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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2019  |  Volume : 14  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 232-236

Relationship between learning goals set by undergraduate medical students at the commencement and learning outcomes achieved at the end of early clinical phase


1 Department of Physiology, College of Applied Medical Sciences, Imam Abdulrahman Bin Faisal University (Formerly University of Dammam), Al Jubail, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
2 Melaka Manipal Medical College (Affiliated to Manipal Academy of Higher Education, India), Jalan Batu Hampar, Bukit Baru, 75150 Melaka, Malaysia

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Reem Abraham
Professor, Department of Physiology, College of Applied Medical Sciences, Imam Abdulrahman Bin Faisal University (Formerly University of Dammam), Al Jubail
Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/jdmimsu.jdmimsu_21_18

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Background: Medical students entering the clinical term are in a transition phase, wherein the structured classroom environment suddenly changes to one that requires them to face practical as well as emotional challenges. It has been postulated that goal setting would prepare students to face the clinical environment with more readiness than experiencing a “shock of practice.” Aims: This study intended to assess the extent to which undergraduate medical students who experienced the transition phase from preclinical to clinical phase achieved their predetermined learning goals, at the end of clinical phase. Methodology: In the present study, undergraduate medical students (n = 220) at Melaka Manipal Medical College, Manipal Campus, India, on the commencement day of clinical phase, were requested to identify ten learning goals they wished to achieve. At the end of clinical phase, students were again requested to respond to a questionnaire, indicating the extent to which learning goals have culminated as learning outcomes, following which a frequency analysis of the responses was done. Results: Forty learning goals were identified by students, of which thirty learning goals were identified by more than 75% of students, at the commencement of clinical phase. At the end of clinical phase, ten learning goals among these thirty, for example, history taking (89.9%) and communication skills (75.8%), were reported to have achieved as learning outcomes to a great extent by more than 75% of students. Four learning goals, for example, diagnose diseases (42.3%) and manage emergency situations (31.5%), were reported to have achieved as learning outcomes to a great extent by <50% of students. The learning goals identified by students were found to be in line with the course objectives. Conclusions: The present study revealed that students could achieve most of the learning goals identified by them, if not all, which were enlisted in the course objectives, as reported by them.


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