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Year : 2018  |  Volume : 13  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 71-74

Microbiota, biofilm, and chronic rhinosinusitis: A transitory general idea of writings


Faculty of Medicine and Defence Health, Universiti Pertahanan Nasional Malaysia (National Defence University of Malaysia), Kem Perdana Sungai Besi, 57000 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

Correspondence Address:
Prof. Mainul Haque
Faculty of Medicine and Defence Health, Universiti Pertahanan Nasional Malaysia (National Defence University of Malaysia), Kem Perdana Sungai Besi, 57000 Kuala Lumpur
Malaysia
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/jdmimsu.jdmimsu_2_18

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Chronic rhinosinusitis is one of the highly prevalent multifactorial inflammatory disorder of the paranasal sinuses and a public health problem in the developed and developing countries, which reduces the patient's quality of life. The membranes of the nasal and paranasal sinuses' mucosa are the motherland of numerous type of microorganisms such as fungi, bacteria, and viruses causing diseases or not. Furthermore, these complex polymicrobial microbiota families exist in within the nasal and paranasal sinus cavities of both patients without chronic rhinosinusitis and patients with chronic rhinosinusitis; the latter group was observed with minimum diversity when compared with controls. Biofilms are typically defined “as surface-associated microbial communities, surrounded by an extracellular polymeric substance matrix.” Nevertheless, if the microbes get ahead in establishing a biofilm within the human host, the infection frequently becomes fatal and difficult to treat and progresses into a chronic state. Multiple chronic infections such as cystic fibrosis pneumonia, chronic otitis media, chronic rhinosinusitis, and recurrent urinary tract infections, are linked to biofilm formation. S. aureus and P. aeruginosa are major delinquent in the growth of obstinate severe airway disease in chronic rhinosinusitis and cystic fibrosis patients. Moreover, the rapid development of resistant microorganism throughout the planet, jeopardizing the efficacy of antimicrobials, which have once changed medicine and protected millions of lives. Antimicrobial resistance has been currently identified as most dangerous threats to human health.


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