan”. Physical therapist assess the patient, functionally diagnosis the patient and also provide physical therapy treatment to various range of condition i.e musculoskeletal, neurological and cardiorespiratory. Aim and Objective: Physical therapy assessment, diagnosis and treatment come across various bioethical issues that are very less or rarely discussed .so physical therapy is one of the emerging branches for bioethics. With the expanding number of physical therapy colleges, institutes in India .it is a timely to develop a common framework in bioethics for physical therapy so that students and professional are able to solve the bioethical issues. Objective: To identify core competencies and map with their domains. Materials and Methods: Steps such as situation assessment, survey of physical therapy college, institutes, discussion with professionals in India were undertaken to develop proposed bioethical competency based for physical therapy in India. The learning outcome is not clearly defined in curriculum of physical therapy. The finding of the survey suggest that physical therapy courses in India should have competencies ranging from communication with patients/relatives, autonomy of patients, justice for the patient, consent for the treatment, assessment, research, avoiding conflicts, equality for patients, plagiarism. Competency statements were framed and mapped with various domains including clinical practice, academics, policy, planning and financial and professionalism. Results: This proposed competency based framework for Indian physical therapy program can be adapted to need of the curriculum. This framework ensures the uniqueness of individual physical therapy courses in India while contributing to measure of overall success of patient treatment and bioethical improvement. Conclusion: This bioethical competency based curriculum for physical therapy in India will increase the understanding the depth of bioethics among physical therapist and will improve the approach towards patients.

Keywords: Bioethics, competency statements, physical therapy






 

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Effectiveness of...
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Awareness and Et...
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A Survey of Drin...
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Assessment of Bl...
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Importance of In...
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A Study of Strat...
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Evaluation of Ca...
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Effect of Lifest...
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Knowledge, Attit...
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A Cross-Sectiona...
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Ethical Issues o...
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Knowledge, Attit...
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Incidence of Ant...
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Determination an...
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Are You Willing ...
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Risk Factors for...
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To Correlate Lum...
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Clinical Profile...
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Awareness of Pat...
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Oral 050
Knowledge and Pe...
Oral 051
Effect of Sudars...
Oral 052
Gender Issues in...
Oral 053
Voluntary or Reg...
Oral 054
Impact of Servic...
Oral 055
Comparison of Su...
Oral 056
To Evaluate Micr...
Oral 057
Early Detection:...
Oral 058
Knowledge, Attit...
Oral 059
Conceptual Measu...
Oral 060
Effect of Nonsur...
Oral 061
Oral Cancer Stig...
Oral 062
A study on Relat...
Oral 063
Health Seeking B...
Oral 064
Evaluation of As...
Oral 065
Knowledge and Pe...
Oral 066
Study of Antibio...
Oral 067
Comparative Eval...
Oral 068
Feeding Practice...
Oral 069
Effect of Oral H...
Oral 070
To Correlate the...
Oral 071
To Evaluate the ...
Oral 072
Health Care Seek...
Oral 073
Dentists’ ...
Oral 074
Assessment of Co...
Oral 075
To Compare the M...
Oral 076
Rotating Shift w...
Oral 077
Insights of Medi...
Oral 078
Ethical Issues i...
Oral 079
Comparative Eval...
Oral 080
Utility of a Mob...
Oral 081
Ethical Issues i...
Oral 082
The Lecture Mast...
Oral 083
To Assess the Ef...
Oral 084
Assess The Effec...
Oral 085
To Assess the Kn...
Oral 086
To Assess the Ef...
Oral 087
To Assess the Ef...
Oral 088
To Assess the Ef...
Oral 089
Assess the Knowl...
Oral 090
To Assess the Ri...
Oral 091
To Assess the Kn...
Oral 092
To Assess the Ef...
Oral 093
A Study to Asses...
Oral 094
A Comparative St...
Oral 095
Effectiveness of...
Oral 096
To Assesss Facto...
Oral 097
A Study to Asses...
Oral 098
A Study to Asses...
Oral 099
Assess the Effec...
Oral 100
The Knowledge an...
Oral 101
Successful Manag...
Oral 102
Awareness and Pr...
Oral 103
Tradition of Ido...
Oral 104
Current Pitfalls...
Oral 105
Concept of Bioet...
Oral 106
SCOPUS Model to ...
Oral 107
Ethics for Pumsa...
Oral 108
Ethical Issues i...
Oral 109
Ethical Issues R...
Oral 110
A Critical Revie...
Oral 111
Need of Ethical ...
Oral 112
The Effect of Ey...
Oral 113
Role of the Nity...
Oral 114
Critical Review ...
Oral 115
Clinical Efficac...
Oral 117
Ethical Importan...
Oral 118
Evaluation of an...
Oral 119
Role of Ayurveda...
Oral 120
Ayurvedic Manage...
Oral 121
Ethical Issues i...
Oral 122
Ethics in Animal...
Oral 123
Perception of Pl...
Oral 124
Designing the Bi...

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